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Full text of "Oakwood Bulletin"

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1982-84 




EIGHTY-SEVENTH AND EIGHTY-EIGHTH YEARS 



HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/oakwoodbulletin198284oakw 



2 



OAKWOOD COLLEGE BULLETIN 




Our Eighty-seventh Year 







^*g0$; 



Oakwood College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, 
handicap, or national origin in the recruitment and employment of faculty 
and the operation of any of its programs and activities as specified by federal 
laws and regulations. The institution reserves the right to revise within a 
school year its policies printed in the catalog so long as such changes are 
publicly announced to the institution's registered population dunng general 
assembly or chapel. 

OAKWOOD COLLEGE 

Huntsville, Alabama 

Printed in U.S.A. 






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1982 





MAY 








JUNE 








JULY 






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M T W T F 


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OCTOBER 








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AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 23 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 



1983 



JANUARY 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

MAY 

S M T W T F S 

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15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 







FEBRUARY 










MARCH 










APRIL 






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8 9 10 

15 16 17 

22 23 24 

JUNE 


4 

11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


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13 

20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 2 3 

8 9 10 

15 16 17 

22 23 24 

29 30 31 

JULY 


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18 
25 


5 
12 
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17 
24 


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11 
18 
25 


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12 13 14 
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26 27 28 

AUGUST 


1 
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15 
22 
29 


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9 

16 

23 

30 


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5 
12 
19 
26 


M 

6 
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1 2 

7 8 9 
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21 22 23 
28 29 30 

OCTOBER 


F 
3 

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17 
24 


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11 

18 

25 


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10 
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M 

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11 
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12 13 14 
19 20 21 
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NOVEMBER 


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30 31 

DECEMBER 


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30 31 



1984 



JANUARY 

S M T W T F S 

3 4 5 6 7 

10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 2-6 27 28 
29 30 31 

MAY 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
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27 28 29 30 31 

SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 

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9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 



FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 

JUNE 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 

OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



MARCH 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 38 29 30 31 

JULY 

5 M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 

NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 



APRIL 

S M T W T F S 

[*"1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

t-8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
*-15 16 17 IjL 19. 20-21* 

-22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
-29 30_^ 

AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 fl3 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 

DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1982-1983 

AUTUMN QUARTER, August 30 - November 24, 1982 
(Instruction 11 Weeks, 1 Day) 

Aug. 17-21 Faculty Colloquium 

Aug. 30 - Sept. 2 Freshmen Orientation and Testing 

Se P l - 2 Registration — Freshmen only 

Sept. 3,5-6 Registration — All Students 

s» Sept. 7 Class Instruction Begins 

Se Pt- 1 Fee for Late Registration 

^J Sept. 17 Last day to enter classes 

Se Pt- 17 Last day for REGISTERED students to ADD a course 

» Se P L 17 Last day for 100% tuition REFUND for dropping ALL 

your courses (See "Refunds" in Bulletin) 

Oct. 13 Mid-Quarter 

° ct - 13 Last day to DROP a course without a grade on perma- 
nent transcript record 

O ct - I 7 *English Proficiency Exam 

0ct - 18_22 Departmental Special Exams for Credit (CLEP, etc.) 

Nov - L12 Pre-registration for Winter Quarter 

Nov. 15-19 Pre-exam Week 

Nov - 18 " 19 Pre-exam STUDY DAYS (Classes at Teachers' Discre- 

J tion) 

Nov. 21-24 Final Exams 

Nov. 30 Final Grades Due 

* Not administered during Spring Quarter. 

WINTER QUARTER, January 2, 1983 - March 16, 1983 
(Instruction 10 Weeks) 

Jan - 2-4 Registration 

J an - ^ Class Instruction Begins 

Jan - 5 Fee for Late Registration 

J an - 14 Last day to enter classes 

Jan - 14 Last day for REGISTERED students to ADD a course 

Jan - 14 Last day for 100% tuition REFUND for dropping ALL 

your courses (See "Refunds" in Bulletin) 

Jan - 17 Martin Luther King's Birthday 

Jan - 30 *English Proficiency Exam 

Feb - 9 Last day to DROP a course without a grade on perma- 
nent transcript record 

Feb. 9 Mid-Quarter 

Feb - 14 ' 18 Departmental Special Exams for Credit (CLEP, etc.) 

Mar - 6 Senior Presentation 

Mar - 7 -H Pre-exam Week 

Mar - l °- U Pre-exam STUDY DAYS (Classes at Teachers' Discre- 
tion) 
Mar - 13-16 Final Exams 

Mar - 18 Final Grades Due 

Mar - 17 -P? Spring Break 



*: XT ^ - ~A 



=r' J .-; , P_ ' . . r\,. 



SPRING QUARTER, March 20 - May 29, 1983 
(Instruction 9 Weeks) 

Mar. 20-22 Registration 

Mar. 23 Class Instruction Begins 

Mar. 23 Fee for Late Registration 

Apr. 1 Last day to enter classes 

A P r - ! Last Day for REGISTERED students to ADD a course 

A P r - 1 Last Day for 100% tuition REFUND for dropping ALL 

your courses (See "Refunds" in Bulletin) 

A P r - ! !" I 5 Departmental Special Exams for Credit (CLEP, etc.) 

A P r - 26 Last Day to DROP a course without a grade on perma- 
nent transcript record 

Apr. 26 Mid-Quarter 

May 18-25 Pre-exam Week 

May 24 ' 25 • Pre-exam STUDY DAYS (Classes at Teachers' Discre- 
tion) 

May 25, 29 Final Exams 

May 30 Final Grades for Seniors Due 

June 3 All Other Grades Due 

June 5 Commencement 

English Proficiency Exam not administered during this quarter 

*SUMMER SESSION, June 13 - July 26, 1983 
(Instruction 6 Weeks) 

June 13 Registration 

June 14 Class Instruction Begins 

June 14 Last day to enter classes 

June 17 Last day for REGISTERED students to ADD a course 

June 24 Last day to DROP a course without a grade on perma- 
nent transcript record 

July 4 Independence Holiday 

July 5 , Mid-Summer Session 

Jul y 25 • • • Pre-exam STUDY DAY (Classes at Teachers' Discre- 
tion) 

July 26-27 Final Exams 

July 27 End of Session 

* Summer school will be conducted only if a sufficient number of students pre-register and pay 
a $50 deposit not later than during the month of January, 1983. 



8 






3 



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: 



1 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1983-1984 

AUTUMN QUARTER, August 29 - November 23, 1983 
(Instruction 11 Weeks, 1 Day) 

Aug. 16-20 Faculty Colloquium 

Aug. 29 - Sept. 1 Freshmen Orientation and Testing 

Sept. 1 Registration — Freshmen only 

Sept. 2, 4-5 Registration — All Students 

Sept. 6 Class Instruction Begins 

Sept. 6 Fee for Late Registration 

Sept. 16 Last day to enter classes 

Sept. 16 Last day for REGISTERED students to ADD a course 

Sept. 16 Last day for 100% tuition REFUND for dropping ALL 

your courses (See "Refunds" in Bulletin) 

Oct. 12 Mid-Quarter 

Oct. 12 Last day to DROP a course without a grade on perma- 
nent transcript record 

Oct. 16 *English Proficiency Exam 

Oct. 17-21 Departmental Special Exams for Credit (CLEP, etc.) 

Oct. 31 - Nov. 11 Pre-registration for Winter Quarter 

Nov. 14-18 Pre-exam Week 

Nov. 17-18 Pre-exam STUDY DAYS (Classes at Teachers' Discre- 
tion) 

Nov. 20-23 Final Exams 

Nov. 29 Final Grades Due 

* Not administered during Spring Quarter. 

WINTER QUARTER, January 2, 1984 - March 14, 1984 
(Instruction 10 Weeks) 

Jan. 2-4 Registration 

Jan. 5 Class Instruction Begins 

Jan. 5 Fee for Late Registration 

Jan. 13 Last day to enter classes 

Jan. 13 Last day for REGISTERED students to ADD a course 

Jan. 13 Last day for 100% tuition REFUND for dropping ALL 

your courses (See ''Refunds" in Bulletin) 

Jan. 16 Martin Luther King's Birthday Observed 

Jan. 29 *English Proficiency Exam 

Feb. 8 Last day to DROP a course without a grade on perma- 
nent transcript record 

Feb. 8 Mid-Quarter 

Feb. 13-17 Departmental Special Exams for Credit (CLEP, etc.) 

Mar. 4 Senior Presentation 

Mar. 5-9 Pre-exam Week 

Mar - 8-9 Pre-exam STUDY DAYS (Classes at Teachers' Discre- 
tion) 

Mar. 11-14 Final Exams 

Mar. 16 Final Grades Due 

Mar. 15-16 Spring Break 

* Not administered during Spring Quarter. 

9 



SPRING QUARTER, March 18 - May 27, 1984 
(Instruction 9 Weeks) 

Mar. 18-20 Registration 

Mar. 21 Class Instruction Begins 

Mar. 21 Fee for Late Registration 

Mar. 30 Last day to enter classes 

Mar. 30 Last Day for REGISTERED students to ADD a course 

Mar. 30 Last Day for 100% tuition REFUND for dropping ALL 

your courses (See "Refunds'' in Bulletin) 

Apr. 9-13 Departmental Special Exams for Credit (CLEP, etc.) 

Apr. 24 Last Day to DROP a course without a grade on perma- 
nent transcript record 

Apr. 24 Mid-Quarter 

May 16-23 Pre-exam Week 

May 22-23 Pre-exam STUDY DAYS (Classes at Teachers' Discre- 
tion) 

May 23-27 Final Exams 

May 28 Final Grades for Seniors Due 

June 1 All Other Grades Due 

June 3 Commencement 

English Proficiency Exam not administered during this quarter 

'SUMMER SESSION, June 11 - July 25, 1984 
(Instruction 6 Weeks) 

June 11 Registration 

June 12 Class Instruction Begins 

June 12 Last day to enter classes 

June 15 Last day for REGISTERED students to ADD a course 

June 22 Last day to DROP a course without a grade on perma- 
nent transcript record 

July 4 Independence Holiday 

July 5 Mid-Summer Session 

July 23 Pre-exam STUDY DAY (Classes at Teachers' Discre- 
tion) 

July 24-25 Final Exams 

July 25 End of Session 

* Summer school will be conducted only if a sufficient number of students pre-register and pay 
a $50 deposit not later than during the month of January, 1984. 



10 



PRESIDENTS OF OAKWOOD COLLEGE 

J. I. Beardsley 1917-1923 

J. A. Tucker 1923-1932 

J. L. Moran 1932-1945 

F. L. Peterson 1945-1954 

G. J. Millet 1954-1963 

A. V. Pinkney 1963-1966 

F. W. Hale, Jr 1966-1971 

C. B. Rock 1971- 

"An institution is the lengthened shadow of a great leader." 

Charles W. Eliot 

HISTORICAL HIGHLIGHTS 

MILEPOSTS IN OAKWOOD'S FORWARD MARCH 

November 16, 1896 Oakwood Industrial School Founded 

1904 Name Changed to Oakwood Manual Training School 

April 9, 1912 Charter Granted to the 

Oakwood Manual Training School 

1917 Oakwood Upgraded to a Junior College 

1932 The ACORN First Published 

May 12, 1938 Charter Amended to Change the 

Name to Oakwood Junior College 

1939 Completion — J. L. Moran Hall 

1943 Oakwood Upgraded to a Senior College 

April 4, 1944 Charter Amended to Change the 

Name to Oakwood College 

1945 Awarding of the First Baccalaureate Degree 

946 Fiftieth Anniversary 

1947 Completion — E. I. Cunningham Hall 

1952 Completion — W. H. Green Hall 

1954 Completion — H. E. Ford Science Hall 

1955 Completion — F. L. Peterson Hall 

Sixtieth Anniversary 



11 



1956 Completion — N. E. Ashby Auditorium 

1957 Completion — Store-Bakery-Post Office Building 

1958 Accreditation by the Southern Association 

of Colleges and Schools 
1959 Completion — College Laundry 

1959 First Honors Convocation 

I960 Completion — Anna Knight Elementary School 

1961 Election to Membership in the 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 

1964 Election to Membership in the 

United Negro College Fund 

1964 Completion — G. E. Peters Hall 

1966 Completion — Bessie Carter Hall 

1968 Completion — W. J. Blake Memorial College Center 

1*969 Completion — O. B. Edwards Hall 

1971 Reaffirmation of Accreditation by the 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 

1973 Completion — Eva B. Dykes Library 

1974 Completion — J. T. Stafford Building 

1974 Completion — Natatorium 

1974 Accreditation of Teacher Education Program by 

State Board of Education and by NASDTEC 

1974 Enrollment Exceeded 1,000 

1975 Awarding of the First Associate Degree in Nursing 

1976 Eightieth Anniversary 

1977 Completion — Oak wood College Church 

1978 Opening of the Print Shop 

1978 Completion and Opening of the Harris Pine Mills 

1978 Opening of the O.C. Radio Station — WOCG 

1979 Completion of Landscaping & Greenhouse Facility 

1980-81 Completion of New Science Complex 

1980-81 Construction of Three Athletic Fields 



12 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

C. E. Bradford, Chairman Washington, D.C. 

R. L. Woodfork, Vice Chairman Washington, D.C. 

C. B. Rock, Secretary Huntsville, Alabama 

E. Amundson South Lancaster, Massachusetts 

J. Bradley New Haven, Connecticut 

L. Butler Washington, D.C. 

E. Canson Westlake Village, California 

R. Carter Berrien Springs, Michigan 

H. Cleveland Columbus, Ohio 

W. O. Coe Takoma Park, Maryland 

S. Cox Kansas City, Missouri 

C. E. Dudley Nashville, Tennessee 

G. Earle Jamaica, New York 

J. Edgecombe Altamonte Springs, Florida 

I. Ford El Cajon, California 

A. Goulbourne Hamilton, Bermuda 

D. K. Griffith Decatur, Georgia 

V. Griffiths Washington, D.C. 

F. W. Hale, Jr Columbus, Ohio 

R. Hairston Atlanta, Georgia 

F. Jones Washington, D.C. 

W. C. Jones Dallas, Texas 

C. Joseph Chicago, Illinois 

F. Knittel Collegedale, Tennessee 

B. E. Leach Burleson, Texas 

A. McClure Decatur, Georgia 

W. Murrain/ Jackson, Mississippi 

W. L. Murrill Washington, D.C. 

L. Paschal Jamaica, New York 

E. Rashford New York, New York 

E. Reile Lincoln, Nebraska 

W. H. Rucker, Jr Nashville, Tennessee 

W. Sumpter Decatur, Georgia 

S. Taylor Washington, D.C. 

M. VanPutten Pine Forge, Pennsylvania 

E. White Portland, Oregon 

M. C. White Westlake Village, California 

J. H. Whitehead Decatur, Georgia 

E. Williamson Bronx, New York 

N. Wilson Washington, D.C. 

T. Wright Indianapolis, Indiana 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

C. E. Bradford, Chairman; R. L. Woodfork, Vice Chairman; C. B. Rock, 
Secretary; C. E. Dudley, J. Edgecombe, D. K. Griffith, R. Hairston, M. 
Murrill, J. H. Whitehead. 13 




BLAKE CENTER 




ADMINISTRATION 
Officers of the College 

Calvin B. Rock, B.A., M.A., LL.D., D.Min. 

President of the College 
*Mervyn A. Warren, B.A., M.A., M.Div., Ph.D., D.Min. 

Vice-President for Academic Affairs 
Isaac R. Palmer, B.S., M.B.A. 

Vice-President for Finance 
Lance Shand, B.A., M.A. 

Vice-President for Student Affairs 
**Rosa Taylor Banks, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D. 

Vice-President for Institutional Advancement and Planning 

Associates and Assistants in Administration 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 

Wintley Phipps, M.Div Assistant to the President 

East Coast Operations 

David Taylor, D.Min Assistant to the President 

West Coast Operations 

Joseph Powell, M.A Chaplain 

Oman A. Bailey, M.A Internal Auditor 

VICE-PRESIDENT OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS OFFICE 

Roy E. Malcolm, Ph.D Acting Vice-President for 

Academic Affairs 

Lovey Ruth Verdun, B.S., B.S Acting Director 

Admissions and Records 

Lillian Green, B.S Senior Program Coordinator 

Pearl Carter Recorder 

Linda Webb, M.S Director, Inner College 

Freshman Studies 

Earl Cleveland, D.D Director of Church Missions 

Faith Watkins Manager of Natatorium 

Library 

Jannith Lewis, Ph.D Library Director 

Alberta Holman, M.S.L.S Reference Librarian 

Ruth M. Swan, M.S. in L.S Media Librarian 

Morris Iheanacho, M.S.L Cataloger 

Clara Rock, B.A Archivist 

* On leave (O.C. History) 
** Also Executive Assistant to the President 

15 



BUSINESS MANAGERS OFFICE 

Benjamin A. Martin, B.B.A Controller 

Patricia Williams, B.S Director, Student Accounting 

Ernest Keller, B.P.S Payroll Accountant 

Hattie Mims, B.A Asst. Student A/C Director 

Minneola Dixon, B.S Coordinator, Student Employment 

Joseph Okike, M.B.A Chief Accountant 

Moges Selassie, M.B.A Purchasing Agent 

Bookstore Manager 
Food Services 

Robert Mines, B.S., R.D Director 

Joseph Dailey, Jr Assistant Director 

Physical Plant 

Roscoe Howard Engineering/Custodial Director 

Harry Dobbins, Jr Motor Pool/Security Director 

Glenn D'Andrade Chief, Security 

Auxiliary Enterprises (Managers) 

Graphic Productions 

Nathan Peters Laundry 

Bakery 

Sandy Robinson, B.A Literature 

Harry Swinton College Market 

Charles Turner Dairy and Farm 



Operation Manager 

Samuel Paschal, B.S Programmer 

Marcia Keller, B.S Personnel Assistant 

* To be supplied 

16 



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I 



INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT PLANNING 

Juliaette Phillips, M.S.W. Director, Public Relations & Publications 

Don McPhaull Manager, WOCG Radio 

Jonathan Roache, MA. Director, Recruitment 

Melvin Davis, .Ph.D Director, Institutional Research 

Rose Yates, Ph.D Director, Federal Relations 1 

Winton Forde, M.S Director, Financial Dev. 

Fred Pullins, M.A Director, Alumni Affairs 

James Massena, B.A., B.S Director, Computer Center 

Onfratinn AAanc*ct(*r "w 



I 



STUDENT AFFAIRS OFFICE 

Leonard Tucker, B.A Dean of Men, Director 

Edwards Hall, Gentlemen Estates 

Gloria Eaton, M.A Dean of Women, Director 

Peterson Hall 

Halsey Banks, B.A Asst. Director 

Gentlemen Estates 

Bruce Wells, B.S Asst. Director 

Edwards Hall, Gentlemen Estates 

Ethel Saunders, M.A Assoc. Director, Peterson Hall 

Theresa Allen, B.A Assoc. Director, Carter Hall 

Ruth Dupre, C.S.W Director, Carter Hall 

Carla Battle Asst. Director, Cunningham Hall 

Dorothy Holloway-Smith Asst. in Student Affairs/ 

Coord. Pre-Alumni 

Deborah Turner, M.A Director of Financial Aid 

Claude Thomas, Jr., M.A Director, Counseling Center 

Jan Ross Coordinator, Career Development, 

Placement 

Health Services 

Marlene McCraw, R.N., B.S Director 

Savonia McClellen, R.N Staff Nurse 

Benjamin Fail, M.D., Family Practice Staff Physician 

Joan Palmer, M.D., Family Practice Staff Physician 

Gussie Hawkins Duncan, M.D Staff Physician 






ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 

C. B. Rock, Chairman; R. Banks, Secretary; A. Blackmon, M. Davis, R. 
Dupre, R. Malcolm, B. Martin, I. Palmer, J. Roache, L. Shand, L. Tucker, 
USM Academic Vice President, USM President, USM Sponsor, L. Webb, 
P. Williams, M. Warren, R. Yates, and all Division Chairpersons. 



17 



DIVISION CHAIRMEN AND 
DEPARTMENT HEADS 

APPLIED SCIENCES AND EDUCATION 

Paul S. Brantley, Ph.D. 

Business Administration *Ronald L. Campbell, M.B.A. 

Business Education and Office Administration . Sandra F. Price, Ed.D. 
Education Paul s Brantley, Ph.D. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Clarence J. Barnes, Ed.S. 

Behavioral Sciences Belvia Matthews, Ph.D. 

History and Political Science Clarence J. Barnes, Ed.S. 

HUMANITIES 

Bernard W. Benn, Ed.D. 

English, Communications, 

Modern Foreign Languages, and Art ... Bernard W. Benn, Ed.D. 

Music Inez L. Booth, M.A. 



I 



RELIGION AND THEOLOGY 
Benjamin F. Reaves, D.Min. 

* Acting Chairperson 

18 



I 



I 



NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 
E. A. Cooper, Ph.D. 

Biology A. F. E. Gibbons, Ph.D. 

Chemistry E A Cooper, Ph.D. 

Home Economics ■. R um Faye Davis, Ph.D. 

Mathematics and Physics John A. Blake, Ed.D. 

Nursin g Alma Foggo York, M.S.N. 



[ 
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PROFESSORS EMERITI 

Carl D. Anderson, Ph.D Professor Emeritus of History 

B.Th., Pacific Union College, 1934; B.A., Pacific Union College, 
1936; M. A. , Andrews University, 1957; Ph.D. , American University, 
1960. (1968-1975) 

John J. Beale, M.A Professor Emeritus of Religion 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1949; M.A., Seventh-day Adventist 
Theological Seminary, 1952. (1949-1975) 

Robert Buyck, Ph.D Professor Emeritus of French 

Baccalaureat es Lettres-philosophie, University of Nancy, France, 
1951; Licence es Lettres, University of Toulouse, 1962; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Colorado, 1971. (1969-1975) 

Eva B. Dykes, Ph.D Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Howard University, 1914; B . S . , Radcliffe College, 1917;M.A., 
Radcliffe College, 1918; Ph.D., Radcliffe College, 1921.(1944-1968, 
1970-1973) 

Murray J. Harvey, Ed.S Professor Emeritus of History 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1936; M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh, 
1955; Ed.S., Ball State University, 1969. (1947-1976) 

Lu L. QuiRANTE, Ed.D Professor Emeritus of Education 

B.S.Ed., Philippine Union College, 1936; M.A., Far Eastern Univer- 
sity, 1947; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1953. (1966-1978) 

Clarence T. Richards, M.A., B.D. . Professor Emeritus of Religion 
B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1940; M.A., Seventh-day Ad- 
ventist Theological Seminary, 1952; B.D., Andrews University, 1962. 
(1947-1978) 

M. Irene Wakeham, Ph.D Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Andrews University, 1934; M.A., University of Southern 
California, 1939; Ph.D., Stanford University, 1965. (1971-1975)) 

FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE 

Ellen J. Anderson, M.S.W Assistant Professor of 

Behavioral Sciences 
B.S., Alabama State University, 1958; M.S.W. , Atlanta University, 
1973. On staff since 1977. 

Cordelia Andrews, M.A.T Instructor in Business Education 

and Office Administration 

B.S., Andrews University, 1975; M.A.T., Andrews University, 1979. 
On staff since 1981. 

19 



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Robert T. Andrews, Ph.D., Ed. D Professor of Education I 

Communications 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1956; M.A., Adventist Theological Semi- 
nary, 1957; Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1969; Ed.D., Andrews 
University, 1977. On staff since 1979. 

Rosa Taylor Banks, Ed.D Associate Professor of 

Business Education 

B.S., Oakwood College, 1967; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh, 1970; 
Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1974. On staff since 1967. 

Nigel Barham, Ph.D., Ed.D Professor of History 

B.D., London University (England), 1964; Diploma in Education, 
Birmingham University (England), 1965; M.A., Andrews University, 
1968; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1976. On staff since 1968. 

Clarence J. Barnes, Ed.S Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1957; M. A., Howard University, 1960; 
Ed.S., Eastern Michigan University, 1968; Doctoral Candidate, 
Wayne State University. On staff since 1975. 

Sylvia J. Barnes, M.Ed Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Howard University, 1961; M.Ed., Wayne State University, 
1967; Doctoral Studies, Peabody Teachers' College. On staff since 
1975. 

Bernard W. Benn, Ed.D Professor of English 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1959; M.A., Seton Hall University, 
1960; Professional Diploma, Teachers' College, Columbia University, 
1963; Ed.D., Teachers' College, Columbia University. On staff since 
1977. 

Ursula T. Benn, M.A Assistant Professor of Spanish 

B.A., Toronto University, 1961; M.A. , Teachers' College, Columbia 
University, 1964. On staff since 1978. 

Alma M. Blackmon, M.A Artist in Residence 

B.S., Miner Teachers College, 1942; M.A., D. C. Teachers College, 
1961; private study under Paul Hume (Catholic University) and Fred- 
erick Wilkerson, Thomas Kerr, and Cecil Cohen (Howard University). 
On staff since 1973. 

John A. Blake, Ed.D Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Howard University, 1963; M.S., Howard University, 1964; 
Ed.S., George Peabody College, 1974; Ed.D., University of Tennes- 
see, Knoxville, 1978. On staff since 1964. 



20 



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Frances H. Bliss, M.S Associate Professor of 

Education and Reading 
B. A., Oakwood College, 1948; M.S., A and T State University, 1974; 
Doctoral Studies, Southern Illinois University. On staff since 1974. 

Inez L. Booth, M.A Associate Professor of Piano and Organ 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1937; M.A., Columbia University, 
1954. On staff since 1939. 

Paul S. Brantley, Ph.D Professor of Education 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1966; M.A., Andrews University, 
1972; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1975. On staff since 1974. 

CAROL A. BROOKS, M.S Instructor in Computer Sciences 

B.S., Oakwood College, 1977; M.S., Alabama A&M University, 
1981. On staff since 1980. 

Ronald Campbell, M.B.A Assistant Professor of 

Business Administration 
B.A., Oakwood College, 1974; M.B.A. , Ohio State University. On 
staff since 1977. 

Luetilla Montgomery-Carter, Ed.S Assistant Professor of 

Physical Education 
B.S., Hampton Institute, 1954; M.S., Alabama A&M University, 
1975; Ed.S., Alabama A&M University, 1979. On staff since 1973. 

Emerson A. Cooper, Ph.D Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1949; M.S. in Chemistry, Polytechnic Insti- 
tute of Brooklyn, 1954; Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1959. On 
staff since 1948. 

♦OLIVER J. Davis, M.A Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1953; B.A., Pacific Union College, 1957; 
M.A., Atlanta University, 1970. On staff since 1979. 

RUTH Faye Davis, Ph.D Professor of Home Economics 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1954; M.A., Michigan State 
University, 1959; Ph.D. , University of North Carolina, 1978. On staff 
since 1964. 

*John T. Dennison, M.A Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., California State University, 1970; M.A., California State Uni- 
versity, 1972; Doctoral Studies, University of Southern California. On 
staff since 1981. 



* On Study Leave. 

21 



Kathleen H. Dobbins, M.S. . . . Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Oakwood College, 1965; M.S., Purdue University, 1967; Doc- 
toral Studies, Peabody Teachers' College. On staff since 1967. 

Aline Dormer, M.S.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.A.S., New York City College, 1972; B.S.N. , University of 
Alabama, 1975; M.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia, 1977. On staff 
since 1975. 

Caryll Dormer, M.S.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

A.S., New York City College, 1969; B.S., Hunter College, 1973; 
M.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia, 1976. On staff since 1973. 

C. Garland Dulan, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Behavioral Sciences 
B.S., Union College, 1967; M.A., University of California at River- 
side, 1974; Ph.D., University of California, 1975. On staff since 1981. 

JEANETTE R. Dulan, M.Ed Assistant Professor in Education 

B.S., Union College, 1966; M.Ed., University of Tennessee, 1979. On 
staff since 1981. 

JAMES E. Dykes, M.Ed Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1946; M.Ed., University of Miami, 1975; 
Doctoral Candidate, University of Miami. On staff since 1971. 

FLORA C. FLOOD, M.S.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia Union College, 1967; M.S.N. , Medical College of 
Georgia, 1977. On staff 1974-1980 and since 1982. 

ASHTON F. E. GIBBONS, Ph.D Professor of Biology 

B. A., Atlantic Union College, 1962; M.A., Boston University, 1967; 
Ph.D., Boston University, 1970. On staff since 1978. 

Esther L. Gill, Ed.D. . . . Associate Professor of Business Education 

Office Admin, and Business Admin. 
B.A., Oakwood College, 1953; M.Ed., Temple University, 1962; 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee, 1981. On staff since 1962. 

Lela M. GOODING, M.A Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1967; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1970; 
Doctoral Studies. On staff since 1972. 

ROSA L. Hadley, Ed.D Professor of Education and Music 

B.S., Fort Valley State, 1951; M.A., Columbia University, 1959; 
Ed.D., Wayne State University, 1972. On staff since 1973. 

JUSTIN C. Hamer, Ph.D Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1949; M.A., Pacific Union College, 
1949; Ph.D., University of New Mexico, 1962. On staff since 1975. 

22 



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Larry Hasse, Ph.D Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Walla Walla College, 1962; M. A., Walla Walla College, 1967; 
Ph.D., Washington State University, 1974. On staff since 1977. 

Alberta Holman, M.S.L.S Assistant Professor (Library) 

B.S., State University of New York, 1969; M.S.L.S., Case Western 
Reserve University, 1970. On staff since 1978. 

MORRIS A. IHEANACHO, M.S.L Assistant Professor (Library) 

B.S., Columbia Union College, 1965; M.S.L. , Western Michigan 
University, 1970. On staff since 1980. 

Constance L. Irving, M.A Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1973; M.A., Ohio State University, 1977. 
On staff since 1981. 

*Lawrence C. Jacobs, Jr., M.B.A Assistant Professor of 

Business Administration 
B.A., Oakwood College, 1958; M.B.A. , Atlanta University, 1969; 
Doctoral Studies, University of Tennessee. On staff since 1971. 

EDWARD O. JONES, Ed.S Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Alabama State University, 1954; M. A., University of Michigan, 
1965; Ed.S., University of Alabama, 1971; Doctoral Studies. On staff 
since 1976. 

*LUCILE Lacy, M.M.Ed Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1968; M.M.Ed., George Peabody College, 
1970; Doctoral Studies, Ohio State University. On staff since 1971. 

LAI Hing, KENNETH, M.S Instructor in Chemistry 

A.S., New York City Community College, 1970; B.S., Richmond 
College, 1972; M.S., Long Island University, 1981. On staff since 
1982. 

ELFRED LEE, B. A Instructor in Art 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1965. On staff since 1981. 

JANNITH L. Lewis, Ph.D. in L.S Professor (Library) 

B.S., University of Kansas, 1953; M.A. in L.S., Indiana University, 
1955; Ph.D., Indiana University, 1981. On staff since 1953. 

Lily Wilson-Lindsay, M.S Assistant Professor of 

Home Economics 
B.S., Oakwood College, 1974; M.S., Loma Linda University, 1976. 
On staff since 1977. 

SETH G. Lubega, Ph.D Professor of Biology 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1967; M.S., Howard University, 1969; 
Ph.D., Howard University, 1975. On staff 1971-72 and since 1976. 

* On Study Leave 

23 



Roy E. Malcolm, Ph.D Associate Professor of 

Behavioral Sciences 

B.Th., Canadian Union College, 1962; M.A., Andrews University, 
1963; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1974. On staff since 1968. 

Bel via Matthews, Ph.D Associate Professor of 

Behavioral Sciences 

B.S., Columbia Union College, 1966; M.A., Alabama A&M Univer- 
sity, 1970; Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1977. On staff since 
1977. 

Artie Melancon, Ed.D Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1951; M.Ed., University of Nebraska, 
1972; Ed.D., University of Nebraska, 1982. On staff since 1976. 

James H. Melancon, M.A Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1953; M.A., Andrews University, 1955; 
Doctoral Studies, University of Iowa. On staff since 1976. 

ANNE Meyer, M.S.N Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia Union College, 1957; M.S.N. , University of Ala- 
bama, 1957. On staff since 1976. 

Gregory S. Mims, M.S.W Assistant Professor of 

Behavioral Sciences 

B.S., Oakwood College, 1962; M.S.W. , Wayne State University, 
1971. On staff since 1977. 

FRANCES L. Davis-Mouzon, Ed.S. . . . Associate Professor of English 
B . S . , Savannah State College , 1 95 1 ; M . Ed . , Florida A&M University , 
1962; Ed.S., University of Florida, 1974. On staff since 1973. 

Richard S. Norman, M.B.A Assistant Professor of 

Business Administration 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1949; M.B. A., A&M University, 1974. On 
staff since 1962. 

EURYDICE OSTERMAN, M.M Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., Andrews University, 1972; M.M., Andrews University, 1975. 
On staff since 1975. 

Anthony Paul, M.S Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., A&M University, 1976; M.S., A&M University, 1981. On staff 
since 1979. 

Juliaette W. Phillips, M.S.W Assistant Professor of 

Behavioral Sciences 

B.S., Alabama State College, 1952; M.S.W., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1971. On staff since 1974. 

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CLIFFORD PITT, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Newbold College, 1971; M.A., Andrews University, 1972; 
Ph.D., University of London, 1976. On staff since 1977. 

Sandra F. Price, Ed.D Associate Professor of 

Business Education and Office Administration 

B.S., Athens College, 1969; M.S./Bus. Ed., Alabama A&M Univer- 
sity, 1973; Ed.D., University of Tennessee, 1982. On staff since 1967. 

Benjamin F. Reaves, D.Min Professor of Religion 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1955; M.A., Andrews University, 1966; 
M.Div., Andrews University, 1972; D.Min., Chicago Theological 
Seminary, 1974. On staff since 1977. 

Jean Reaves, M.S Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Andrews University, 1976; M.S., Alabama A&M University, 
1980. On staff since 1977. 

JAMES A. RODDY, M.Ed. . . Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
B.A., University of Southern Mississippi, 1965; M.Ed., University of 
Southern Mississippi, 1970. On staff since 1965. 

Emmanuel Saunders, Ph.D Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Howard University, 1966; M.A., Howard University, 1969; 
Ph.D., Howard University, 1976. On staff since 1977. 

Ruth M. Swan, M.S.L.S Instructor (Library) 

B.S., Columbia Union College, 1969; M.S.L.S., Drexel University, 
1975. On staff since 1979. 

Claude Thomas, Jr., M.A Assistant Professor of 

Behavioral Sciences 
B.S., City College, N.Y., 1958; M.A., Andrews University, 1970; 
Doctoral Studies. On staff since 1967. 

Lewis Thompson, Ph.D Professor of Physics 

B.A., Rice University, 1950; M.A., Rice University, 1952; Ph.D., 
Rice University, 1954. On staff since 1977. 

Mary Elise TOOMBS, Ed.D Assistant Professor of 

Business Education 
B.S., Oakwood College, 1955; M.Ed., Memphis State University, 
1978; Ed.D., University of Northern Colorado, 1981. On staff since 
1982. 

Evelyn Tucker, M.S Assistant Professor of 

Business Education 

A.S., West Indies College, 1968; B.S., Oakwood College, 1975; 
M.S., A&M University, 1977. On staff since 1977. 

25 



Donald L. Vanterpool, M. A Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., C.W. Post College, 1967; M.A., Andrews University, 1976; 
Doctoral Candidate, Andrews University. On staff since 1982. 

*STANLEY A. Ware, M.M Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., Oakwood College, 1970; M.M., George Peabody College, 
1975. On staff since 1971. 

Barbara Jean Warren, M.Ed Assistant Professor of 

Home Economics 
B.S. , Columbia Union College, 1959; M.Ed. , Alabama A&M Univer- 
sity, 1981. On staff since 1977. 

Mervyn A. Warren, Ph.D., D.Min Professor of Religion 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1957; M.A., Seventh-day Adventist 
Theological Seminary, 1959; B.D., Andrews University, 1961; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University, 1966; D.Min., Vanderbilt Divinity School, 
1975. On staff since 1961. 

Linda L. Webb, M.S Assistant Professor of Behavioral Sciences 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1969; M.S., Alabama A&M, 1973. On staff 
since 1973; 1976. 

Gwendolyn White, B.S.N Instructor in Nursing 

B. S., University of Alabama in Hunts ville, 1977. On staff since 1977. 

Henry M. Wright, M.Div Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1964; M.A., Andrews University, 1965; 
M.Div., Methodist Theological Seminary in Ohio, 1978; Doctoral 
Studies, Vanderbilt Divinity School. On staff since 1978. 

ALMA C. FOGGO York, M.P.H Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S.N. , Columbia Union College, 1965; M. P. H., Harvard University 
School of Public Health, 1976. On staff since 1982. 



On Study Leave 



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PART-TIME FACULTY 

(1981-1982) 



MlCHELE Ammons, M.M Lecturer in Music 

Danny Blanch ard, Ph.D Lecturer in Behavioral Sciences 

Lenore Brantley, M.A Lecturer in English 

KlCHOON CHANG, Ph.D Lecturer in Chemistry 

E. E. Cleveland, D.Div Lecturer in Religion 

Gene Crawford, M.D Lecturer in Biology 

LuciNDA Crayton, M.A Lecturer in Mathematics 

CAROLYN DOSS, Ph.D Lecturer in Education 

Victor Duncan, M.D Lecturer in Biology 

Leila Falt, M.A Lecturer in French 

GETACHEW Gabre, M.Sc Lecturer in Engineering 

Hayward Handy, Ph.D Lecturer in English (Communications) 

T. M. KELLY, B.A Lecturer in Religion 

JORGE E. KUZMICIC, Ed.D Lecturer in Psychology 

Calvin O. Matthews, Ph.D Lecturer in Psychology 

Calvin E. Moseley, M.A Lecturer in Religion 

JOSEPH OKIKE, M.B.A Lecturer in Business Administration 

Dorothy Patterson, M.S Lecturer in English 

WlLMA PORTER, M.Ed Lecturer in English 

ALLEN Reid, M.A Lecturer in Music 

Clarence T. Richards, M.A Lecturer in Religion 

Jonathan Roache, M.A Lecturer in Education 

Sandy Robinson, B.A Lecturer in Religion 

William Robinson, M.M.Ed Lecturer in Music 

Calvin B. Rock, D.Min Lecturer in Behavioral Sciences 

Lance Shand, M.A Lecturer in Religion 

Martin Van Sherrill, M.D Lecturer in Biology 

Abigail Shiver, Ed.D Lecturer in Education 

Cleveland B. Tivy, M.A.T Lecturer in Religion 

George Wendell Tollerton, M.A.T Lecturer in Mathematics 

Karen Tucker, M.Ed Lecturer in English 

Ruth Warren, M.S Lecturer in Physical Education 

ViNETTA WESLEY, M.A Lecturer in Sociology 

Florence M. Winslow, M.A Lecturer in Art and English 



27 



ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEES 

(The President is an ex officio member of all committees.) 

Administrative Council 

Admissions 

Safety and Fire Prevention 

Traffic 

Health and Sanitation 

Institutional Research 

Residence Directors' Council 

Staff Services 

Loans and Scholarships 

Appeals 

Student Life 

College Judiciary- 



Financial Aid 

Institutional Policies 

Industry 



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COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

(The President is an ex officio member of all committees.) 

Academic Policies 

Arts and Lectures 

Citation and Recognition 

College Days 

Counseling and Testing 

Honors 

Hospitality 

Library Services 

Religious Emphasis 

Faculty Research 

Teacher Education Council 

Faculty Involvement 



29 






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Welcome to Oakwood 

Here is a place "where loveliness keeps house," 

.... where "true education" means more than the pursual of a 
certain course of study, 

.... where the Oakwood program of Christian education is 
focused both on Christian growth and academic excel- 
lence, 

.... where students from scores of states and foreign lands 
"enter to learn and depart to serve," and 

.... where both teacher and student find a common bond of 
unity as "companions in learning and searching for 
truth." 

Look through these pages and get a view of Oakwood College. 
Behold its emphasis on the spiritual, its viable academic pro- 
gram, its student-centered activities, its beautiful campus, its 
modern physical plant, and all that go together to make Oakwood 
a place "where loveliness keeps house." 

CALVIN B. ROCK, President 

LOCATION 

Oakwood College is located five miles northwest of the heart of the city 
of Huntsville. Huntsville is a cosmopolitan city located in the north central 
portion of the state of Alabama and nestled in the beautiful Tennessee Valley 
at the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. It has a population of 
160,000. F F 

The College property consists of 1,185 acres at an elevation of 1,100 
feet above sea level. The grounds of the campus are appropriately land- 
scaped and afford a delightful setting for the College. 

Huntsville is served by the Continental Trailways and connection with 
other bus lines can be made in practically all nearby cities. Huntsville is also 
served by Southern, Eastern, and United Airlines. 

Upon arrival at times other than the opening dates published in this 
Bulletin, students will find taxi service available. It is expected that all 
students will make full arrangements with the College before their arrival. 

ACCREDITATION 

Oakwood is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools and the Seventh-day Adventist Board of Regents. Its programs are 
accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Educa- 
tion, and the Alabama State Board of Education. 

31 



32 Oakwood College 



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INSTITUTIONAL MISSION 

Oakwood College, a four-year undergraduate, church-related, liberal 
arts institution founded in 1896 in the city of Huntsville, Alabama, is 
historically committed to providing a unique and challenging educational 
opportunity for students who exhibit academic potential but whose needs for 
training stem from educational and socio-economic deprivation. The Col- 
lege has historically demonstrated its philosophy that meaningful education 
is more than the pursual of a certain course of study. It, therefore, endeavors 
to foster the holistic view of educating the whole being through the harmoni- 
ous development of the physical, cultural, intellectual, mental, and spiritual 
faculties. 

The mission of the College inheres in the provision of a liberal, yet 
functional curriculum program in arts and sciences, and in professional 
preparation in education and business. Such liberal, professional, and pre- f" 

professional programs are further complemented by experiential and occu- 
pational learning in selected fields and vocations. 

Finding in the Christian faith the true basis for understanding all human 
experiences, Oakwood accepts the responsibility of achieving in each stu- P" 

dent academic excellence but acknowledges the further obligation to main- 
tain and exemplify Christian commitment in scholarships and in all institu- 
tional endeavors. Throughout its programs of instruction, research, and 
public service, the College seeks to enlighten the mind, to enhance the 
quality of personality, to enable each individual, out of Christian love and L 

concern, to serve mankind creatively, responsibly, and humanely, and to 
enkindle a never-ending search for knowledge and truth. 

Because of its historic commitment to serve those who exhibit high 
academic potential but are deprived of educational enrichment, the College 
provides a strong basic educational and support program through academic 
advising and counseling. To meet the needs of its gifted and average — 

students, Oakwood College further shares with other institutions the univer- 
sal concerns of higher education: a teaching function designed to develop L 
highly skilled individuals dedicated to the improvement of life in American 
society through service to the community. Toward this end, the College f- 
seeks to attract qualified and dedicated faculty and encourages through them 
experimentation with traditional and nontraditional educational methods and L- 
instructional strategies to increase the quality and productivity of its educa- 
tional services. » 

Oakwood College is also committed to serving the needs of the under- 
prepared student by ( 1) providing a program for the elimination of deficits in ■*- 
basic skills essential for a college education, (2) providing guidance and 
counseling for that group of students which focus upon those dimensions I"" 
which might be and often are inhibitive of success; and (3) using varied 
instructional approaches. It is the Institution's design that through these 
techniques the underprepared student will acquire the necessary self- 
confidence and tools to successfully complete programs focused on tradi- 



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General Information 33 

tional as well as nontraditional career pursuits or programs leading to 
graduate or professional education. 

Recognizing the influence of a suitable environment upon learning and 
the assurance of achieving the mission described above, the College seeks to 
provide a physical environment and appropriate academic and student sup- 
port systems to facilitate the variety of human interaction and relationships 
essential for learning, and to provide programs and facilities which allow for 
continuous evaluation, growth, and expansion of the Institution. 

GOALS 

The mission of Oakwood College can be expressed in six general goals: 
spiritual, intellectual, cultural, personal adjustment, vocational, andphysi- 
cal. 

1 . Spiritual: To provide a spiritual environment and religious instruc- 
tion that will enable the student to reflect fully the image of Jesus 
Christ through emphasis on the development of character and talent, 
the nobililty of ambition, the keenness of perception with sound 
judgment, so that the student is prepared to render unselfish service 
to God and man. 

2. Intellectual: To provide academic programs and comprehensive 
curricula made up of a broad range of degree programs which will 
allow each student to acquire knowledge and skills to grow person- 
ally, socially, academically, and professionally, and to meet their 
needs and societal demands. 

3. Cultural: Enrich the lives of community residents and students by 
serving as a cultural and educational center, offering cultural and 
recreational programs of interest and value. 

4. Personal Adjustment: To provide opportunities which will help 
students identify, clarify, and develop their aesthetic, moral, and 
spiritual values and philosophy, through supportive student services 
programs which facilitate growth and success in the academic, 
social, economic, and spiritual community. 

5. Vocational: To provide for the students courses which will impart 
skills and knowledge in certain vocations best suited to the students' 
interests and aptitudes, while teaching them the dignity of labor 
through provisions of on-campus work opportunities and courses 
which provide field experiences which aid in their choice of a 
vocation. 

6. Physical: To provide a health and physical education program along 
with recreational activities that will give an understanding of and 
encourage proper care of the body. Consistency in the teaching of 
good health habits is carried throughout the College's food and 
recreational program. 



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34 Oakwood College 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The College property consists of 1,185 acres, of which 500 are under 
cultivation. One hundred and five acres comprise the main campus. 

The J. L. Moran Hall houses teachers' offices, classrooms, and the 
College Auditorium with a seating capacity of 500. The original structure 
was built in 1939, extensions were added to the east and west sections in 
1943 and 1944, respectively. 

The E. I. Cunningham Hall, constructed in 1947, is the residence hall 
for freshman college women. It contains rooms for 136 students. Each room 
is supplied with hot and cold running water. A parlor, worship room, utility 
rooms, and the dean's apartment are on the second floor. The art classroom 
is located in the east wing of the first floor. 

The Teachers' Cottages, constructed in 1947, afford some twenty-two 
homes for the use of faculty members , several of these being used as annexes 
to residence halls for seniors and mature students. Still others are being 
converted to serve as administrative offices. 

The W. H. Green Hall, erected in 1952, houses teachers' offices and r— 

classrooms for the following departments: Behavioral Sciences and History. 

The H. E. Ford Science Hall, completed and dedicated in 1954, 
provided classrooms and laboratories for the Division of Natural Sciences 
and Mathematics until 1981. (Now Student Center). 

The F. L. Peterson Hall, completed in 1955, is the residence hall for 
freshman college women. It contains a worship room, recreation hall, two 
lounges, guest rooms, the dean's apartment, and infirmary, and has a 
capacity of 172 persons. 

The N. E. Ashby Auditorium, constructed in 1956, houses the Physical 
Education Department. 

The Store-Bakery-Post Office Building, constructed in 1957, provides 
community center services. 

The College Laundry, constructed in 1959, is provided with modern 
equipment necessary for the needs of the College. Some commercial work is 
done for Redstone Arsenal and the citizens of Huntsville. 

The Anna Knight Elementary School, completed in 1960, is located 
west of the College campus, and serves as a laboratory school for the 
Elementary Education Department. 

The Dairy Barn, constructed in 1960, contains a modern, well- 
equipped milking parlor. 

The G. E. Peters Hall, constructed in 1964, houses the Art and Music 
Departments. 

The Bessie Carter Hall, constructed in 1966, houses 275 college 
women above the freshman rank. 

The W. J. Blake Memorial Center, completed in 1968, contains the 
administrative offices of the College, the Cafeteria, and other amenities. 



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General Information 35 

The O.B. Edwards Hall, completed in 1969, houses 240 college men 
above the freshman rank. 

The Eva B. Dykes Library, completed in 1973, is a modern learning 
resource center. Housed in its very elegant facilities are all of the standard 
library services needed to support a strong academic program. This building 
also houses the Arabella Symington Memorial Laboratory for the Com- 
munication Skills and Teacher Education Center located on the lower level 
of the building. 

The J. T. Stafford Building, completed in 1974, is a modern educational 
center consisting of classrooms, laboratories, and offices. 

The Natatorium, completed in 1974, houses a 120 x 45 Olympic 
swimming pool. 

The Oakwood College Church, completed in 1977, is a beautiful 
sanctuary with a seating capacity of 2,700. 

The Moseley Complex, completed in 1977, houses teachers' offices and 
classrooms for the Religion Department and the Religion Chapel. 

Gentlemen Estates, constructed in 1977, consists of 24 modern trailers 
to house college freshmen. 

The College Press, reestablished in 1978, is located on Oakwood Road 
less than one mile west of the central campus. 

WOCG, the Oakwood College radio station, is located on Oakwood 
Road less than one mile west of the central campus. 

The Science Complex, completed in 1981, houses the departments of 
biology, chemistry, home economics, mathematics-physics and nursing. It 
provides over 85,000 square feet of laboratory, classroom, office and 
storage space. 

The Natelka E. Burr ell Education Building, renovated in 1982, houses 
the Department of Education. 

THE EVA B. DYKES LIBRARY 

The Eva B. Dykes Library is a vital part of the academic program at 
Oakwood College. Designed to provide space for more than 200,000 vol- 
umes, it now contains over 82,000 volumes. New books are being acquired 
at the rate of approximately 3,000 a year. The library serves as a learning 
resources center, and a reading, study, and materials center to support the 
educational objectives of the institution for faculty and students. In addition 
to the general book collection, there are special collections of black studies 
materials, archival materials, multimedia materials, children's books and 
paperbacks. 

Also, there is a special museum-exhibit room housed in the building 
which contains display materials related to Seventh- day Adventist Black 
history. Oakwood College history, and artifacts donated by Mr. P. W. 
Ridge way from his many travels around the world. 




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Student Life 37 

STUDENT LIFE 

Religious Life: At Oakwood, religion is the natural thing. The College 
Church, the Sabbath School, the A.Y.S. (Adventist Youth) Society, the 
Ministerial Forum, the student literature evangelism program, the residence 
hall worship hours , and the many prayer bands afford the students excellent 
opportunities for the development of character, self-expression, leadership, 
and initiative. 

Convocations, the Lyceum Course: During the school year distin- 
guished guest speakers address the student body at the chapel hour as well as 
conduct Religious Emphasis weeks. The College Lyceum series bring to the 
campus each year several outstanding lecturers and artists. In addition to 
this, many other programs of equal eminence are sponsored by the College. 

Social Activities: A wholesome program of social activities is planned 
by the Director of Student Activities in consultation with the Coordinating 
Council of Campus Organizations composed of faculty and students. Social 
programs are sponsored during the year by clubs, classes, and organizations. 
The students also enjoy the social and cultural life of the faculty members' 
homes . 

Extracurricular Activities Participation: In order to ensure satisfactory 
scholarship, the extent to which students may participate in extracurricular 
activities is subject to regulation. 

The recreational activities of the College are designed to serve the wide 
variety of leisure-time interests of the students. The College does not engage 
in off-campus or intercollegiate athletics. 

Intramural Sports: The College sponsors a program of intramural 
sports in connection with the physical education activities. 

Health Service: The College Health Service is designed to meet the 
medical needs of students. Nurses are on active duty during the day and 
evening and on call for emergencies at night. The College Physician holds 
regular clinic hours in the Health Office four days a week and is available on 
call. In case of serious illness or accident, excellent complete hospital care is 
readily available. 

Parents or guardians of students who are seriously ill will be notified 
immediately. 

Student Organizations: Membership in the departmental clubs is based 
on academic attainment in regular college work and is considered a distinct 
honor. The list of student organizations follows: 

United Student Movement: The United Student Movement of Oakwood 
College is the major student organization of the College. This organization 
seeks to promote a more perfect relationship among all sectors of the College 
community; to enhance the religious, academic, cultural, and social pro- 
grams of the College; and to emphatically support the aims and objectives of 
Oakwood College. 

Each matriculated, regular student of Oakwood College is a member of 



38 Oakwood College 

the United Student Movement. The United Student Movement finances its 
own program through the payment of individual membership dues. With the 
help and approval of faculty sponsors, the United Student Movement carries 
out such programs and student activities. 
Class Organizations 

Freshman Class Junior Class 

Sophomore Class Senior Class 

Residence Clubs 

Carter Hall Residence Hall Club (Delta Sigma Phi) 

Cunningham Hall Residence Hall Club 

Edwards Hall Residence Hall Club 

Peterson Hall Residence Hall Club 

Gentlemen's Estate Residence Hall Club (Beta Alpha Mu) 

Married Students' Club 

Departmental Clubs 

Behavioral Science Club (Omega Sigma Psi) 

Business and Secretarial Club (Phi Beta Lambda) 

English Club 

Home Economics Club (Omicron Nu Kappa) 

International Students Organization 

Music Club (Mu Alpha Gamma) 

Nursing Club (WO-HE-LO — Work, Health. Love) 

Oakwood Scientific Society 

Pre-Law Club 

Religion and Theology Club (Ministerial Forum) 

Education Student Club 



: 



GOVERNING STANDARDS 

It is the purpose of the College to develop strong men and women with 
high standards of scholarship and the self-discipline necessary for Christian P 

leadership. 

The campus government and discipline, therefore, are founded upon 
the principle that character building is the highest object of education and 
that a good name, standing for integrity, honor, and godliness, is the P 

objective alike of the student for himself and of the College for him. I 

Oakwood College is a Seventh-day Adventist college established to 
provide a Christian environment in which students may prepare themselves 
for service at home and in other lands. In order to maintain this environment 
certain general rules of conduct apply. 

Student Handbook: In every community there are laws . It is the respon- 
sibility- of every- student to secure from the Office of Student Affairs and to 
read the rules and regulations governing student life at Oakwood College, 
preferably before registration. Familiarity with and acceptance of the re- 
quirements set forth in this book will make life at Oakwood College more 
interesting and certainly more enjoyable. 



: 



Student Life 39 

A student's standing in a Christian school is based not alone on his 
scholarship attainment but also upon his general conduct and his attitude 
toward the community in which he lives. As a citizen of the college 
community the student must realize that he has been admitted to a privileged 
group and thata he has no right to work against that group. Any student who 
violates the rules of the College or whose conduct evidences lack of respect 
for the standards maintained by the College may be asked to withdraw. 

STUDENT CITIZENSHIP 

Each individual coming to Oakwood College for the purpose of enter- 
ing any department of the College is subject to its supervision and jurisdic- 
tion from the time of arrival in Huntsville until his connection is terminated 
by graduation or by any officially approved withdrawal. 

The record of each student is reviewed periodically, and his continua- 
tion in college is based upon his attitudes and general conduct, as well as his 
scholastic attainments. 

Listed among the government policies of the College are infractions 
which are considered suspendable and may be cause for dismissal or serious 
disciplinary action of the first offense. 

Since no student who makes a habit of indulging in any of these 
practices would knowingly be accepted at Oakwood College, the first 
infraction may result in dismissal from school. 

A student whose progress or conduct is unsatisfactory or whose influ- 
ence is detrimental may be asked to withdraw at any time. 

Any student dismissed from school withdraws immediately from the 
campus and may be subjected to charges of trespassing should he return 
without permission from the Administration. 

Leave of Absence: Permission for an ordinary leave of absence from the 
campus may be obtained from the appropriate Residence Dean. Approval 
must also be obtained from the work superintendent. When a leave of 
absence involves absence from a class, permission must be obtained from 
the Dean of the College . When the leave of absence takes a student farther 
than the city of Huntsville, it must be approved by the Office of Student 
Affairs. Written permission from the parent or guardian for travelling must 
be on file for every student requesting a leave of absence. Exceptions to this 
rule are granted only to students who are both of legal age and self- 
supporting. In every case, working students must secure the approval of their 
work superintendent before presenting their requests to their respective 
deans. 

Attendance at Religious Services: Oakwood College is emphatically a 
Christian college. Attendance at evening worships, chapel, Friday evening 
vespers, Sabbath School, and Sabbath morning church service is a basic 
requirement. 

Use of Vehicles: Since the ownership and the use of an automobile 
frequently militate against success in college, students are not encouraged to 



^° ^^ Oakwood College 

bring automobiles with them to the College unless absolutely necessary. 
Freshmen are not permitted to bring automobiles to the College, or to the 
vicinity, or to operate automobiles owned by other individuals. 

All students, whether living in residence halls or in the community, 
who own or operate any type of motor vehicle (car, motorcycle, scooter,' 
etc .) must register it with the Office of Security at the time of registration for 
the fall quarter, or within 24 hours of his arrival should he" arrive after 
registration has been concluded or within 24 hours of its procurement within 
any quarter of the school year. Owners must have a valid operator's license 
and must show proof of liability insurance (including medical coverage) at 
the time of registration and whenever requested by traffic enforcement i — 

personnel. 

— 
RESIDENCE HALLS 

All unmarried students are required to live in one of the College 
residence halls and to board in the College Cafeteria unless they live with 
parents or with other close relatives in the City of Hunts ville. When campus T ~ 

housing is overcrowded, students age 23 and over may apply to the Housing 
Committee for permission to live in the community. Under special cir- 
cumstances, students under age 23 also may apply to the Housing Commit- 
tee for permission to live off-campus in an officially approved "home. *" 

Such applications will be acted on only at the beginning of a quarter. 
Failure to secure official approval to reside in the community or to withdraw 
from a college residence hall when directed to do so will invalidate the 
registration of a student. Students who have received approval for off *~ 

campus living may be called into the College residence halls at any time the 
administration deems necessary for reasons of discipline or under-utilization f~ 

of available space in the residence halls. 

Residence Supervision: Each residence hall is under the direction of a 
Residence Dean. The Residence Deans have general supervision of the 
well-being of the students under their charge. 

APARTMENTS ^ 

The College owns thirty units of one- and two-bedroom apartments 
which are available for married students. These apartments rent for reasona- 
ble amounts. There are also approved apartments in the community, fur- 
nished and unfurnished, in which married students may live. For informa- 
tion write the Business Manager. 

THE COUNSELING CENTER 

A comprehensive program of guidance and counseling services is made 
available to students. 

SERVICES 

Services include TESTING (diagnostic assessment, national placement 
examinations, CLEP), COUNSELING (personal, career, pre-marital, mar- 






Counseling 41 

riage and family), PLACEMENT (post-baccalaureate recruitment for pro- 
spective graduates, full- and part-time jobs within the metropolitan area of 
Huntsville), and DEVELOPMENTAL GUIDANCE (career development, 
human relations, leadership training, and family life education). 

GOALS AND PHILOSOPHY 

The Center's emphasis is on personal development. Its primary goal is 
to help students become more effective in handling and resolving problem 
situations before they become critical by teaching them what to expect and 
how to behave adaptively under most circumstances. It is a preventive 
philosophy which is believed to be most suitable to the needs, beliefs, and 
practices of Seventh-day Adventists and other fundamentally conservative 
Christians. 

The goal for its consulting activities is to facilitate the continuing 
development and maintenance of an optimal collegiate environment for 
learning and individual growth. 

CONFIDENTIALITY 

Personal information regarding specific individuals is held in strictest 
confidence and may not be released without the written consent of the 
persons involved. 

COST 

Professional services to students are given without charge. There are, 
however, charges associated with the computer scoring and analysis of 
diagnostic tests and the administration of the national placement examina- 
tions and CLEP. 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

Two special programs are administered through the Counseling Center. 
They are, 1) Cooperative Education, and 2) Freshman Studies. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

The Cooperative Education Program (CEP) combines classroom learn- 
ing with actual work experience in community businesses and corporations. 
This is done on an alternating basis in a work setting that closely relates to a 
student's major field of study and his/her career aspiration. 

Benefits. Academic credits are earned in the classroom and on the job. 
In addition, a number of other student needs are met. They are, 1) money to 
pay educational costs and provide for personal necessities; 2) opportunity to 
test the propriety of educational and career goals; 3) opportunity to enrich the 
learning process by applying theoretical concepts to the practical, concrete 
demands of real work situations and their attendant problems; and 4) upon 
graduation, increased employability because, of the distinct advantage of 
having a college degree and bona fide work experience in the career of one's 
choice. 



42 Oakwood College 

Eligibility. To qualify for the program, students must have completed 
their freshman year and have and maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 
2.50. Transfer students may apply after completing twelve (12) hours in 
residence at Oakwood College. 

Rate of Pay. Once hired, students are paid by the employing organiza- 
tions at the standard rate for entry level workers or in accordance with their 
individual experience and skills. Under no circumstances should they earn f" 

less than minimum wage. 

Academic Credit. Up to twelve (12) hours of academic credit may be 
earned for each quarter that you participate in the program. For written 
details on how to qualify for these hours, contact the Counseling-Placement 
Office or the Office of Academic Affairs. L 

The credits earned through participation in CEP are elective credits and 
may be included in the total required for graduation. However, they will _ 

NOT be deducted from the minimum hours required for the major and/or 
minor. It must be understood that, in most cases, participation in the L 

program will entail more than four years of study to complete the require- 
ments for the baccalaureate degree. — 

Cooperative Education courses may be identified by the prefix CE. The 
last digit of the number refers to the work period for that year. For example: L»- 

CE 301 - CE 306: First Work Period through Sixth Work Period. 

Where to Apply. Students wishing to apply for CEP should first, 1) f 

consult with the Coordinator of Cooperative Education at the Counseling 
Center, and 2) submit a formal request to the Academic Policies Committee. 

FRESHMAN STUDIES 

The Freshman Studies Program is a composite of diagnostic, instruc- 
tional, and supportive services to first- year students. Its purpose is to w 
increase their potential for academic success and personal adjustment to the 
demands of college life. Components of the program include: — 
Orientation. 

The week preceding registration for the Fall Quarter of each year is 
known as Freshman Orientation Week. New students admitted to freshman 
status are expected to report as notified and, upon arrival, to participate in 
all of the scheduled activities of the week. These include (a) orientation to the 
academic and residential requirements of the College and the resources that 
are available to assist all students in meeting them successfully; (b) de- 
velopmental guidance and instruction regarding tasks, skills, and attitudes 
that are essential for academic and personal success. 
Diagnostic Assessment. 

During Freshman Orientation Week and at the beginning of every r 

quarter thereafter, special tests are administered which are required of all 
new freshmen. They are the American College Test (ACT), the Stanford Ik 

Diagnostic Reading Test (SDRT), the California Personality Inventory 
(CPI), and the Mooney Problem Checklist (MPC). 



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Cooperative Programs 43 

Results from these tests are used for ( 1) placing students in appropriate 
courses of study; (2) facilitating the development and/or provision of pre- 
scriptive teaching materials and strategies; (3) fulfilling Alabama state 
requirements for entrance into special programs; and (4) assisting advisors 
and counselors in their work of helping students to plan their academic 
programs, evaluate their academic progress, and set realistic personal and 
career goals. Accumulated data will help the College to determine what 
areas of its programs and services needs strengthening and/or modification 
in order to effectively fulfill its commitment to the success of its students. 
Academic Advisement and Program Planning. 

Although their declared interests in specific disciplines will be ac- 
knowledged, first-year students will be encouraged to concentrate on gen- 
eral education requirements for the purpose of academic exploration and 
continuing self-discovery. Freshman advisors, by means of extended inter- 
views and performance reviews throughout the year, will assist in the 
process of confirming or modifying the personal interests and aspirations of 
each student. 

Special Services. 

Students with special academic and developmental needs will receive 
appropriate assistance from Inner College, the school's learning resource 
center. Assistance will be in the form of individualized course loads, 
specialized instruction, tutoring, and counseling performed by a dedicated 
staff of professional counselors and selected honor students. Referrals for 
more specialized services will be made as warranted. 

COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS 

The following types of coop programs are made available at Oakwood 
College: 1) Visiting Students, 2) Architect, Engineering, and Veterinary 
Medicine (via ACHE consortium of eight predominantly Black colleges in 
Alabama), and 3) Off-campus Employment. 

Coop Program No. 1 (VISITING STUDENT) 
VISITING STUDENT. An arrangement exists with Alabama A&M 
University, Athens State College, John C. Calhoun State Community Col- 
lege, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, and Oakwood College. 
Under this arrangement, a student at any of the participating institutions may 
request permission to attend a class at one of the other schools. Conditions 
governing the granting of permission include the following: 

1. The student must be a full-time student. 

2. The student must have an overall C average. 

3. The course desired must be unavailable at the student's home 
institution. 

4. The student's request must be approved by his advisor and other 
appropriate personnel. 



44 Oakwood College 

5. Permission of the institution teaching the course is dependent upon 
availability of space for the visitor after its own students are accom- 
modated. 

Any student interested in participating in the Visiting Student Program 
should contact the Dean of Academic Affairs for information and procedures 
to be followed. 

Coop Program No. 2 (ARCHITECTURE, ENGINEERING, AND VETERINARY 

MEDICINE THROUGH ACHE CONSORTIUM) I 

ARCHITECTURE. Students enrolling in the Three-Two Cooperative 
Cumculum in Architecture should complete the first three academic years at r 

Oakwood College while pursuing a strong, liberal arts program with con- 
centrations in the physical sciences, art, and the social sciences Upon U 
successful completion of this three-year architectural science curriculum 
the students should transfer to the Tuskegee Institute School of Architecture *- 
and take courses in architecture for two years. Students successfully com- 
pleting this five-year program will be awarded the Bachelor of General 
Studies degree from Oakwood College and the Bachelor of Arts degree in 
Architectural Science from Tuskegee Institute. 

ENGINEERING. Students who enroll in the Three-Two Cooperative 
Engineering Curriculum should complete the first three academic years at 
Oakwood College and pursue a strong liberal arts program with emphasis on 
physics and mathematics. Upon successful completion of this three-year 
Pre-Engineenng Curriculum, the student should transfer to Tuskegee Insti- 
tute and specialize in either Mechanical Engineering or Electrical Engineer- 
ing for two years. Students successfully completing this cooperative pro- 
gram of courses will receive a Bachelor of General Studies degree from 
Oakwood College and a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering from ' 

Tuskegee Institute. 

VETERINARY MEDICINE THROUGH ACHE CONSORTIUM Stu- ro- 

dents who enroll in the Two-Four Cooperative Veterinary Medicine pro- 
gram should complete the first two academic years at Oakwood College and L 
pursue the following Pre-veterinary Medicine Curriculum as outlined in this 
bulletin. 

Coop Program No. 3 (OFF-CAMPUS EMPLOYMENT) 
EMPLOYMENT at off-campus businesses or professional establish- 
ments while also receiving academic credit for such employment is available *- 
upon prior approval. Read also in this bulletin under "Counseling Center" 
for more details, page 40. (Inquire at Counseling Center for applications.) L 
GRADUATE STUDIES AT OAKWOOD COLLEGE 
During the summer of 1979 Loma Linda University conducted its 
Masters of Public Health Program (MPH) on the Oakwood College campus. 
Beginning the summer of 1980 Andrews University, along with its Theolog- 
ical Seminary, began offering courses leading to master's degrees in educa- 

([ 
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Admission Standards 45 

tion and/or religion. For more information concerning this program, write to 
the Office of the Dean of Academic Affairs. 

ADMISSION STANDARDS 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Oakwood College welcomes applications from young people regard- 
less of race, color, creed, or national origin. Direct all correspondence on 
admission to: Director of Admissions, Oakwood College, Huntsville 
Alabama 35896. 

ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN STANDING 

In order to qualify for freshman standing, the following standards must 
be met: 

1 . Graduation from an approved secondary school . 

2. Character references, preferably from secondary school principal, 
guidance counselor, or residence hall dean if you graduated from a 
boarding school. 

3. Minimum of three units of English, two units of mathematics, two 
units of science, two units of social studies, and two units of foreign 
language. (Overall minimum of eighteen units from secondary 
school). 

4. At least a "C" average in the fields mentioned above and transcript 
of such work. 

5. An overall high school grade point average of 2.50 on a 4.00 scale is 
required to enroll in the Nursing program. 

6. Results of ACT (American College Test) scores. 

7. Medical report. 

8. Commitment to the rules and standards of the college. 
Nursing and teacher education students should refer to their respective 

departmental requirements for admission , acceptable progress and academic 
probation stipulations. 

HOW AND WHEN TO APPLY 

It is highly recommended to begin applying to Oakwood during the last 
term of your senior year or several months before the date you plan to enroll. 

1. Return application form and all materials named above (See "Ad- 
mission to Freshman Standing"). 

2. Immediately after you receive your "acceptance," applicants 
should mail a room deposit of $50 to Admissions Office. 

3. Send latest wallet size photograph if available. 
ADMISSION TO ADVANCED PLACEMENT FOR FRESHMEN 

Oakwood College will consider requests for advanced placement of 
freshmen from any secondary school graduate who believes that he qualifies 



46 



Oakwood College 



for such status. Final decisions on all awards of credit, or advanced place- 
ment, are made by the Academic Policies Committee on the merits of each 
individual case. Petition should be made to the Dean of the College for 
recommendation to the committee. 

To be considered eligible for advanced placement, the student should 
have: 

1. A grade point average of at least 3.0 on the four-point scale in 
secondary courses other than art, music, physical education, driver 
training, and vocational courses. 

2. A satisfactory score on the Advanced Placement Examinations of 
the Educational Testing Service in the areas of the courses taken. 

3. Satisfactory evaluation by the English Department on his ability to 
write and speak the English language. 

Areas in which courses may be taken are American history, biology, 
chemistry, European history, French, German, Spanish, literature, English 
composition, mathematics, and physics. 

Such credit is evaluated in terms of degree requirements on the same 
basis as transfer credit. 

Students in high schools who plan to attend Oakwood College and who 
demonstrate proficiency in a field of study by having passed one or more of 
the Advanced Placement examinations will be given credit for college 
courses where proficiency has been ascertained. 

Each academic department of the College recognizes the placement 
value of these examinations and has designated the specific courses which 
may be credited to the student's record, when a student presents evidence of 
having passed the examination. 

ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Students wishing to transfer to Oakwood College from another college 
or university must follow the same application procedure as other students. 
The college from which the student is transferring should forward to the 
Registrar an official transcript and a statement of honorable dismissal. 
Transfer credits may be applied toward the requirements for a degree when 
the student will have satisfactorily completed a minimum of twelve quarter 
hours in residence. A maximum of ninety-six quarter hours may be accepted 
from a junior college. A student transferring from another college will be 
given credit only for work completed with grades of "C" or above. 
Background deficiencies revealed by transcripts and entrance examination 
will be given individual attention. 

Transfer from Unaccredited Colleges. Such students having a grade 
point average of at least C may be accepted on a probationary basis, in which 
case their previous credit will be validated only after the successful comple- 
tion of a quarter's work of at least 12 hours at Oakwood College. 

Credit from unaccredited colleges, including correspondence schools, 
may be accepted on the following conditions: 



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Admission Standards 47 

1. The credit must be C or above. 

2. Such credit will be accepted only after the successful completion of 
at least a quarter in residence with a minimum load of 12 hours. 

3. Validating examinations may be required for such credits at the 
discretion of the Dean of Academic Affairs. 

Religion Requirements for Transfer Students. Freshmen must take 
16-20 hours as specified on page 67 under Basic Requirements. Sophomores 
15-16 hours, Juniors 11-12, and Seniors 7-8. All who enter as sophomores, 
juniors, and seniors must include RE 1 1 1 (Life and Teachings of Jesus) as 
one of their courses. If a student has not had two units of Bible in High 
School, he must include also RE 101 (Introduction to the Bible) as one of his 
courses. 

Nursing Requirements for Transfer Students: Students must refer to 
Nursing section in the Bulletin for requirements. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Special students accepted to the College fall under the following 
categories: 

(a) POST BACCALAUREATE — refers to a student with a 
bachelor' s degree who is enrolled for part-time or full-time work . 

(b) UNCLASSIFIED — applies to any student who meets admission 
standards (but who has no present plans to pursue a degree) or to a 
student whose classification cannot be determined at the time of 
admission. 

(c) NON-DEGREE — refers to a student who has not met college 
admission requirements. 

(d) TRANSIENT ADMISSION — applies to a student submitting 
evidence that he or she is in good and regular standing in an 
accredited college or university but who desires temporary admis- 
sion to Oakwood College for one quarter, the grades and credits of 
which will be transferred to his or her original institution. 

(e) HIGH SCHOOL HONOR STUDENTS — (Inquire at the Dean's 
Office for details). 

(f) VISITING STUDENTS — (See this bulletin under "Cooperative 
Programs" for details). 

HEALTH RECORD 

The Physical Examination Record and the Dental Examination Record 
are required of all new students prior to their admission to the College. These 
forms must be completed by a competent physician and a competent dentist. 
They are included in the application booklet obtainable from the Admissions 
Office. 

ALL NEW STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO SUBMIT EVIDENCE 
OF A RECENT PHYSICAL EXAMINATION BEFORE ADMISSION. 



48 Oakwood College 

The Student Medical Expense Fund will provide some financial assist- 
ance to the student each quarter he/she is enrolled taking eight or more 
quarter hours. This financial assistance is available in case of accident or 
injury requiring Hospital Emergency Room service and/or hospitalization 
for illness or injury. See Health Service (page 37) for further details. 

ADMISSION OF VETERANS 

The College is approved as an institution qualified to offer education to 
veterans under the provisions of The Veterans Readjustment Act of 1966. 

Admission to full freshman standing is possible for those veterans who, 
failing to meet the entrance requirements in the regular ways, may qualify on 
the following points: 

1 . The candidate must have completed two years of secondary school 
work or its equivalent. 

2. The candidate must take the General Educational Development test, 
making a total score of 225, a minimum of 45 on any one test. 

If the candidate falls below a score of 45 in any one field, he must 
register for at least 1 unit of work on the secondary level in that field. These 
steps must be taken prior to entrance into college. In addition to the ACT, the 
candidate is given the ACE Psychological Examination and the Cooperative 
English test. If satisfactory scores are achieved on this battery of tests, the 
applicant may be admitted to freshman standing. 

Veterans who are eligible to obtain High School Equivalency certifi- 
cates from a state in which they reside are urged to do so. 

In general, a veteran should secure his Certificate for Education and 
Training from his regional office before coming to college. If the veteran has 
failed to get his certificate and cannot do so in time to get his authorization 
before the opening date of school, he may file his application through the 
College Counseling Service. Records of Educational Achievement while in 
the Armed Services (Form 100) should be submitted to the Records Office 
for evaluation. 

ADMISSION OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

Oakwood College is approved by the U.S. Office of Immigration for 
the admission of nonimmigrant students. However, no student should leave 
his country with the intention of enrolling at this college until a letter of 
acceptance and an 1/20 Form have been issued to him by the Office of 
Admissions. To obtain these documents each international student must 
fulfill the following: 

1. Meet the normal college entrance requirement. 

2. Show evidence of proficiency in the English language. 

3. Submit an official document of financial support. 

4. Submit an advance deposit of $1,300. 



Academic Policies 49 



Please note also the following immigration regulations: 

A nonimmigrant student applying for admission to the United States for the first time after 
being issued an F-1 (student's) visa, will not be admitted unless he intends to attend the 
school specified in that visa. Therefore, if before he departs for the United States the student 
decides to attend some other school, he should communicate with the issuing American 
consular office for the purpose of having such other school specified in the visa. Any other 
nonimmigrant student will not be admitted to the United States unless he intends to attend the 
school specified in the Form I-20 or Form I-94 which he presents to the immigration officer at 
the port or entry. 

A nonimmigrant student who does not register at the school specified in his temporary 
entry permit (Form I-94), or whose school attendance is terminated, or who takes less than a 
full course of study, or who accepts unauthorized employment, thereby fails to maintain his 
status and must depart from the United States immediately. 

WITHDRAWAL PROCEDURE 

When a student decides to discontinue his course of study, he should 
complete a Change of Program voucher, which may be secured from the 
Records Office. Other regulations in this respect are listed under the 
captions "Change of Program," "Refunds," and "Checkout Proce- 
dures." In addition, dormitory students should leave a Dormitory Depar- 
ture card, properly completed, with the Dean of the home. These cards serve 
as a basis for issuing credit on accounting records. 

Students accepted on the Work Scholarship Plan should make arrange- 
ments for changes in their original contract with the head of the Department 
and also with the Director of Student Finance. 

ACADEMIC POLICIES 

THE ACADEMIC YEAR 

The academic or college year starts in September and ends in August. 
When reference is made to courses offered in even- or odd- numbered years, 
it is intended to indicate the year beginning in September. The academic year 
consists of three quarters, each of which covers a period of approximately 
eleven weeks and a summer session of six weeks. 

COURSE NUMBERS AND SYMBOLS 

Courses of instruction are classified as lower division and upper divi- 
sion. Lower division courses are numbered 100 through 299. Upper division 
courses are numbered 300 through 499. Courses numbered 1 through 99 are 
noncredit courses but may be required of certain students . 

The lower division courses are open to freshmen and sophomores and 
should be completed before the student progresses to the junior and senior 
years. See Admission to the Upper Division. 

Code to course symbols are: 

AR — Art CH — Chemistry 

BA — Business Admin. CO — Communications 

BE — Business Education ED — Education 

BI — Biology EN — English 

BL — Biblical Languages GE — Geography 

BS — Behavioral Science HE — Home Economics 



50 Oakwood College 

HI — History PH — Physics 

IN — Independent Studies PS — Political Science 

MA — Mathematics PY — Psychology 

ML — Modern Languages RE — Religion 

MU — Music SO — Sociology 

NU — Nursing SW — Social Work 

PE — Physical Education VE — Vocational Education 

COURSE SCHEDULES 

Each year the College publishes a Schedule of Classes which lists the 
courses offered, the time of meetings, the rooms, and the instructors. 

The College reserves the right to cancel any course offered for which 
there is not an enrollment of at least six students, and to limit the number of 
students in a class when limited enrollment is advantageous. 

CREDIT 

The unit of credit is the quarter hour. A quarter hour is the amount of 
credit earned for the satisfactory completion of one hour a week lecture or 
recitation or at least two hours a week laboratory practice throughout one 
quarter. 

Hyphenated courses (101-102) indicate that the sequence of courses 
should be taken in order. 

4-4 indicates that the course carries four quarter hours of credit each 
quarter for two quarters, which, being hyphenated, should be taken in 
sequence. 

4,4 indicates that the course may be taken out of sequence. 

UPPER DIVISION STANDING 

A student entering his third year of college work who lacks any of the 
prescribed courses of the lower division, which are preliminary to upper 
division work for a degree, must first register for such prescribed courses of 
the lower division and then complete his program from the upper division. 

A student who has completed a two-year curriculum and later becomes 
a candidate for a degree must fulfill all the requirements for that degree, 
including entrance to upper division, requirements of the upper division, 
residence, and quality points. 

STUDY LOAD 

The normal full-time load is 12-16 credit hours per quarter. Sopho- 
mores, juniors, and seniors may register for 18 credits if their cumulative 
grade point average or previous quarter grade point average is 3 .00 (B) . Only 
Seniors with a GPA of 2.50 or above may be permitted to take 18-22 hours 
maximum. Courses being taken by Home Study Correspondence or at 
another school (visiting student program) are included to make up your 
TOTAL STUDY LOAD during any quarter. Class load for SUMMER 
SCHOOL is: 12 hours (full load), 16 hours (maximum load), "B" average 
necessary to take 13-16 hours. 



[ 



L 



[ 

c 

[ 



[ 



Academic Policies 5 1 

Students living in college residence halls may not register for fewer 
than 9 quarter hours without permission of the Dean of Student Affairs. 
Students are not permitted to add to their load by giving or receiving 
instruction away from the College, or registering for correspondence work, 
without permission of the Academic Policies Committee. 

The following study loads will satisfy the authorities indicated. 

1. Immigration Authorities 12 quarter hours 

2. Selective Service 12 quarter hours 

3. Veterans 12 quarter hours 

4. H. E. W. 12 quarter hours 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students are classified by the Director of Admissions and Records at the 
beginning of the school year. The student's classification for the year is 
determined by the amount of credit he has earned at the beginning of the 
college year. A student who may meet the hour requirement, but whose 
cumulative grade point average is below 2.00 will be listed in the next lower 
class until his cumulative grade point average is raised to 2.00 or better. 
Student classes are organized early in the fall quarter according to the 
following levels of academic achievement: 

Freshman 0- 36 quarter hours 

Sophomore 37- 83 quarter hours 

Junior 84-128 quarter hours 

Senior 129 quarter hours 

Postgraduate Students: Students who have completed a baccalaureate 
degree and are registered for work which cannot apply toward an advanced 
degree. 

Special Students: Students who have not completed the entrance re- 
quirements and are not eligible to enroll in a degree program. 

REGISTRATION 

For all students, new and returning alike, registration includes coun- 
seling, selection of courses, and payment of fees. Students are expected to 
register on the registration date as announced in the Bulletin. A registration 
envelope with full information on procedures will be issued at the Registrar's 
Office to the student formally accepted. 

Students are not officially registered for a course until 1) their ' 'regis- 
trationform ' is turned in to the Records Office and 2) their names appear on 
the computerized class rosters of the teachers. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

Permission to register late must be obtained from the Academic Dean. 
Students failing to register during the scheduled registration periods will be 
assessed a late registration fee of $25. Class periods missed because of late 
registration will be counted as absences from the class. Ordinarily, no 



52 

Oakwood College 



student will be allowed to register after the designated days have passed. All 
classwork missed must be made up to the teacher's satisfaction. 

Permission to register late should ordinarily be obtained before registra- 
tion day. In any case the Dean must be presented satisfactory evidence to 
indicate that it was not possible for the student to register on the designated 
date. 

DROP, ADD, WITHDRAWAL 

If you think you want to add or drop a class or change a section after 
having completed registration for credit or audit, follow the procedures: 

Drop. Before the deadline (and sixth week of instruction), 1) Get a drop 
voucher from the Registrar's Office or student Record's Office, 2) Fill it out 
and secure all proper signatures, 3) Return the voucher to the Registrar's 
Office immediately, for the effective date is not that written on the voucher 
but the date on which it is turned in to the Registrar, 4) Expect a "W" 
(withdrew) for the class if you drop before the sixth- week deadline, a "WP' ' 
(withdrew passing) or "WF" (withdrew failing) if you drop after the 
deadline, 5) Forgetting or failing to drop officially through processing a 
voucher will result in an automatic "WF" or other final grade based on 
classwork completed, 6) Drops are not permitted during the last two (2) 
weeks before final exams of a quarter, and 7) Refunds for dropped classes 
are discussed in this bulletin under the heading of "Refunds." 

Add. By or before the last day of registration, follow the same steps 
(1-3) as listed above under "Drop." Courses may not be added after 
registration closes although more time is allowed for dropping. 

A charge of $5 . 00 is made for each change of schedule except when the 
change is made necessary by a) cancellation of a scheduled class orb) change 
of class time which renders it impossible for the student to maintain his or her 
original schedule. 

PRE-EXAMINATION WEEK 

Pre-examination Week is the week that precedes the final quarter 
examinations. During this week, no off-campus field trips, major examina- 
tions or extracurricular activities requiring student participation may be 
scheduled. This week should enable students to devote full time to the 
completion of course projects and to prepare for final examinations. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Finals. All students must take the final examination in each course at 
the time listed in the official time schedule or no credit will be granted for the 
course. Exceptions may be made only by the Dean of the College. Should the 
examination schedule require a student to complete four examinations in one 
day, arrangements may be made with the dean to complete one of the 
examinations at another time. "Exam Permits," representing paid financial 
accounts, are required for taking finals. 



Academic Policies 



53 



SPECIAL EXAMS 

A student who presents satisfactory evidence of having competency or 
exposure in a certain area covered by a required course may meet an 
academic requirement by passing a waiver examination, an examination for 
credit, or the CLEP examination. Each of these examinations should be 
equal in scope and difficulty to a final examination in the course. 

Not more than forty-eight (48) hours of the total credit hours required 
for graduation may be earned by the examination for credit and/or the CLEP 
subject examination. The deadline for seniors challenging a course by 
examination is the mid- term of the Winter Quarter. 

The various departments concerned will decide what subjects are open 
for examination for credit. The student must obtain a score on any such 
examination which would equate with a "C" grade in the course in order to 
be eligible for credit or waiver. 

A student may not take a more advanced course in a given area while 
waiting for permission from the Academic Policies Committee to sit for a 
lower level course. No credit will be recorded until the student has earned at 
least twelve (12) hours at Oak wood with a minimum GPA of 2.00. 

Grades below "D" may not be changed by these examinations. A 
student may not take a proficiency examination for credit for the same course 
more than once. 

Examination/or Waiver. Students who present satisfactory evidence of 
having competence in an area covered by a required course may apply to the 
Academic Policies Committee to take an examination for waiver. After 
being given approval by the Committee and having paid $25.00 to the 
Accounting Office as an examination fee (nonrefundable) the student will be 
administered the examination. If he earns a satisfactory score on the exami- 
nation, the required course may be waived and he will be allowed to 
substitute some other course in its place. Hour credit toward graduation 
cannot be earned by this examination. 

Examination/or Credit. If the student can present satisfactory evidence 
of a background of formal study or competency in any area of the cur- 
riculum, he may be permitted by the Academic Policies Committee to sit for 
a comprehensive examination covering the requirements for any such course 
taught at Oakwood and receive hour credit toward graduation. If such an 
exam is not available at Oakwood through CLEP, then the appropriate 
department prepares an exam. Upon approval of the Committee, the student 
will pay to the Accounting Office the tuition based on $20.00 per hour of 
credit offered by the course. This fee is not refundable. The grade earned on 
the examination will be recorded. 

If your special exam is for a course already taken for which you 
received a final grade, it will be administered only during any quarter 
following the quarter for which the final grade was received. 

CLEP — College Level Examination Program. Oakwood College 
grants the appropriate credit for each subject exam passed in this program by 



i 



54 



Oakwood College 



the College Entrance Examination Board. The following statements sum- 
marize the program: 

1 . The recommended maximum number of CLEP credits a student 
may apply toward graduation is forty-eight (48) quarter hours. 

2. In each major the maximum number of CLEP SUBJECT EXAMI- 
NATION credits a student may earn is determined by the major 
department. 

3. In the case of the core requirements, the Academic Policies Com- 
mittee will determine which courses can be taken by the CLEP 
EXAMINATION and how much credit a student may earn from the 
basic core requirements without overlapping in the subject area. 

4. The minimum scores listed below must be acquired before credit 
can be granted. 

5 . Acceptable CLEP scores shall earn corresponding course credit , but 
no letter grade shall be assigned or quality points considered. 

6. Once CLEP credit is placed on the transcript, a student may not 
repeat the course for which credit was given by examination for a 
grade. 

Incoming students wishing to take the CLEP test before entering 
Oakwood College must have the approval of the Office of the 
Registrar before the test is taken. 

All CLEP scores previously obtained at another school are subject to 
review by the Office of Admissions. 

A fee that will cover the cost of the examination and its administra- 
tion will be charged each student desiring to take the CLEP exami- 
nation at Oakwood College. 
The following table lists the CLEP SUBJECT EXAMINATIONS and 
corresponding courses and minimum credits acceptable at Oakwood Col- 
lege: 



7. 



8, 



9. 



CLEP SUBJECT 

American Government 
American History. 
American Literature 
Analysis and Interpretation 

of Literature 
Biology 

Calculus and Elementary Functions 
College Algebra 

College Algebra — Trigonometry 
College Composition 
Computers and Data Processing 
Educational Psychology 
Elementary Computer Programming 

FORTRAN IV 
English Literature 
General Chemistry 



SCORE* COURSE EQUIVALENT 

47 PS 211 (4 hours) 

47 HI 211, 212 (8 hours) 

46 EN 301, 302 (8 hours) 

49 Elective Credit (4 hours) 

46 BI 121-122-123 (12 hours) 

47 MA 201-202 (8 hours) 

50 MA 1 1 1 (4 hours) 
49 Elective (4 hours) 

47 * EN 101-102(8 hours) 

46 BA 111, 112, 113 (4 hours) 

47 ED 221 (4 hours) 

48 Business Administration 

Elective Credit (4 hours) 

45 EN 211 (4 hours) 

48 CH 111-112-113 (12 hours) 



Academic Policies 55 

General Psychology 47 PY 101 (4 hours) 

History of American Education 46 ED 351 (4 hours) 

Human Growth and Development 45 ED 31 1 (4 hours) 

Introduction to Business Management 47 BA 381 (4 hours) 
Introductory Accounting 47 BA 121-122-123 (4 hours) 

Introductory Business Law 51 B A 491 (4 hours) 

Introductory Economics 47 BA 281-282 (8 hours) 

Introductory Marketing 48 B A 4 1 1 (4 hours) 

Introductory Sociology 46 SO 101 (4 hours) 

Money and Banking 48 Business Administration 

Elective Credit (4 hours) 
Statistics 49 MA 307 (4 hours) 

Tests and Measurements 46 ED 361 (4 hours) 

Trigonometry 49 MA 112 (4 hours) 

Western Civilization 50 HI 103, 104 (8 hours) 

* Scores will be revised when the minimum scores from CLEP have been officially 
changed. 

GRADES AND REPORTS 

Grade reports are issued to the student and to the parents or guardians at 
the end of each quarter provided the student's account is in order. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Only quarter grades are recorded on the student's permanent record in 
the college. The following system of grading and grade point values is used. 

Grade Points 
Grade Per Hour 

A (superior) 4.0 

A- 3.7 

B+ 3.3 

B (above average) 3.0 

B- 2.7 

C+ 2.3 

C (average) 2.0 

C- 1-7 

D+ 1-3 

D (below average) 10 

D- 0.7 

F (failure) 0.0 

FA (failure due to absences) 0.0 

I (incomplete) 0.0 

W (withdrew) 

WF (withdrew failing) 

WP (withdrew passing) 

AU (audit) 

NC (non- credit) 



56 Oakwood College 

GRADE POINT AVERAGE 

The grade point average (GPA) for the quarter is computed by totaling 
the grade points earned in all courses attempted and dividing by the total 
hours attempted. Credits for which an F or WF are received are included in 
calculating the grade point average. The symbols WP, AU and NC are 
disregarded in computing the grade point average. Incompletes are included 
in the GPA. 

PASS OR FAIL PROCEDURES 

To qualify for taking courses on a pass-fail basis a student must be a 
sophomore, junior, or senior, and must not be on academic probation. The 
total number of hours that may be taken on this basis is 16. The pass-fail 
system applies to elective courses only. 

Approval for the P-F option should be obtained at the Records Office 
before the close of late registration. Registration changes in the process are 
final as of the last day to drop without academic penalty. 

NOTE: Some graduate and professional schools treat the "P" as a 

"D." 

DEAN'S LIST 

Students with a minimum grade point average of 3.5, who carry a 
minimum of 15 quarter hours with no grade below a B, and no incompletes, 
are eligible for membership on the dean's list. 

HONOR ROLL 

Students who carry a minimum of 12 hours and who maintain a grade 
point average of 3 . 00 , or above , during a given quarter with no grade below a 
"C" shall be considered HONOR STUDENTS for the quarter. 

HONORS CONVOCATION 

To give formal and public recognition for outstanding scholastic 
achievement, loyalty to College standards, and exemplary citizenship, the 
College conducts an annual Honors Convocation. To be eligible for partici- 
pation the student must have a cumulative grade point average of not less 
than 3.50 for a minimum of 24-32 hours earned at Oakwood College or a 
cumulative GPA of 3.25, and a minimum of 33 hours earned at O.C. 

GRADUATION WITH DISTINCTION 

Students are graduated with honors under the following conditions: 

Honorable Mention. A student must have a grade point average of 3.0. 

Cum Laude. A student must have a grade point average of 3.25. 

Magna Cum Laude. A student must have a grade point average of 3 . 50. 

Summa Cum Laude . A student must have a grade point average of 3 . 75 , 
or above. 

INCOMPLETE WORK 

When at the end of a quarter a student is behind in his or her classwork, 
the teacher does not automatically grant a grade of "I" to that student for 



Academic Policies 57 

more time to do the requirements. If, however, because of interruptive 
illness or other unavoidable circumstances, a student should desire the 
privilege of receiving a grade of "I" (Incomplete) to allow more time to 
fulfill class requirements, that student may apply for such a temporary grade 
by doing all of the following before the end of final exam week: 

1. Pick up and fill out a "Request and Authorization for INCOM- 
PLETE" form from the Dean's Office. 

2. Attach thereto a doctor's statement if the reason is medical, and 

3. Get the signatures of the class instructor, the instructor's department 
head, and the Academic Dean. 

4. Return the form to the Dean's Office and receive an answer from the 
Dean before leaving the campus. 

When an "I" is received, it may be changed to a regular grade when 
and if the classwork is completed not later than the extension deadline set by 
the teacher and/or the Academic Dean. Such a deadline might range any- 
where from a few days to several weeks but no longer than the sixth week of 
the next quarter even when the student is not registered the next quarter. The 
' T ' automatically converts to an ' 'F' ' if not removed within the prescribed 
time. Should more time because of further illness or unavoidable cir- 
cumstances be needed to make up your incomplete work, you may, before 
the deadline expires, request in writing an extension of time from the 
Academic Policies Committee. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION 

All students whose cumulative grade point average (GPA) is less than 
2.00 shall be placed on academic probation. Retained at Oak wood College 
under restricted privileges, students whose grade point average is less than 
1.75 must take part in the Special Instruction Program (SIP) conducted by 
our Inner College Service. Failure of such students to take part in the SIP 
may result in dismissal from the College. Students below 2.00 who fail to 
make acceptable progress in the estimation of the institution will be dropped. 

When a student is dropped for the first time because of poor scholar- 
ship, he or she is not eligible to be considered for readmission or reaccep- 
tance until after the end of two (2) quarters from the date of dismissal. When 
dropped the second time, the student becomes eligible for readmission or 
reacceptance after one (1) calendar year from the date of dismissal during 
which time the student must have attended another accredited college for at 
least one quarter, carrying a minimum of 12 quarter hours with no grade 
lower than "C." In both cases, to be so considered, the student must present 
a request to the Admissions Office. 

A student whose cumulative GPA is below 2.0 is denied permission to 
represent the College in any official capacity or hold office in any student 
organization. 

The following is a summary list of requirements for a student on 
academic probation (GPA below 2.0): 



L 



58 Oakwood College 

1. Limit registration to class load of 14 or less hours per quarter. 

2. Include in class load at least one course in which he or she has 
received a "D" or "F" and/or enroll in a remedial course as 
counseled by the academic advisor, and 

3. Go to the Inner College Service for assistance. 

INNER COLLEGE 

Inner College is an academic support service which exists for the 
purpose of helping students who need assistance in any academic endeavor. 
This is accomplished by peer-tutoring and academic advisement under the 
supervision of a full-time counselor-coordinator. The center also maintains a 
wide variety of media materials and individualized study guides. The student 
(peer) tutors are generally upperclassmen recommended by the various 
departments. 

The Center is located on the ground floor of Cunningham Hall and is 
open during the day and evening hours in order to accommodate all students 
desiring such assistance. 

REPEATED COURSES 

Occasionally students express an interest in repeating a course if the 
earned grade cannot apply toward graduation or for other reasons. 

A student may repeat a course in which he has a grade of "C" only by 
permission of the Academic Policies Committee. 

A student who has earned a grade of "D" in a major, minor, cognate, 
or in other required courses may, on the advice of his major professor, repeat 
the course or take another course in the same area, if it is recommended. In 
either case, the professor expresses his desire in writing. 

The student who repeats a course is required to register in the regular 
way, repeat all the work of the course, including laboratory requirements 
and other required activities. 

If a student repeats a course, he may receive whatever grade he earns, 
but he may not repeat the course for credit more than once, unless the most 
recent final grade is "F." 

Each time a course is taken the student's record will show the hours for 
which he registered and the grade points earned. 

When a student is granted permission to repeat a course in which a 

failing grade has previously been recorded, his GPA will be computed on the 

basis of the final grade earned. However, both grades will appear on his 

transcript. 

REMEDIAL CLASSES 

Credit hours for remedial work are not applied toward graduation. 

AUDITING COURSES 

Students may audit courses only by permission of the Academic Dean 
and the instructor concerned. 

Those who are interested in such courses should register at the time of 
the regular registration. 



L 



^ 



Academic Policies 59 

No credit is given for a course audited. 
The tuition charged is one-half the regular charge for credit. 
Laboratory courses may not be audited. 

A course started on the auditing basis cannot be changed to a credit 
basis after the first week of the course. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

No student shall take work by correspondence or enroll in another 
institution of higher learning while registered at Oakwood College without 
permission from the Academic Policies Committee. 

CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION WORK 

Oakwood College recognizes and accepts credit for courses taken with 
the Home Study Institute, which is the Extension Division of the Associated 
Colleges of Seventh-day Adventists. 

A maximum of 18 quarter hours ( 1 2 semester hours) of correspondence 
work or extension work credit may apply toward a baccalaureate degree 
program and twelve hours toward a two-year terminal program. 

Ordinarily a student will be permitted to carry correspondence or 
extension work while in residence only if the required course is not obtaina- 
ble at the college. 

It is not recommended that seniors do any correspondence or extension 
work. In cases where this is an absolute necessity, the official transcript for 
the work completed must be in the Registrar's Office before April 15 of the 
quarter in which graduation is expected. 

All correspondence or extension work, whether taken while in resi- 
dence or during the summer, MUST BE APPROVED IN advance by the 
Academic Policies Committee and Registrar respectively. Appropriate 
forms may be obtained from the Registrar's Office. 

Correspondence and extension credit with a "D" grade is unaccepta- 
ble. No correspondence credit will be entered upon the student's record until 
he has earned a minimum of 16 hours in residence with an average of at least 
"C '' 

In no case may more than 17 hours of combined residence, correspond- 
ence and/or extension work be carried in a quarter without the approval of the 
Academic Policies Committee. 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

The College conducts summer school when a sufficient number of 
students pre-register during the previous winter quarter. Full class study load 
for the summer is 12 hours. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors may register 
for 13-16 hours if cumulative grade point average is 3.00 (B). For detailed 
information relative to the offerings, charges, etc. , write to the Director of 
Admissions. 

TRANSIENT LETTERS 

When an Oakwood student of regular standing finds it necessary to drop 
out of attendance for one quarter but desires to register at another college or 



60 Oakwood College 

university, he or she may request a "transient letter" from the Academic 
Policies Committee which recommends the student for temporary admission 
to that other school without the student's having to go through normal 
admission requirements. Transient letters, however, are not granted for 
attendance at colleges or universities within a fifty-mile radius of Huntsville. 
Transient credit with grades below "C" is unacceptable. Students from 
other schools desiring transient admission to Oakwood must provide official 
support from the home institution. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

The Records Office releases transcripts of a student's work at the 
college only upon the student's written request. Telephone requests cannot 

be honored. 

A student may secure an unofficial transcript for his use, but official 
transcripts must be sent directly to other colleges, organizations, and other 
approved sources. Official transcripts normally cannot be handcarried with- 
out prior permission of the receiving institution; however, if permission is 
granted, the transcript will be delivered in a sealed envelope. 

The college reserves the right to withhold all information concerning 
the record of any student who has unpaid accounts or other charges or who is 
delinquent in payment of student loans. No exceptions will be made. 

Two weeks from the time we receive your request should be allowed for 
the processing and mailing of the transcript. Official transcripts from other 
institutions which have been presented to Oakwood for admission and 
evaluation of credit become the property of Oakwood and are not reissued or 
copied for release. Each student is entitled to one (1) official transcript 
without charge. A fee of $2.00 is charged for each additional transcript. 

ATTENDANCE REGULATIONS 

Regular and prompt attendance at all classes, chapel exercises, wor- 
ships, and work assignments is expected of all students. Lack of attendance, 
therefore, implies lack of cooperation with the requirements of the College. 

CLASS ABSENCES 

Oakwood College operates under the following principles: 

It is the responsibility of each instructor to interpret the College policies 
concerning attendance and to make his interpretations known to his students 
at the beginning of each course. Every instructor has the right to count class 
participation including attendance in calculating the term grade. It is the 
responsibility of the student to keep a record of his absences, to keep himself 
informed of the requirements of the instructor, to take all examinations at the ~ 

time prescribed by the instructor, and to turn in all assignments when they 
are due. 
Other than the above, the following regulations are in effect: 

Attendance with punctuality is required at all classes and laboratory 
appointments. No class skips are allowed. If for any reason the total number 



Academic Policies 61 

of absences is double the number of credit hours of the course per quarter, 
credit may, at the discretion of the instructor, be forfeited and a grade of 
"FA" be recorded. Absences are counted from the first official day of 
classes. Three tardinesses are equivalent to one absence. A tardiness of more 
than ten (10) minutes is considered an absence. 

Authorized leaves of absence from campus do not excuse the student 
from classes or relieve the student of required class work. The student, 
however, must make arrangements with the teacher for every anticipated 
school trip and other authorized leaves at least 48 hours before the beginning 
of such anticipated schedules. All make-up work, involving examinations 
and other class requirements, must be made up within seven (7) days after 
the absence is incurred. 

ASSEMBLY ABSENCES 

All registered students (on and off campus) are required to attend 
chapel. A student is allowed two unexcused absences from Assembly 
without penalty each quarter. A $5.00 charge will be made for each unex- 
cused absence in excess of two. 

Excuses for absences from Assembly must be submitted in writing to 
the Director of Student Affairs before the very next Assembly. Failure to do 
this will automatically result in an unexcused absence. 

Permanent excuses from Assembly may be granted in the case of 
unavoidable work responsibilities. In order to be eligible for a permanent 
excuse for a quarter, a written request, signed by the work supervisor, must 
be submitted to the Director of Student Affairs within 21 days of each 
quarter. 

ERRORS AND CORRECTIONS 

Grade reports are issued at the close of each quarter. Upon the receipt of 
a grade report , the student should carefully check it for correctness as to the 
courses recorded, credits, and grades. Any corrections needed must be taken 
care of within one week . No change will be made in the permanent record 
alter two weeks from the issue of the grade reportr- ~~~— C *q % 

ENGLISH PROFICIENCY EXAMINATIONS 

Each student is required to take a proficiency test in English during his 
junior year. This test is administered as scheduled in the calendar once 
during the fall and winter quarters. A student is allowed to take the test twice. 
If he fails to pass the test, he is required to enroll in EN 250, a two-hour 
course in English fundamentals , and to pass this course in order to qualify for 
graduation. A fee often dollars ($10.00) is charged for this test. By the end 
of the winter quarter of his senior year, a student must have passed the 
proficiency test in English or the course in English fundamentals. 

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION 

All graduating seniors are encouraged to take both the aptitude and 
advanced sections of the Graduate Record Examination, except majors in 



? 



62 Oakwood College 

Theology, Secretarial Science, Home Economics, Business Education and 
Business Administration, who will be expected to take the aptitude section. 
The Medical College Admissions Test, the Dental Aptitude Test, the Law 
School Admissions Test, the National Teachers' Examination, and the 
Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business are accepted as substitutes 
for the Graduate Record Examination. 

SEMINAR COURSES 

The only seminar courses offered are those already so labeled under 
departmental sections of the O. C. Bulletin. These require regular class 
attendance as based on the credit hour of the course. 

RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Certain departments offer a course entitled ' 'Research and Independent 
Study" for 1 to 4 hours credit to provide qualified students an opportunity to 
work on problems or topics of special interest, to engage in research 
projects, and to do scholarly study as advanced work. Following are funda- 
mental requirements for enrolling in such a course: The student will (1) be a 
junior or senior in residence with at least a B average (3 .00) , (2) make formal 
application at the time of regular registration by conferring with the head of 
his or her major department, (3) be a major in the department in which he or 
she desires the course "Research and Independent Study," (4) receive in 
writing from the Academic Dean final approval to register for the course, (5) 
receive in writing the specific requirements and expectations of the course 
from the department head. 

STUDENT MISSIONARY PROGRAM 

Each year, several Oakwood students go to foreign lands and serve as 
missionaries. Their responsibilities range anywhere from religious leader- 
ship to teaching to industrial/vocational work. For details, contact the 
Department of Church Missions, Oakwood College. 

Following are the academic requirements for student missionaries: 

1 . The applicant must have attained at least sophomore standing (min- 
imal 36 quarter hours) with a cumulative grade point average of 
"C" (2.00) or above, and no grade below "C" in all English 
Composition and Grammar courses. 

2. The applicant must have a "B" (3.00) average or above in the 
subject area that he/she is expected to teach as a student missionary. 

3. Upon completion of a year of satisfactory service as a student 
missionary, the student shall receive four (4) hours of elective credit 
on a "pass/fail" basis in the area of "Student Foreign Service." 
Quality of service is determined by a written evaluation from im- 
mediate supervisor or appropriate official over the student mission- 
ary. The student may opt for an additional four (4) hours should 
he/she secure prior approval from an instructional department and 
the Academic Policies Committee establishing that more 



Standards for Graduation 63 

specialized mission services will be experienced such as, but not 
limited to, teaching certain academic disciplines. 

GRIEVANCE ON ACADEMIC MATTERS 

Any student who desires to express concern regarding instructional 
matters such as perceived unfairness or grading methodology or cheating or 
some misunderstanding within or without the classroom is encouraged to 
confer first with the teacher of the class and, if deemed necessary, with the 
teacher's department chairperson. The Academic Dean in such matters 
should be a last resort after the student and/or the teacher and/or the 
department head has gone over the particulars with the other two of these 
three levels of individuals. 

STANDARDS FOR GRADUATION, 

DEGREES, AND CERTIFICATES 

(B.A. and B.S.) 

DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS 

Oakwood College is a member of the Association of Seventh-day 
Adventist Colleges and Secondary Schools, and is authorized by the State of 
Alabama to confer appropriate literary degrees and honors upon its 
graduates. The College grants the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, 
Bachelor of General Studies, and Associate Degrees. 

The BACHELOR OF ARTS degree is available in these areas: Biolo- 
gy, Chemistry, English, History, Math, Music, Psychology, Religion 
Social Work, and Theology. 

The BACHELOR OF SCIENCE degree is offered in these fields: 
Accounting, Biology, Business Administration, Business Education, 
Elementary Education (with option of Special Education Concentration),' 
Home Economics, Foods and Nutrition, Early Childhood Education, Medi- 
cal Technology, Office Administration, and six additional subject areas in 
secondary education. 

Students completing specific requirements for certain two-year termi- 
nal courses are awarded degrees of ASSOCIATE IN ARTS or SCIENCE in: 
Accounting, Bible Work, Nursing, General Clerical, Office Administra- 
tion, Communications, and Child Development. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR BACCALAUREATE DEGREES 

Students meeting the following conditions are eligible for bac- 
calaureate degrees: 

General Requirements 

1. A candidate for a degree must have a satisfactory academic record 
and be of good moral character. In addition, the candidate must 
possess personal attributes which indicate that he has potential for 
leadership in his community and will reflect credit upon Oakwood 



54 Oakwood College 



College. The College reserves the sole and final right to determine 
whether the candidate possesses such personal attributes. 

2. The responsibility for meeting requirements for graduation rests 

primarily upon the student. He should acquaint himself with the ( 

requirements as outlined in the College Bulletin, and, with the aid of 

his advisor, he should plan his work so as to fulfill each one of the 
requirements. 

3 . Candidates for degrees are expected to be fully informed concerning 
degree requirements and are responsible for their fulfillment. A 
student is obligated to meet degree requirements under the bulletin 
of his or her initial registration at Oakwood. Only one other option is 

given, namely, that of choosing the current bulletin of the senior *— 

(graduating) year. In any case, the choice is to be approved by the 
major department chairperson and recorded on the senior check 
sheet. Selecting the senior year bulletin cannot be done after the fall 
quarter of the graduating year. 

Quantitative 

1. The satisfactory completion of a minimum of 192 QUARTER 
HOURS including 60 HOURS (does not include credit for remedial 
classes) at the upper division level. — 

2. The satisfactory completion of the CORE CURRICULUM re- 
quirements. 

3. The satisfactory completion of a MAJOR field of departmental 
specialization , including at least 24 hours of upper division courses . 

4. The satisfactory completion of a MINOR field of departmental w 
specialization, with at least 6 hours of upper division courses. 

Qualitative 

1 . The attainment of a CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGE 

of 2.0. 

2. The attainment of a minimum over-all grade point average of 2.0 in 
the MAJOR and MINOR fields. No grade below "C" may apply 
towards the major and/or minor. 

Residence 

1 . The satisfactory completion in residence of a minimum of 36 quarter 
hours during three consecutive quarters of the senior year. 

2 . The satisfactory completion in residence of a minimum of 30 quarter 
hours at the upper division level. 

3 . The satisfactory completion in residence of one half of the upper 
division hours in the major field. 

4. The satisfactory completion in residence of 6 hours of the upper 
division hours in the minor field. 



Standards for Graduation 65 

MAJORS AND AREAS OF STUDY 

In addition to the Core Curriculum (General Education Requirements), 
a major and a minor are required for each baccalaureate degree (associate 
degrees require no minor). These majors and minors, however, may include 
appropriate work in the Core Curriculum. A student may enroll for a double 
major in which case he or she needs no minor. If after having formally 
chosen a major a student desires to switch to another, he or she must fill out 
the "Application to Enter New Department." The following majors and 
minors are available at this college. 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREES 

APPLIED SCIENCES AND EDUCATION 

Accounting, p. 99 Oo^xApt" c<m**C«-<- 

Business Administration, p. 98 £ 

Business Education, p. 105 £<l*h»*«l< 

Early Childhood Education, p. 118 j ,JVvm>&©*\ $Lst<Mit ,/-4w , 

Elementary Education, p. 119 

Office Administration, p. 106 

Special Education, p. 120 

HUMANITIES 

Communications, p. 135 

English, p. 132 

English Education: Language Arts, p. 132 

Music, p. 166 

Music Education, p. 166 

NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 

Biology, p. 91 

Chemistry, p. Ill 

Engineering, p. 71 

Food and Nutrition, p. 154 

Home Economics, p. 152 

Home Economics Education, p. 153 

Mathematics, p. 160 

Mathematics and Computer Science, p. 161 

Medical Technology, p. 70 

Science Education, p. 96, 112 

RELIGION AND THEOLOGY 

Religion, p. 181 

Religious Education, p. 183 

Theology, p. 181 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

History, p. 146 
History Education, p. 147 
Psychology, p. 83 
Social Science, p. 147 
Social Work, p. 88 

ASSOCIATE DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 

Accounting, p. 99 Dietetics, p. 155 

Art, p. 140 General Clerical, p. 107 

Bible Instructorship, p. 184 Nursing, p. 176 

Child Development, p. 156 Office Administration, p. 106 

Church Leadership, p. 184 

Communications, p. 136 



66 Oakwood College 



MINORS SV 

y Accounting, p. 100 health and Physical Education, p. 128 

'Art, p. 142 /History, p. 146 

♦•Biblical Languages, p. 182 ^Home Economics, P,_153 .««-.«. *uuJh 

/Biology, p. 93 .^Mathematics, p. 16(f- »^<r><^ 

/Black Studies, p. 151 -Music, p. 166 

Bu o incoo -Administration, ;-p: 160 'Office Administration, p. 106 

/Chemistry, p. 112 Political Science, p. 150 

^Child Development, p. 156 ^Physics, p. 163 

^Communications, p. 136 Psychology, p. 84 ~ * 

Computer Science, p. 100 -'Religion, p. 182 _^ <s^^>v^d<^<-( Eri^c«-w— 

v. ^^Correctional Science, p. 86 ^Social Work, p. 89 
G^^^tenglish, p. 132 /Sociology, p. 87 

•Food and Nutrition, p. 154 /Theology, P- 182 

„ Gerontology, p. 86 /Urban Studies, p. 88 

DEGREE CANDIDACY / SENIOR CHECK SHEETS 

Students are considered Degree Candidates when so notified by the 
Registrar. To be eligible, the following must be satisfactorily met: 

1 . Approval of senior check sheets by major advisor and auditor for 
graduation requirements in the Office of Student Records. Check 
sheets are obtainable either from your advisor or from the Records' 
Office and must be completed and submitted to your advisor no later 
than October (fall quarter) of the year you plan to graduate. It is 
advisable to submit check sheets during the spring quarter of your 
junior year. 

2. Payment of the required graduation fee of $35 by January 3 1 of the 
senior year. 

3. Satisfactory completion of the English Proficiency Examination or 
EN 250, English Fundamentals, should you fail the examination. 
(Not a requirement for participation in Senior Presentation) . 

COMMENCEMENT 

Degree Candidates who have satisfactorily completed all requirements 
for graduation are expected to participate in the commencement exercise 
unless granted permission to graduate in absentia by the Academic Policies 
Committee. 

GRADUATION DIPLOMAS 

Diplomas for Degree Candidates are ordered by the Registrar following 
the Senior Presentation Program, and are issued at Commencement to 
graduates who have cleared all financial obligations with the College. 

SECOND BACHELORS DEGREE 

Two different degrees may be conferred at the same time if the candi- 
date has met the requirements of both degrees , and has completed a total of 
240 quarter hours of credit. The College does not grant two degrees of the 
same kind to any one person, such as two B.A.'s or two B.S.'s. Students 
may, however, earn a second degree after one degree has been conferred by 
completing an additional 48 quarter credits, meeting the- basic degree re- 



C 



Curriculum Requirements 



67 



quirements of both degrees, and the requirements of a second major and a 
second minor. 

GRADUATION IN ABSENTIA 
All degree candidates are expected to participate in the Commencement 
exercises unless permission is granted by the Academic Policies Committee 
to graduate in absentia in which case the prospective graduate pays an 
absentia fee of $20. 

GENERAL EDUCATION, CORE 
CURRICULUM, AND BASIC REQUIREMENTS 

FOR 

BACHELOR OF ARTS AND 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREES 



Liberal Arts Curriculum 

Basic Requirements or General Education Requirements 

Education and Applied Sciences 6 hours 

Required: Ed 250 and four (4) hours of course work from Accounting 
or Business Administration or Economics or Computer Science or 
Office Administration or Home Economics or Vocational Educa- 
tion. (Department heads in each of these areas to approve entrance.) 

Health and Physical Education 4 hours 

Required: PE 211 plus two (2) hours of activity courses in PE. 

Humanities 20-24 hours 

Required: EN 101-102-103, EN 201 or 211 or 212 or 301 or302,AR 
2JLZ.or MU 200, and a communications course chosen from EN 304, 
EN 351, CO 201, CO 2 11, CO 231, CO 320, CO 333. Students with an 

p. /ACT score in English of4?"H0th percentile) or above may omit EN 
101 and begin with EN 102. Such students may also elect to receive 
credit for EN 101 by a score of 50 or above on the CLEP test or by 
enrolling in and passing EN 101 on campus. (Religion and Theology 
Majors are required to take CO 201). 

Modern Foreign Languages 12 hours 

Required of all candidates for the B.A. degree including Religion 
majors. Theology majors must take Biblical Greek (20 hours — A 
minimum grade of C is required). Music majors and minors under the 
B.A. degree may substitute MU 124, 125, 126. B.S. degree candi- 
dates should select 12 elective hours as approved by the major 
advisor. 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 20 hours 

Required: BI 101, MA 101, PH 101. Remaining 8 hours elected from 
BI 102, CH 101, HE 131, or PH 102. Students with an ACT score of 
17 or above in Math or 21 or above in Natural Sciences, may omit 
one Freshman level course in each of those areas. If such students 
desire academic credit for these waived courses, they must either 
enroll in and pass these courses on campus or pass equivalent 
courses via CLEP with a score of at least 50. 

Religion and Theology 16-20 hours 

Required: RE 201 or 202 and RE 331 or HI 314. Remaining 8 hours 
not to total more than 4 hours in Applied Religion. Students not 



r 



68 Oakwood College 



having had 2 years of high school Bible are to complete RE 101, 
Introduction to the Bible, making a total of 20 hours in Religion/ 
Theology. Students transferring from other colleges as Freshmen 
must fulfill 16-20 hours in Religion; Sophomores 15-16 hours; 
Juniors 11-12; and Seniors 7-8. All who enter Oakwood as sopho- 
mores, juniors, and seniors are required to include RE 1 1 1 (Life and 
Teachings of Jesus Christ) as one of their courses. If the transfer 
student has not had two years in Bible in high school, he or she must 
include also RE 101 (Introduction to the Bible), 

Social Sciences 16 hours 

Required: HI 211 or 212 and 8 hours elected from History, Geog- 
raphy, or Political Science. Recommended: HI 103, 104, 165, 211, 
212; PS 200, 211, 220; GE 201, 202. Four (4) hours elected from 
Psychology, Social Work, or Sociology. (HI 314 satisfies Social 
Science requirements only if a student has also taken RE 331.) 
Students with an ACT score of 17 or above in Social Sciences may 
omit one course other than HI 21 1 or 212. If academic credit for the 
waived Social Science course is desired, the students must either 
enroll in and pass this course on campus or pass an approved course 
via CLEP with a score of at least 50. 

Basic requirements in some disciplines differ from the above listing. 
Consult departmental requirements. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

FOR THE 
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE 

DEGREES 

Basic Skills: Man and His Language 8-12 hours 

English 101, 102 (or 103) 

ACT score in English of 17 (or 40th percentile) permits student 
to take only 8 hours in English. 

Religious Studies: Man and His God 8 hours 

Choose two from the following: 

RE 101 

RE 111 

RE 201 

RE 202 

RE 311 

RE 312 

RE 331 
Social Sciences: Man and His Social Relations 8 hours 

Choose four hours — History or Political Science and 
four from remaining areas. 

(HI) History 

(PY) Psychology 

(SO) Sociology 

(SW) Social Work 

Physical Education: Man and Health Values 2 hours 

Activity course 

General Education Electives: Man and Applied and Fine Arts 8 hours 

(AR) Art 

(BA) Business Administration 
(BE) Business Education 
(CO) Communications 




Curriculum Requirements 69 

(ED) Education 

(HE) Home Economics 

(ML) Modern Languages (Associate of Arts major must take at least 

4 hours of modern language) 
(MU) Music 

Natural Sciences: Man and His Natural World 4 hours 

Biology or Chemistry or Mathematics or Physics 



Total 38-42 hours 

BACHELOR OF GENERAL STUDIES DEGREE 

This degree program is an alternative to the B.A. and B.S. degree 
programs. It is designed to give the student who so desires an opportunity to 
choose a broad, interdisciplinary program of studies. The B.G.S. degree 
program, with its smaller Core Curriculum requirements, provides varied 
opportunities for students to cross departmental lines in obtaining the kind of 
education that would best prepare them for future study of hybrid disci- 
plines. 

The following are the requirements of the B.G.S. degree program: 

1. A Core Curriculum of 48 QUARTER HOURS 

Behavioral and Social Sciences 12 hours 

One course must be in History 
Humanities 12 hours 

EN 101-102-103 
Natural Sciences 12 hours 

One course must be in Mathematics 
Religion 12 hours 

RE 101 or RE 111 

2. Instead of a major and a minor, the student will pursue concentrations in at least 
three disciplines of 36 hours each, with at least 16 upper division hours in each. A 
concentration in this context is defined as a unified, departmental area of study 
consisting of a minimum of 36 hours but without any specific course or cognate 
requirements. If one of the concentrations is Education, the student must choose 
either "with Teacher Training" or "without Teacher Training." 

3. The satisfactory completion of at least 90 QUARTER HOURS at the junior and 
senior levels in any fields with no grade below a "C." Not more than 30 of the 90 
upper level hours or 60 of the 192 quarter hours would be accepted from any one 
department. 

4. To be admitted to the program, students must have completed the core curriculum 
and have a grade point average of at least 2.25. 

5. To remain in this program, each student is required to have his program of study 
approved by his faculty advisor and the Academic Policies Committee no later than 
the end of his sophomore year. 

DEGREES TO MEDICAL AND OTHER 
PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS 

Students who have been accepted to accredited medical, dental, or 
optometry schools before completing requirements for an undergraduate 
degree at Oakwood College may be awarded a Bachelor of Science in 
Natural Sciences upon successful completion of the first year of medical, 



70 Oakwood College 

dental, or optometry studies provided the following conditions are met: 

1. The student must complete three years in an accredited under- 
graduate program of which at least the last year must be taken in 
residence at Oakwood College. 

2. The student must provide proof from a professional school of 
medicine, dentistry, or optometry of successful completion of the 
first year of the respective professional school. 

The B.S. in Natural Sciences is the only degree awarded to such 
students regardless of their specific major pursued while in undergraduate 
school. Students who wish to apply for this degree must do so in writing to 
the Academic Dean's Office of Oakwood College by the second week of the 
quarter during which he or she desires degree conferral. 

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM IN NATURAL 
SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING 

Dr. J. Blake, Advisor 

Oakwood College and Alabama A&M University have entered into an 
agreement whereby an undergraduate student will attend Oakwood College 
for two or more academic years, and Alabama A&M University for two or 
more academic years. After completing the programs of the two cooperating 
institutions (to be accomplished in no less than 4% years) the student shall be 
awarded a Bachelor of Natural Sciences Degree from Oakwood College and 
one of the following designated Bachelor of Science Degrees from Alabama 
A&M University: (For course requirement details, contact the Chairman of 
the Mathematics Department). 

B.S. in Electrical/Electronics Engineering Technology 

B.S. in Mechanical Engineering Technology 

B.S. in Civil Engineering Technology 

B.S. in Civil Engineering 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

AND 
TWO-YEAR / ONE-YEAR COURSES [ 

Oakwood College offers pre-professional curricula in a number of 
fields. Students planning to enter a particular professional school should 
acquaint themselves with the specific requirements of that school. The 
following curricula will satisfy the entrance requirements of many profes- I 

sional schools. 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Dr. E. A. Cooper, Advisor 

Oakwood College, Hinsdale Sanitarium and Hospital , the School of 
Medical Technology of Hubbard Hospital, Meharry Medical College, Ket- 



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Curriculum Requirements 71 

tering Memorial Hospital, and the School of Medical Technology of Florida 
Sanitarium and Hospital have established a cooperative curriculum which 
leads to the Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology from Oak- 
wood College. 

Students who enroll in this curriculum should complete the first three 
academic years at Oakwood College and the fourth year at one of the above 
cooperating institutions. Upon satisfactory completion of the one-year in- 
ternship course in Medical Technology at one of the above named institu- 
tions, the student will receive the Bachelor of Science degree from Oakwood 
College. 

A candidate for the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Medical 
Technology must fulfill the following requirements: 

1 . Complete the basic requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree 
at Oakwood College. 

2. Include the following Science and Mathematics courses in his 
program of studies: 

Courses Course Titles Hours 

BI 121-122-123 General Biology 12 

BI 221 Microbiology 5 

BL331 Histology 4 

BI 415 Biostatistics 4 

BI 440 Parasitology 4 

BI 451 Special Topics in Zoology (Immunology) 4 

CH 111-112-113 General Chemistry 12 

CH 201 Qualitative Analysis 4 

CH 301-302-303 Organic Chemistry 12 

CH 321 Quantitative Analysis 4 

CH 401, 402 Biochemistry 4,4 

MA 111-112 Pre-Calculus 4-4 

PH 111-112-113 General Physics 12 

3. Have credits approved by NAACLS (National Accrediting Agency 
for Clinical Laboratory Sciences) 222 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 
1512, Chicago, Illinois 60606. 

4. Gain admission to one of the above named institutions. 

5. Successfully complete the twelve-month internship at one of the 
above named institutions. 

PRE-ENGINEERING 

Dr. John A. Blake, Advisor 

This program would provide a means by which our students desirous of 
pursuing careers in engineering will satisfy the requirements for Walla Walla 
College and will enter the third year at Walla Walla with minimum disrup- 
tion in their academic program. We will still require students to take a course 
in Computer Science (EG 198) at UAH during the spring quarter of the 
second year in order to satisfy the computer science requirements for WWC. 



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72 



Oakwood College 





FALL 




WINTER 


SPRING 


Freshman 


EG 111 


3 hrs. 


EG 112 


3 hrs. 


EG 211 


4 hrs. 




MA 201 


4 hrs. 


MA 202 


4 hrs. 


MA 203 


4 hrs. 




CH 111 


4 hrs. 


CH 112 


4 hrs. 


CH 113 


4 hrs. 




EN 101 


4 hrs. 


EN 102 


4 hrs. 


EN 103 


4 hrs. 




PE 101 


1 hr. 


PE 102 


1 hr. 








16 hrs. 


16 hrs. 


16 hrs. 


Sophomore 


EG 212 


4 hrs. 


EG 225 


4 hrs. 


EG 226 


3 hrs. 




MA 204 


4 hrs. 


MA 311 


4 hrs. 


MA 301 


4 hrs. 




*PH 111 


4 hrs. 


*PH 112 


4 hrs. 


*PH 113 


4 hrs. 




RE 111 


4 hrs. 


RE 201 


4 hrs. 


HI 


4 hrs. 



16 hrs. 



16 hrs. 



15 hrs. 



*Physics with Calculus 



EG 111-112. INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING 

Elementary engineering design, drafting, graphics, descriptive geometry, and 
engineering problems. Familiarization with shop processes, fasteners, and dimen- 
sioning. Application of drawing principles to problems of descriptive geometry. 
Emphasis is placed on student participation in creative design processes. 

EG 211. STATICS 

Elements of statics in two and three dimensions, centroids; analysis of structures 
and machines; friction. 

EG 212. DYNAMICS 

Kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies in plane and three dimensional motion. 

EG 225-226. CIRCUIT ANALYSIS 

A foundation of electrical engineering science of circuit theory and the utilization 
of basic electrical instrumentation. 

PRE-LAW 

Prof. Clarence Barnes, Advisor 

Students interested in pre-law should counsel with the Pre-law Advisor 
concerning the entrance requirements of law schools. 

Since a college degree is necessary for admission to most law schools, it 
is recommended that a student elect a major field of concentration not later 
than the beginning of the second year. Majors and minors in the fields of 
business administration, history, English, behavioral science and political 
science are generally preferred, although other majors may be acceptable. 
Electives in human physiology and anatomy and in mathematics are quite 
helpful. 

The booklet, Law Schools and Bar Admission Requirements, gives 
detailed information concerning a desirable academic background for the 
study of law. Interested students who desire a copy of this booklet should 
write to the following address: 

Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar 
American Bar Association 
1155 East Sixtieth Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60600 




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Curriculum Requirements 73 



PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL 

Chairperson Department of Biology 
Chairperson Department of Chemistry 

Students preparing for medicine should be conversant with the re- 
quirements of the medical college to which they plan to apply. They should 
be careful to include all required courses in their program of study. 

Since a college degree is necessary for admission to most medical 
schools, it is recommended that the student elect a major field of specializa- 
tion not later than the beginning of the second year. Inasmuch as training in 
scientific thinking is an invaluable asset to the study of medicine, it is 
recommended that the student major either in biology or chemistry; how- 
ever, the choice is left to the student. 

For recommendation to a medical school, a student should: 

a. Maintain a commendable record of conduct and character. 

b. Attain a grade-point average of at least 3.0 in both science and 
non-science courses. 

c. Take the medical aptitude test during the 12 months preceding 
his application. 

d . Complete the basic requirements for the baccalaureate degree . 

e. Include the following science and mathematics courses in his 
program of study: 

Courses Course Titles Hours 

BIOLOGY 

BI 121-122-123 General Biology 12 

BI 221 Microbiology 5 

BI 225 Embryology 4 

BI 380 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 5 

BI331 Histology 4 

BI 422-423 General Physiology 3,3 

BI 480 Mammalian Anatomy 5 

CHEMISTRY 

CH 111-112-113 General Chemistry 12 

CH 201 Qualitative Analysis 4 

CH 301-302-303 Organic Chemistry 12 

CH 321 Quantitative Analysis 4 

CH 322 Physical Chemistry 4 

CH 401 , 402 Biochemistry 4,4 

MATHEMATICS & PHYSICS 

MA 111-112, 113 Pre-Calculus 4-4,4 

MA 211 Survey of Calculus 4 

PH 111-112-113 General Physics 12 

The pre-dental student is required to take the Dental Aptitude Test not 
later than the January preceding the school year for which registration is 
anticipated. 



74 



Oakwood College 



PRE - A "$S!M£goW YEARS 

MISS Anne Meyer, Advisor 

Anesthesia is a four- year curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Science 
degree. After completing the pre-professional curriculum listed below and 
receiving licensure as a registered nurse, the student may enter the junior 
year of the program at Loma Linda University. A minimum grade point 
average of 2.00 is required in the 96 credits needed for admission. One may 
fulfill the entrance requirements by satisfactory completion of the following 
courses: 

Courses Course Titles Hours 

English Composition 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 12 

Humanities* 

AR 217 Art Appreciation 4 

EN 201 World Literature 4 

MU 200 Music Appreciation 4 

Natural Sciences 

Biology 
BI 111-112-113 Human Anatomy & Physiology 12 

Chemistry 
CH 101-102-103 Survey of Chemistry 12 

Mathematics 
MA 101 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics 4 

Physics 

PH 111-112-113 General Physics 12 

Social Sicences** 

HI 103 World Civilization I 4 

HI 104 World Civilization II 4 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 4 

Religion 

RE 101 Introduction to the Bible 4 

RE 1 1 1 Life and Teachings 4 

RE 201 Christian Fundamentals 4 

Electives • 1 1 

* May include Fine Arts, Foreign Language, Literature, Philosophy, Speech. 
** May include Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, 
Psychology or Sociology. 

OPPORTUNITIES: Employment opportunities for qualified nurse anesthetists exist 
in all states. Employment potentially exists in major community, 
military, and Veterans Administration hospitals and in public 
health services. 



I 






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Curriculum Requirements 



75 



PRE-DENTAL HYGIENE — TWO YEARS 

Dr. Seth Lubega, Advisor 

PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY — TWO YEARS 

Dr. Ashton Gibbons, Advisor 

PRE-OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY — TWO YEARS 

Dr. Seth Lubega, Advisor 

Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Dental Hygiene are 
four-year programs leading to the baccalaureate degree. After satisfactorily 
completing the pre-professional curriculum listed below, the student may 
enter the junior year at Loma Linda University or some other similar 
institution offering these programs: 

Courses Course Titles Hours 

Education 

ED 270 Survey of Human Development 4 

English 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 12 

CO 201 Fundamentals of Speech 4 

Humanities 

AR 217 Art Appreciation 4 

EN 201 World Literature 4 

MU 200 Music Appreciation 4 

Natural Sciences 
Biology 

BI 111, 112, 113 Human Anatomy & Physiology 4,4,4 

BI 221 Microbiology 5 

Chemistry 

CH 101-102-103 Survey of Chemistry 12 

Physics* 

PH 111-112-113 General Physics 12 

Religion 

RE 101 Introduction to the Bible 4 

RE 1 1 1 Life and Teachings 4 

RE 201 Christian Fundamentals 4 

Social Sciences 

HI 103 World Civilization I 4 

HI 104 World Civilization II 4 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 4 

SO 101 Principles of Sociology 4 

SO 211 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology and/or ... 4 

Electives 6 

For Pre-Occupational Therapy students, ceramics, general crafts, and woodwork are 
required. (LLU) 
* For Pre-Physical Therapy students only if they have not taken high school physics. 



76 



Oakwood College 



PRE-MEDICAL RECORD ADMINISTRATION — 

TWO YEARS 

Prof. Sandra Price, Advisor 

Courses Course Titles Hours 

Applied Sciences 

Business Administration 

BA 111. 112. 113 Data Processing 9 

Secretarial Sciences 

BE 111-112 Elementary Typing 4 

BE 1 13 Intermediate typing 2 

BE 140 Records Management 3 

English Composition 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 12 

Humanities 

AR 217 Art Appreciation 4 

EN 201 World Literature 4 

MU 200 Music Appreciation 4 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 

BI 111. 112, 113 Human Anatomy & Physiology 4,4,4 

Religion 

RE 101 Introduction to the Bible 4 

RE 201. 202 Fundamentals of Christian Faith 8 

Social Sciences 

HI 211, 212 U.S. History I, II 8 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 4 

Electives to complete a minimum of 96 hours 



r 



PRE-OPTOMETRY — TWO YEARS 

Prof. E. O. Jones, Advisor 

In general, two years of college work are required by optometry 
schools . A list of approved schools may be obtained by writing the American 
Optometry Association, 4030 Chouteau Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri 
63 102. Detailed entrance requirements are available from each school on the 
list. The following courses will meet the entrance requirements of most 
optometry schools: 



Courses Course Titles Hours 

First Year 

Education 

Physical Education 

PE 101 Physical Conditioning/ Slimnastics 1 

PE 102 Beginning Swimming 1 

English Composition 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 12 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
Biology 

BI 121-122-123 General Biology 12 

Chemistry 

CH 111-112-113 General Chemistry 12 



i — 



Curriculum Requirements 



77 



Mathematics 

MA 111-112 Pre-Calculus 4-4 

MA 2 1 1 Survey of Calculus 4 

Religion 

RE 101 Introduction to the Bible 4 

Second Year 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
Biology 

BI 380 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 5 

Physics 

PH 111-112-113 General Physics 12 

Social Sciences 
Psychology 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 4 

Sociology 

SO 101 Principles of Sociology 4 

Electives 15 

PRE-PHARMACY — TWO YEARS 

Mr. Anthony Paul, Advisor 

Students applying for a career in pharmacy should complete at least two 
years of college work before transferring to a college of pharmacy. Since 
entrance requirements to colleges of pharmacy vary, the student is advised to 
write to the specific school of his choice for information concerning admis- 
sion requirements (Florida A&M University, Meharry Medical College, 
Howard University, Texas-Southern University, and Xavier University). A 
list of accredited colleges of pharmacy may be secured by writing to the 
American Pharmaceutical Association, 2215 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20007. The completion of five years of college study is 
now required in order to be initially licensed to practice pharmacy in the 
United States. 

Courses Course Titles Hours 

First Year 
Education 
Physical Education 

PE 101 Physical Conditioning/Slimnastics 1 

PE 102 Beginning Swimming 1 

English Composition 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 12 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
Biology 

BI 121-122-123 General Biology 12 

Chemistry 

CH 111-112-113 General Chemistry 12 

Mathematics 

MA 111-112 Pre-Calculus 4-4 

MA 211 Survey of Calculus 4 

Social Sciences 

HI 103 World Civilization I 4 

HI 104 World Civilization II 4 

(See Social Sciences requirements, p. 67). 



78 



Oakwood College 



Second Year 

Applied Sciences 

Business Administration 
BA 281 Introduction to Economics 4 

Humanities 

AR 217 Art Appreciation 4 

MU 200 Music Appreciation 4 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
Chemistry 

CH 301-302-303 Organic Chemistry 12 

Biology 

BI 111, 112, 113 Human Anatomy & Physiology 4,4,4 

Physics 
PH 111-112-113 General Physics 12 

Social Sciences 
Psychology 
PY 101 Principles of Psychology 4 

PRE-PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE — TWO YEARS 

Dr. Justin C. Hamer, Advisor 

Public Health Science is a four-year program leading to a baccalaureate 
degree. After satisfactorily completing the pre-professional curriculum 
listed below, the student may enter the junior year at Loma Linda University 
or some other similar institution offering this program: 

Courses Course Titles Hours 

English 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 12 

CO 201 Fundamentals of Speech 4 

Humanities 

AR 217 Art Appreciation 4 

EN 201 World Literature 4 

MU 200 Music Appreciation 4 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
Biology 

BI 111, 112, 113 Human Anatomy & Physiology 4,4,4 

BI 221 Microbiology 5 

Chemistry* 

CH 101-102-103 Survey of Chemistry 12 

Home Economics 

HE 131 Nutrition 4 

Mathematics 

MA 101 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics 4 

Social Sciences 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 4 

SO 101 Principles of Sociology 4 

SO 21 1 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 4 

Electives 

BA 121-122-123 Principles of Accounting 4 

* Students planning graduate study in Public Health should take General Chemistry 
and Organic Chemistry. 



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Curriculum Requirements 



79 



PRE-DENTAL ASSISTING — ONE YEAR 

Prof. E. O. Jones, Advisor 

Dental Assisting is a two-year curriculum leading to an Associate in 
Science Degree. After satisfactorily completing the pre-professional cur- 
riculum listed below, the student may enter the sophomore year at Loma 
Linda University or some other similar institution offering this program: 

Courses Course Titles Hours 

Applied Sciences 

Business Administration* 

BA 121-122-123 Principles of Accounting 12 

Secretarial Science* 

BE 111-112 Elementary Typing 2,2 

English 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 12 

CO 201 Fundamentals of Speech 4 

Natural Sciences 

Biology 
BI 121-122-123 General Biology 12 

Chemistry 

CH 101-102-103 Survey of Chemistry 12 

Religion 

RE 101 Introduction to the Bible 4 

Social Sciences 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 4 

SO 101 Principles of Sociology 4 

* Required if the student does not have secondary credits in these courses. 

PRE-RESPIRATORY THERAPY — ONE YEAR 
PRE-X-RAY — ONE YEAR 

Dr. Seth Lubega, Advisor 

Radiological Technology and Respiratory Therapy are two-year pro- 
grams leading to the Associate in Science degree. After satisfactorily com- 
pleting the pre-professional curriculum listed below, the student may enter 
the sophomore year at Loma Linda University or some other similar institu- 
tion offering this program: 

Courses Course Titles Hours 

English Composition 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 12 

Natural Sciences 
Biology 

BI 111, 112, 113 Human Anatomy & Physiology 4,4,4 

BI 221* Microbiology 5 

Chemistry 

CH 101-102-103 Survey of Chemistry 12 

Mathematics 

MA 101 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics 4 

Physics** 
PH 111-112-113 General Physics 12 



80 Oakwood College 

Religion 

RE 101 Introduction to the Bible 4 

Social Sciences** 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 4 

* Only required for those students taking Pre-Respiratory Therapy. 
** Required if the student has not had high school physics. 

PRE-VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Dr. Ashton Gibbons, Advisor 

Courses Course Titles Hours 
English Composition 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 12 

Natural Sciences 
Biological Science 

BI 121-122-123 General Biology 12 

BI 225 Vertebrate Embryology 4 

Physical Science 

CH 111-112-113 General Chemistry 12 

CH 301-302-303 Organic Chemistry 12 

PH 111-112-113 General Physics 12 

Electives in Social Sciences and Humanities 16 

General Electives 15 

96 

Students completing this curriculum should then transfer to the School 
of Veterinary Medicine of Tuskegee Institute. Upon completion of the first 
two years of the professional curriculum in Veterinary Medicine, the student 
will receive the Bachelor of General Studies degree from Oakwood College. 
At the end of the four-year professional program in Veterinary Medicine, the 
student will receive the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from 
Tuskegee Institute. 



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m-W^M^WM0fmmff^M^MW$f'^^0&Mii%K S: 



DEPARTMENTS 

OF 

INSTRUCTION 



' 



(Oakwood reserves the right to revise course requirements within a 
given school year so long as the official change is publicly announced and 
disseminated). 

The course offerings of the college are organized in thirteen depart- 
ments of instruction: 



Behavioral Sciences 



History and Political Science 



Biology 



Home Economics 



Business Administration 



Mathematics and Physics 



Business Education and 
Office Administration 



Music 



Chemistry 



Education 



Nursing 



Religion and Theology 



English, Communications, Modern Languages and Art 



■ 



M 



Behavioral Sciences 



83 




Department of 

BEHAVIORAL 
SCIENCES 



Associate Professors: Dulan, 

Malcolm, Matthews (Head) 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, Mims, 

Phillips, Thomas, Webb 



PSYCHOLOGY (PY), SOCIOLOGY (SO) AND SOCIAL WORK (SW) 

The object of these programs is to acquaint the student with the 
principles, facts, approaches and methods of the discipline; to provide him 
with an understanding of psychology and sociology as sciences of behavior; 
and to improve his insight into his own behavior and that of others. The 
department aims to provide a good understanding of human adjustive be- 
havior, of how societies, communities and groups are organized and main- 
tained, and how the behavior of the individual is related to that of the group. 
It also seeks to introduce the student to the concepts and methods used in 
psychological and sociological research. 

No course may apply towards both a major and a minor. 

No grade below "C" may apply on a major or minor. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Psychology) 

PY 101 (Principles of Psychology) 4 hours 

PY 201 (Psychology of Religion) 4 hours 



84 



Oak wood College 



PY 301 (Social Psychology) 

PY 319 (Theories of Personality) 

PY 321 (Abnormal Behavior) 

PY 360 (Experimental Psychology I) 

PY 361 (Experimental Psychology II) 

PY 401 (History and Systems of Psychology - ) 

PY 41 1 (Principles of Research) . . * .' 

SW 330 (Human Behavior and Social Environment) 
Electives (5 hours from any of the 3 areas: 

Psychology. Sociology and Social Work) . 
(28 hours of upper division courses) 

MINOR (Field to be chosen) 

Required COGNATES: 

SO 101 (Principles of Sociology) 

NLA. 307 I Statistical Methods D 

NLA 308 (Statistical Methods ID 



4 hours 
4 hours 
4 hours 
4 hours 
4 hours 
4 hours 
4 hours 

4 hours 

5 hours 


45 hours 
28 hours 

4 hours 
4 hours 
4 hours 



MINOR IN PSYCHOLOGY 

PSYCHOLOGY MINOR 

PY 101 (Principles of Psychology) 4 hours 

PY 201 (Psychology of Religion)' 4 hours 

PY 301 i Social Psychology) 4 hours 

PY 401 (History and Systems of Psychology) 4 hours 

16 hours 

Electives (12 hours from any of the 3 areas: 

Psychology. Sociology and Social Wok) 12 hours 

( 12 hours of upper division courses are required^ 28 hours 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

PY 101. PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGY 4 

An experimentally oriented introduction to the science of psychology, including 
such concepts as emotion, motivation, adjustment, perception, learning, intelli- 
gence, measurement, and experimental methods. 

PY 1 1 1 . SCHOLARSHIP SKILLS 2 

The application of psychology to the development of effective college study skills. 
Students* individual abilities are assessed so that group and individual programs 
may be designed to eliminate students' specific weaknesses and to improve their 
general higher level work skills. Elective credit only. 

PY 201 . PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION 4 

A study of Christian principles of Psychology based on the writings of Ellen G. 
White. Prerequisite: PY 101. 

PY 221. PERSONAL AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT 4 

A study and development of methods of effective adjustment to stresses resulting 
from social interaction, occupational choice, education and life goals, and marital 
relationships. Prerequisite: PY 101. 

PY 301 . SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 

The study of group affiliations, group standards, social perceptions and other 
social factors influencing the behavior of individuals, and interacting among 
groups. Prerequisite: PY 101 and SO 101. 



Behavioral Sciences 85 






PY 319. THEORIES OF PERSONALITY 4 

A study of the main theories of personality structure, with consideration of the 
essential ingredients of healthy attitudes and behavior patterns. Prerequisite: PY 
101 or permission of instructor. 

PY 321. ABNORMAL BEHAVIOR 4 

A study of the types, natures and causes of abnormal behavior; the effects of 
maladaptive behavior on individuals, families and communities, and methods of 
treatment. Prerequisite: PY 101 or permission of instructor. 

PY 331. GROUP DYNAMICS 4 

A study of the dynamics of groups with special emphasis being placed on patterns 
of leadership, solidarity, cohesion, conflict, accommodation, and cooperation. 
Prerequisite: PY 101 and PY 301. 

PY 340. BEHAVIOR DISORDERS IN CHILDREN 4 

This course is designed to give the student a descriptive and theoretical survey of 
the major forms of child-psychopathology with a detailed analysis of behaviors of 
children, methods of identification, and present methods of prevention and treat- 
ment. Prerequisite: PY 101 and permission of instructor. 

PY 351 . INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 

Application of psychology to the study of industrial and personnel problems, 
including such areas as human relations, selection, training, employee motivation, 
and morale. Prerequisite: PY 101. 

PY 360. EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY I 4 

A survey course acquainting the student with the experimental analysis of be- 
havior. Emphasis will be placed on the physiological processes involved in human 
behavior. Three hours lecture, two hours laboraory each week. Prerequisites: MA 

PY 361. EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY II 4 

An advanced course utilizing laboratory facilities to investigate human and animal 
behavior. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory each week. Prerequisite: PY 
360. 

PY 367. COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY 4 

Introduces students to the models of community intervention, history of Social 
Service, strategies of community problem solving; and examples of program 
intervention. Prerequisites.: PY 101 and SO 101. To be offered even-numbered 
years. 

PY 401. HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY 4 

A study of the theoretical systems, experiments and personalities involved in the 
development of psychology. Senior standing. 

PY 41 1 . PRINCIPLES OF RESEARCH 4 

An introduction to research methods and their application to social science with 
special relationship to the behavioral sciences. Prerequisites: PY 101 and MA 307. 

PY 421. INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING AND PRACTICUM I 2,4 

This course involves a study of major counseling theories and a field placement. 
Two hours per week is spent in the classroom and four hours per week spent at the 
field placement. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor. 

PY 422. INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING AND PRACTICUM II 2,4 

This course continues the study of counseling theories and the field placement 
The course also acquaints the student with the practical applications of counseling 



86 



Oakwood College 



techniques . Two hours per week is spent in the classroom and four hours per week 
spent at the field placement. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor. 

PY 490. RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 

Senior majors in Psychology, Sociology or Social Work desirous of getting an 
independent course or research are encouraged to do so under direction of an 
advisor. Prerequisites: PY 411, MA 307 and senior standing. 



MINOR IN CORRECTIONAL SCIENCE 

CORRECTIONAL SCIENCE MINOR 

PY 101 (Principles of Psychology) 

PY 321 (Abnormal Behavior) 

SO 301 (Sociology of Deviant Behavior) 

SO 398 (Probation and Parole) 

Electives (Any three of PY 221, PY 421. PY 422 or SO 231 



4 hours 
4 hours 
4 hours 
4 hours 

16 hours 
12 hours 

28 hours 



MINOR IN GERONTOLOGY 

GERONTOLOGY MINOR 

SW 210 (Gerontology: Introduction to Aging) 

GR 390/BI 390 (Physiology of Aging / Biology) 

GR 380/HE 380 (Family & Kinship Relations of the 

Aged / Home Economics) '. 

GR 480 (Psychology of Aging) 

GR 482 (Methods, Community Service, and field Experience) 

Electives (From the following:) 

GR 385/EN 385 (The Literary Expression of Aging / English) 

SW 415 (Gerontology: Retirement/ Death & Dying) 

GR 490 (Problem Perspectives of Aging) 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

GR 380/HE 380. FAMILY AND KINSHIP RELATIONS OF THE AGED 4 

This course focuses in depth upon the family and kinship relations during old age. 
The topics of concern include the older couple, changes such as divorce and 
widowhood, sexuality, relations between adult children and aged parents, sibling 
relations during late life, great-grandparents, and other kinship relations of older 
people. 

GR 385/EN 385. THE LITERARY EXPRESSION OF AGING 4 

Traditional literary depiction of old age has tended to influence our emotional 
attitude toward this part of the human life cycle. Additionally, contemporary was 
media have customarily depicted the old as either pathetic victims or comic 
fumblers. Study of both traditional and contemporary portraits of the old may 
serve to counteract both stereotyped and sentimental responses. Studying literary 
works against the background of present-day gerontology insights will demon- 
strate the way humanities and social sciences can benefit each other. 

GR 390/BI 390. PHYSIOLOGY OF AGING 4 

The study of physiologic changes that occur during the human life span starting 
with fertilization through adulthood and from childhood to senescence. Emphasis 
will be placed on genetic, physiologic and environmental factors on the aging 
process. Aspects of aging as it relates to cell biology, nucleic acid, protein syn- 



4 hours 




4 hours 


, 


4 hours 




4 hours 


i 


4 hours 




8 hours 




4 hours 


— 


4 hours 




4 hours 




28 hours 





Behavioral Sciences 87 

thesis, hormones, the nervous system, the vascular system, internal organs 
nutrition and drugs will also be emphasized. Prerequisite: BI 101. 

GR 480. PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING 4 

Successful aging may be viewed from a variety of perspectives, including a 
statistical— norm what most people do or an ideal that few reach. The focus of this 
course is upon the psychological dimensions involving many levels of analysis- 
intellectual functioning, psycho- motor ability, changes in self-esteem and person- 
ality, and psycho-pathology. Prerequisite: PY 101. 

GR 482. METHODS, COMMUNITY SERVICE AND FIELD EXPERIENCE 4 

This course focuses on ( 1) values , knowledge and principles involved in the field of 
gerontology; (2) implications of current knowledge about aging (theory, research 
observations) for community services; (3) scope of services (information, counsel- 
ing, referral, visitation, home-housing, income maintenance, dietary care, trans- 
portation, legal aid, retirement preparation, recreation, education, etc.); (4) expo- 
sure of the students to senior centers, senior housing projects, social agencies or 
research projects. Prerequisite: SW 210. 

GR 490. PROBLEM PERSPECTIVES OF AGING 4 

The primary purpose of this course is to familiarize students with some of the 
problems people experience in relation to or as a consequence of growing older 
Material deals with the major unmet needs of older people. The approach focuses 
upon the current status of older people on the issues outlined below, identifies the 
deficiencies in these areas, and examines resources available to deal with the 
specific problems faced by older people and the broad implications and conse- 
quences of various problem solving methods. Prerequisite- SW 210 



MINOR IN SOCIOLOGY 

SOCIOLOGY MINOR 

SO 101 (Principles of Sociology) 4 hnnr „ 

™ IX 1 £ ntr? , £ d u? to ? ultural Anthr °p°i°gy)' ■' • • • • : •' • •' ■' .' : .' : : 3 d 

SO 231 (Social Problems) 4 ho 

SO 361 (Marriage and the Family) 4 hours 

SO 421 (History and Theories of Sociology) 4 hours 

Electives (Sociology, Social Work and Psychology) \ 8 hours 

(12 hours of upper division courses are required) 28 hours 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
SO 101. PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 4 

An introduction to the field of sociology, to terms and concepts related to human 
behavior, and to the influences of social and cultural factors upon human behavior. 

SO 21 1 . INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 4 

^«w UCti £ n t0 the 1 stl ? dy °. f man as a total bein g' his culture and social 
orgamzation, his inter-relationships with his habitat, and his bio-physical nature. 

SO 231 . SOCIAL PROBLEMS 4 

An analysis of areas of social behavior considered to be problems in contemporary 
American society. Prerequisite: SO 101. 

SO 241 . RACE RELATIONS 4 

tltV^u ap Z T . oa ? h t0 ih f stud y of racial elements in the population of the United 
States with particular emphasis on White and Negro groups. Prerequisite: SO 101. 



88 



Oakwood College 



SO 291. INTRODUCTION TO URBAN STUDIES 4 

Rural life and the place of rural people in our national life; rural social institutions. 
Also analysis of the modern urban community and its patterns or organization. 
Emphasis will be placed on the culture of cities and problems facing the urban 
dweller. Prerequisite: SO 101. 

SO 301. THE SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANT BEHAVIOR 4 

Examination of criminality among juvenile and adult offenders. Also an analysis of 
law enforcement policies and a critical examination of legal, judicial and penologi- 
cal systems. 

SO 341 . SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION 4 

A study of the inter-relationship of society, culture and religion; and the conflicts 
and problems which emerge between religion and other social institutions. Pre- 
requisite: SO 101. To be offered odd-numbered years. 

SO 361 . MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY 4 

The ethics of family relationships, changing trends and functions of the modern 
family. An attempt is made to bring the student into contact with facts, principles, 
attitudes and problems that are likely to play a part in marriage. Prerequisite: SO 
101. 

SO 398. PROBATION AND PAROLE 4 

Role of the probation officer in the social rehabilitation of juvenile and adult 
offenders. Theory of probation and parole in relation to actual case histories. 
Techniques of counseling and guiding the adult and juvenile offender in and out of 
the correctional institution. Prerequisite: SO 301. 

SO 421. HISTORY AND THEORIES OF SOCIOLOGY 4 

A survey of the historical background of sociology and its development as a field of 
behavioral science, emphazing basic theories of sociology and their significance to 
sociological research. Prerequisite: SO 101. 




MINOR IN URBAN STUDIES 

URBAN STUDIES MINOR 

PY 367 (Community Psychology) 

SO 291 (Introduction to Urban Studies) 

SW 207 (Welfare Policies as a Social Institution) 

SW 335 (Poverty and Deprivation) 

Electives (Sociology, Social Work, and Psychology) 

(12 hours of upper division courses are required) 



4 hours 
4 hours 
4 hours 
4 hours 
12 hours 

28 hours 



BACHELOR OR ARTS IN SOCIAL WORK 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Social Work) 

SW 201 (Introduction to Social Welfare I) 4 hours 

SW 202 (Introduction to Social Welfare II) 4 hours 

SW 207 (Welfare Policies as a Social Institution) 4 hours 

SW 210 or SW 415 (Gerontology: Introduction to Aging) or 

(Retirement/Death and Dying) 4 hours 

SW 330 (Human Behavior and Social Environment) 4 hours 

SW 331 (Child Welfare) 4 hours 

SW 451 (Methods of Social Work Intervention I) 4 hours 

SW 452 (Methods of Social Work Intervention II) 4 hours 



— 



Behavioral Sciences 



89 



SW 453 (Field Work and Seminar I) 
SW 454 (Field Work and Seminar II) 



Electives (any one of SO 241, PY 491, SW 210 or SW 415) 



Required COGNATES: 

SO 231 (Social Problems) or SW 335 (Poverty & Deprivation) . . 

SO 361 (Marriage and the Family) 

MA 307 (Statistical Methods I) 

PY 319 or PY 321 (Theories of Personality or 

Abnormal Behavior) 

PY 411 (Principles of Research) 

MA 307 — Statistical Methods I and PY 41 1 — Principles of Research 
are the only required cognates for students with a double major in 
Social Work and a major in Religion or Theology. 

MINOR IN SOCIAL WORK 

SOCIAL WORK MINOR 

SW 201 (Introduction to Social Welfare I) 

SW 202 (Introduction to Social Welfare II) 

SW 207 (Welfare Policies as a Social Institution) 

SW 210 (Gerontology: Introduction to Aging) 

SW 330 (Human Behavior and Social Environment) 

SW 451 (Methods of Social Work Intervention I) 

SW 453 (Field Work and Seminar I) 



5 hours 
5 hours 

44 hours 
4 hours 

48 hours 



4 hours 
4 hours 
4 hours 

4 hours 
4 hours 

20 hours 



4 hours 
4 hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 



30 hours 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

SW 201 . INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WELFARE I 4 

A survey of social welfare programs, practices, policies and history that acquaints 
the student with the public and private services and programs designed to enhance 
the social development of our nation and to cope with the social problems of our 
society. 

SW 202. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WELFARE II 4 

A survey of the social work profession and social welfare programs are studied. 
Emphasis is given to the practice of the social work profession, its administration, 
education for the profession and future trends. 

SW 207. WELFARE POLICIES AS A SOCIAL INSTITUTION 4 

Historical development of the social welfare system within the context of the 
economic, political, and social climate of the period; implications for social wel- 
fare policy. 

SW 210. GERONTOLOGY: INTRODUCTION TO AGING 4 

This course provides a profile of aged Americans, including minorities. Their 
unique coping problems are viewed in the light of biological, psychological, and 
sociological factors. The societal and individual response to the aged is explored. 

SW 330. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT 4 

A study of the physical, psychological, social, cultural and spiritual foundations of 
personality development; their interrelationship for normal and abnormal be- 
havior of the individual from infancy through adolescence; their implications for 



90 



Oakwood College 



*v. 



the social worker and the social functioning of the individual in his physical, 
emotional and social environment. 

SW 331. CHILD WELFARE n jn mtml family 

Z^l^^r^^'^^S'^^ economically and 
socially deprived. Open to non-majors. 
qw dl5 GERONTOLOGY: RETIREMENT/DEATH AND DYING * 

family and our society. The advantages .fJg^Sifi^thedyiivprocrts. 

upperclass students with consent of the instructor. 
SW 451-452 METHODS OF SOCIAL WORK INTERVENTION I, II M 

SW A studyoTvIlues, knowledge and P^P^^^ST^'^SS* 

SW 201, 202, 207. _^ 

&S^&^~&2ttSg£. transportation. Pre- 

requisite: SW 451. 

14 5 
SW454 FIELD WORK AND SEMINAR II . ' ' 

Prerequisites: SW 451 and SW 452. 




,v 



Biology 



91 




Department of 

BIOLOGY 



Professors: Gibbons (Head), Lubega 

Associate Professor: Jones 

Assistant Professor: Paul 



BIOLOGY (Bl) 

The Department is interested with providing its students both the 
breadth of understanding and the opportunity to explore many areas in 
biology in greater depth. The required courses and cognates in the concentra- 
tion establish a core of fundamental knowledge in biological and related 
science. Students then build on this base from a variety of other courses 
(electives), laboratory, and discussions that explore areas within biology 
from the basic level to current research topics. The development of labora- 
tory and fieldwork skills is encouraged. The major in biology prepares 
students for immediate employment as well as for professional training in 
medicine and biomedical research. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BIOLOGY 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Biology) 

BI 121, 122, 123 (General Biology) 4,4,4 hours 

BI 230 (Plant Biology) 4 hours 

BI 321 (Genetics) ; 4 hours 

BI 401, 402, 403 (Biology Seminar) 1,1,1 hours 

BI 430 (Philosophy of Science) 3 hours 

BI 460 (Cellular and Molecular Biology) 4 hours 

Electives 15 hours 

(24 hours of upper division Biology courses are required) 45 hours 



92 



Oakwood College 



A student majoring in biology may choose to follow either the B.A. 
program, the B.S. program, or B.A. orB.S. program with pre-med concen- 
tration. Students pursuing the B.A. or B.S. program will choose electives in 
consultation with their major advisors. Once electives have been agreed 
upon, the student may not change except with the prior written approval of 
the advisor. To qualify for graduation all biology majors must take at least 
two research courses— BI 204, and BI 323— in addition to the required 
courses listed for the B.A. or B.S. program. 

Pre-medical students are required to follow either the B.A. or B.S. 
program. In the final quarter of the sophomore year (but no later than during 
the first quarter of the junior year), all pre-medical students must discuss 
pre-medical requirements with their advisors. In addition to the required 
courses for the B.A. or B.S. program mentioned above, the pre-med student 
must take BI 225, BI 331, BI 480. 

Junior and senior biology majors may elect to do Research and Inde- 
pendent Study (BI 490) provided their G. P. A. in the sciences is at least 3.0. 
Required COGNATES: 

*MA 111-112, 113 (Pre-calculus) 4,4,4 hours 

**MA 211 (Survey of Calculus) '4 hours 

PH 111,112,113 (General Physics) 4,4,4 hours 

CH 111,112,113 (General Chemistry) 4^4 hours 

CH 301,302,303 (Organic Chemistry) 4,4^4 hours 

48-52 hours 







Biology 93 

MINOR (Field to be chosen) 28-32 hours 

* A student having an exceptional background in pre-college math and permission 
from math department may take MA 201, 202, and a basic computer programming 



** 



A student taking MA 1 1 1 and 1 12 and maintaining an exceptional GPA with permis- 
sion of Math Department may choose to take MA 211 and a basic computer 
programming course in place of MA 113. 



MINOR IN BIOLOGY 

BIOLOGY MINOR 

m J2vJF\ 1 5 ( , Gen f ml Bi ° logy) W hours 

Ilecuvef ° 8y) 4hours 

fclectives 12 hours 

(8 hours of upper division Biology courses are required) 28 hours 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Biology) 

m ™Vw Vir ( . Gei \ eml Bi0l0gy) 4 > 4 >4 hours 

* {g? Plant Biology) 4 hours 

BI 321 (Genetics) 4 h 

BI 401, 402, 403 (Biology Seminar) i i 7 Knurs 

BI 430 (Philosophy of Science) M 'i u^ll 

BI 460 (Cellular and Molecular Biology) 4 hours 

Eiectives. ;;;;; ;; ;;;;;;; __ J ohou I s 

(32 hours of upper division Biology courses are required) 60 hours 

Required COGNATES: Same as B.A. in Biology 
Specializing procedure: Same as B.A. in Biology 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
B1 101, 102. THE LIFE SCIENCES 4>4 

This course is designed for non-science majors. It is a basic study of biological 
principles involving various plants and animals. A major objective is the presenta- 
tion ot the concept of man in his biological background. Simple laboratory experi- 
ments are designed to augment lecture material. These experiments can be used to 
teach on all grade school levels from preschool to high school. Three hours lecture 
and one two-hour lab each week. Does not apply on a major or minor. 

BM 11, 112, 113. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 4,4,4 

The study of the structure and function of the human organism, including its cells 
tissues organs and systems. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory each 
week. Does not apply on a major or a minor. 

BI 121, 122, 123. BIOLOGY 4 4 4 

A study of the fundamentals of biochemistry, physiology, genetics, zoology 
eachweek 8 ' Md eCOl ° 8y ' ThreC h ° UrS * eCtUre ' *™* hours labCra^' 



94 Oakwood College 

Bl 204. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH 2 

The course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to study various 
methods and techniques related to and/or necessary for the development of a 
research protocol and engage in limited research. Directed study. Prerequisites: 
BI 121, 122, 123, CH 111-113, MA 111-112, 113 or permission of instructor. 

Bl 221. MICROBIOLOGY 5 

The nature of bacteria and disease-producing organisms with their habits and 
methods of reproduction and the relation of these organisms to disease in the 
human body are studied. Four hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 

Bl 225. EMBRYOLOGY 4 

A study of the embryonic development of animals with emphasis on the develop- 
mental morphology of vertebrates. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory 
each week. Prerequisite: BI 121, 122, 123. 

Bl 226. NATURAL HISTORY 4 

Identification, distribution, and life habits of plants and animals of Alabama. Does 
not apply toward a major in biology. Three hours lecture per week; field trips. 

Bl 230. PLANT BIOLOGY 4 

A study of the phylogeny, structure, reproduction and photosynthesis, beginning 
with simple unicellular and proceeding through various levels of complexity to the 
flowering plant. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory each week. 

Bl 316. BIOLOGICAL INSTRUMENTATION 4 

This course is designed to introduce the student to a variety of laboratory instru- 
ments, their care and usage through specially designed experiments. Two hours 
lecture; two three-hour labs per week. Prerequisites: BI 121, 122, 123; CH 111, 112, 
113; MA 111, 112, 113 or permission of instructor. 

Bl 321. GENETICS 4 

A study of the principles of inheritance in living organisms. Three hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory each week. Prerequisites: BI 121, 122, 123; CH 301-302-303. 

Bl 323. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH 1" 4 

Directed independent research in an approved area. Prerequisites: BI 121, 122, 123, 
204; CH 111-112-113; MA 111-112-113. 

Bl 325. LIMNOLOGY 4 

Physical and biological aspects of fresh water and their human implications. Four 
hours lecture per week; field trips or labs TBA. Prerequisites: BI 121, 122, 123. 

Bl 331. HISTOLOGY 4 

A study of the microscopic anatomy of vertebrate tissues and organs including 
references to their functions. Prerequisites: BI 121, 122, 123. 

Bl 340. PROTOZOOLOGY 4 

Morphology, taxonomy and life history of free living and parasitic protozoa. Three 
hours lecture; one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisites: BI 121, 122, 123. 

Bl 360. INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 4 

A survey of invertebrate biology emphasizing physio behavioral-ecological adap- 
tations of major taxonomic groups. Field identification of local species is included. 
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. Prerequisites: BI 121-122- 
123. 

Bl 380. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY 5 

A study of the comparative anatomy of the chordates with emphasis on the 



Biology 95 

vertebrates. Detailed dissections of the shark and cat are made in the laboratory 
Three hours lecture, six hours laboratory each week. Prerequisites; BI 121-122-123. 

Bl 401, 402, 403. BIOLOGY SEMINAR 1?1>1 

Discussion and student reports of both historical developments and current re- 
search topics in biology based upon intensive study of the literature. The student is 
expected to become familiar with the significant contributions of biology and some 
of the methods used presently to expand the frontiers of biological science One 
hour per week. Senior standing, or instructor's consent. 

Bl 406. INTRODUCTION OF MARINE BIOLOGY 4 

An introduction to the Marine environment and to the marine organisms, their 
adaptations and ecological relationships and the impact of man on the marine 
environment. Three hours lecture, three hours lab or field trips each week 
Prerequisites: BI 121, 122, 123; BI 360 recommended. 

Bl 415. BIOSTATISTICS 4 

An introductory course on probability theory and statistics. Special emphasis is 
given to biological applications for sampling, tests of central tendency and disper- 
sion, and experimental design. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory each 

Bl 422, 423. GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY 33 

Function and control of all major organ systems. Emphasis would be placed on a 
comparative approach to the study of these systems. Includes topics in cellular 
pnysiology and mechanisms on both the cellular and subcellular levels with 
emphasis on biochemical and biophysical processes. Two hours of lecture and 
T^JS^PJ&SSfiS Ca ^ h ^^-Prerequisites: BI 121, 122, 123, CH 111-112- 
113; CH 301-302-303 (May be taken concurrently), and PH 111-112-113. 

Bl 424. PLANT ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 4 

A study of the anatomical nature and the physiological processes of plants during 
ontogeny, differentiation and maturation of various tissues and organs of angio- 
sperm Studies include the anatomy as it relates to water relations, mineral 
utilization, metebo ism photosynthesis, respiration, assimilation, and growth. 
Prerequisites: BI 121-122-123. 

Bl 425. GENERAL ECOLOGY 4 

A study of the basic principles of plant and animal ecology. Field trips to nearbv 
areas illustrating these principles are a part of the laboratory. Three hours lecture 
tnree hours laboratory each week. Prerequisites: BI 121, 122, 123. 

Bl 430. PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE 3 

A comparative study of the evidences for the origin and history of living things as 
™? 1%™* to the scientific and biblical records. Prerequisites: BI 101, 102, or 121 
122, 123 or permission of instructor. 

Bl 440. PARASITOLOGY 4 

A study of the parasitic forms of protozoans, helminths, and arthropods, their life 
cycles, controls, and economical, social, and health significance. Three hours 
lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 

Bl 451. SPECIAL-TOPICS IN ZOOLOGY ^5 

The exact topic hours, and prerequisites will be given by the particular instructor. 
1 nese topics include but are not limited to: Biosystematics, General Entomology, 
Anima Behavior, Histological Microtechniques, Herpetology, Special Problems 
in Zoology, Mammalogy, Symbiosis, etc. 



96 



Oakwood College 



Bl 452. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BOTANY 1-5 

The exact topic, hours, and prerequisites will be given by the particular instructor. 
These topics include but are not limited to: Systematic Botany, Population Ecol- 
ogy, Plant Morphology, Paleobiology, Plant Pathology, Special Problems in 
Botany, Plant Anatomy, etc. 

Bl 460. CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 4 

A study of cell ultrastructure, and organells as related to function. Structure and 
properties of macromolecules are also examined. Three hours lecture, three hours 
laboratory each week. Prerequisites: Bl 121, 122, 123, CH 111-112-113. 

Bl 465. ORNITHOLOGY 4 

Birds of North America: field identification, distribution, life histories, behavior, 
and ecology. Field study and lecture TBA. Prerequisites: Bl 121, 122, 123. 

Bl 480. MAMMALIAN ANATOMY 5 

A special course for the pre-med student with special emphasis on human gross 
anatomy using the monkey as a specimen for study. Three hours lecture; two 
three-hour labs per week. Prerequisites: Bl 121, 122, 123; Bl 225, Bl 380. 

Bl 484. MYCOLOGY 4 

The study of fungi, its morphology, physiology, social and economic importance. 
Three hours lecture; one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisites: Bl 121, 122, 123. 

Bl 490. RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 

Prerequisites: Bl 121, 122, 123; BI204; Bl 323; CH 111, 112, 113; MA 111, 112, 113; 
junior or senior standing; cumulative G.P.A. in Biology of at least 3.0, consent of 
the instructor and approval of the Department Research Committee. Laboratory 
or field project chosen under supervision of departmental faculty member. 
Minimum of six hours per week in the laboratory or field work, not including 
preparation or evaluation time. Research topic must be defined and approved at 
the time of registration. Course grade determined by laboratory or field perform- 
ance, written report, and oral presentation of the results to the faculty. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SCIENCE EDUCATION 

This program qualifies a person to teach secondary school biology and 
chemistry. A secondary education minor is included to provide a balance 
between professional education and subject area concentration. 

Program Advisors: E. O. Jones, Ed.S.; J. C. Hamer, Ph.D. 

Important: Consult Program Advisor or the Education Office for a 
4-year checksheet listing the specific courses required within each of the 
areas summarized below: 

Humanities 20 hours 

Social Sciences 20 hours 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 48-52 hours 

Religion 18-20 hours 

Health & P.E 4 hours 

Humanistic & Behavioral Studies 20 hours 

Teaching Areas: Biology, Chemistry 80 hours 

Other Requirements in Professional Studies 37 hours 

Other Requirements in General Studies 10 hours 

♦TOTAL 212-216 hours 



Biology 97 

This curriculum will allow students, upon graduation, to apply for 
certification in the following areas: 

Alabama Class B Secondary: Biology, Chemistry, grades 7-12 
S.D.A. Basic Teaching Certificate: Biology, Chemistry, grades 7-12 

Students desiring a career in secondary education should consult the 
Program Advisor and the Teacher Education Office no later than the first 
quarter of the sophomore year in order to plan an appropriate course-of- 
study . 

The exact course requirements may differ from student to student 
depending on the precise time student enrolls in teacher education. This 
curriculum is based on denominational, state, and institutional policies and 
is thereby subject to change. When student applies and is accepted to teacher 
education (after the sophomore year), a permanent checksheet is issued 
which should not change so long as student is continuously enrolled at 
Oakwood College. 
* Some courses may be counted twice in total hours. 



98 



Oakwood College 




p»- 



Department of Associate Professor: Gill 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ounfiKKS, 

Norman 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BA) 

The aim of this department is to provide a technical, liberal and ethical 
education which will equip young men and women with the skills and 
knowledge necessary for business and economic competence. 

The Department of Business Administration offers the B.S. and B.A. 
degrees in Business Administration, Accounting, a minor in Computer 
Science, and the A.S. Degree in Accounting. The required courses in the 
B.S. programs are those recommended by the American Association of 
Collegiate Schools of Business. This program prepares men and women for 
denominational work, industry, government, graduate work, or other areas 
of employment. 

Students who elect to earn the B.A. Degree are required to take twelve 
(12) hours either in German, French, Japanese or any other modern lan- 
guage. 

No grade below "C" may apply on a major or minor or cognate. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Business Administration) 

BA 321 and 322 or 330 4,4 hours 

BA 281-282 (Introduction to Economics) 4,4 hours 

BA 31 1 (Business Finance) 4 hours 

BA 381 or PY 351 (Principles of Business Management or 

Industrial Psychology) 4 hours 



Business Administration 99 

BA 411 (Principles of Marketing) 4 hours 

BA 491 (Business Law) 4 hours 

MA 321 (Statistics) 4 hours 

Electives (Required 8 hours upper division) 12 hours 

(24 hours of upper division Business Administration 
are required) 

48 hours 

Required COGNATES: 

BA 111 (Introduction to Computer Science — Basic) 3 hours 

BA 262 (Business Computer Programming — COBOL) 4 hours 

BE 111-112 (Elementary Typing) 2-2 hours 

BE 230 (Office Machines) 4 hours 

MA 1 1 1-1 12 (Pre-Calculus) 4-4 hours 

MA 211 (Survey of Calculus) 4 hours 

27 hours 
MINOR (Mathematics or Accounting suggested) 28-32 hours 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Accounting) 

BA 321-322-323 (Intermediate Accounting) 4-4-4 hours 

BA 341-342 (Cost Accounting) 4-4 hours 

BA 381 (Principles of Management) 4 hours 

BA 391 (Income Tax Accounting) 4 hours 

BA 421 (Advanced Accounting) 4 hours 

BA 43 1-432 (Principles of Auditing Procedures) 4-4 hours 

BA 491 (Business Law) 4 hours 

Electives (Upper division) 4 hours 

48 hours 
Required COGNATES: Same as Business Administration 
MINOR (Mathematics or Business Administration suggested) 28-32 hours 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING 

The purpose of the Associate of Science degree in Accounting is to 
provide those students, who for various reasons do not acquire a four-year 
degree, an opportunity to develop enough competence in Accounting to 
obtain gainful employment. It is especially suitable for government 
employment as well as beginning levels in denominational work and indus- 
try. 

Course Number Course Description Hours 

First Year 
RE 111 or 101* Life and Teachings of Jesus or 

Introduction to the Bible 4 

BA 121-122-123 Principles of Accounting 4-4-4 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 4-4-4 

BA 281 Introduction to Economics 4 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 4 

MA 101 or MA 111 Fundamentals of Mathematics or Pre-Calculus . 4 



_■ 



100 



Oakwood College 



hours 
hours 



PE 101-102 Physical Education 1~* 

BE 111-112 Elementary Typewriting k± 

46 

Second Year 

BA 111 Introduction to Computer Science (Basic) . 

BA 26? Business Computer Programming (COBOL) . . . 

BA 301 Business Communications 4 

BA 321-322-323 Intermediate Accounting a 

BA 38! Principles of Business Management 

BA 39i Income Tax Accounting 

g A 49i Business Law 

RE 33i The Gift of Prophecy 

BE 230 Office Machines _ 

Electives** (In Accounting) — 

* Students having two or more credits in high schoolable will I take RE 1 1 1-Life and 
Teachings of Jesus and ED 250-Philosophy of Christian Education. 

** Excluding C.P.A. Review. 

MINOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MINOR 

BA 122-123 (Principles of Accounting) 

BA 281-282 (Introduction to Economics) 4 -4 

Electives (Upper Division) -±- 

28 hours 

MINOR IN ACCOUNTING 

ACCOUNTING MINOR 

BA 321-322-323 (Intermediate Accounting) 4-4-4 pours 

BA 341-342 (Cost Accounting) +* " 

BA 391 (Income Tax Accounting) 7 . 

BA 421 (Advanced Accounting) — — - 

28 hours 

MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

COMPUTER SCIENCE MINOR 

BA 261 (Computer Programming - FORTRAN) 4 hours 

BA 262 (Business Computer Programming — COBOL) 4 nour* 

B A 270 (Information Systems/ Analysis) • ••••■•• ■ ■ ■ °°"i! 

BA 361 or BA 362 (Advanced FORTRAN or Advanced COBOL) . 4 hours 

BA 461 (Data Structures) \ n ° u " 

BA 463 (Computing Practicum) • • • • • • \ !~JJ" 

Elective* (BA 361 or BA 362 or BA 364 or BA 373) 4 hours 

28 hours 

* The programming languages not selected as the concentration may be elected here 
(BA P 361-A^anced FORTRAN or BA 362-Advanced COBOL); however, it is 
recommended that BA 364-RPG or BA 37^-ASSEMBLER be elected. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

BA 100. PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS MATHEMATICS 4 

This course is a basic math review that is designed to help students acquire 
cZipSon skiUs required in the office. Through a variety of business-onented 



I 



Business Administration 101 

exercises and realistic consumer and job applications, students explore the impor- 
tant role math plays on the job. Contents include: Mathematics of Accounting and 
Records Management, Mathematics of Financial and Office Management, 
Mathematics of Marketing and Retailing, and the Metric (SI) System. 

BA 1 10. INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 4 

Designed to introduce the various areas in the field of business. A three-fold 
purpose is served: (1) to acquaint the student with the ways in which businesses 
are owned, organized, managed and controlled (2) to provide a background in 
common business practices so that a business career may be chosen intelligently 
and (3) to serve as a prerequisite for subsequent business courses. 

BA 1 1 1 . INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE (BASIC) 3 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with basic concepts of data 
processing and computing. The student will be introduced to interactive comput- 
ing and the use of various terminals; the BASIC computing language will be used. 
(This course does not apply as credit towards the Minor in Computer Science). 

BA 121-122-123. PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING 4-4-4 

This is a basic course in bookkeeping and accounting theory. Emphasis is placed 
upon the accounting cycle for non-trading and trading businesses, partnerships, 
and corporations. 

BA 261. COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (FORTRAN) 4 

Introduction to the concept of an algorithm; basic components of algorithms and 
the algorithmic processes; representation of algorithms in the form of flow charts 
and computer languages. FORTRAN experience is gained in solving both numeri- 
cal and non-numerical problems. Prerequisites: MA 1 1 1 and BA 1 1 1 or Permission. 
Lab Fee $5.00. 

BA 262. BUSINESS COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (COBOL) 4 

Data processing as related to problems involving payroll, inventory, etc.; utilizing 
the Common Business Oriented Language (COBOL). Prerequisites: MA 101 and 
BA 111 or Permission. Lab Fee $5.00. 

BA 270. INFORMATION SYSTEMS/SYSTEMS ANALYSIS 3 

The purpose of this course is to give the student exposure to Information Systems 
theory and practice including: systems analysis; data base concepts; information 
systems development methodology; systems implementation, evaluation and jus- 
tification; and management of the information system. Prerequisite: BA 111. 

BA 281-282. INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS 4-4 

A study in fundamentals of economics with application to industrial and social life. 
Factors of production, industrial organization, value, price, wealth, taxation, and 
politics are studied. 

BA 301-302. BUSINESS ENGLISH AND COMMUNICATIONS 4-4 

A thorough coverage of the principles of grammar, punctuation, capitalization, 
spelling, usage and style as they pertain to the problems of the dictator, the 
stenographer and the typist in business. In Communications, specialized training 
in business usage and commercial correspondence is offered. This course is 
planned especially for business and secretarial students in areas of letter and 
report writing. 

BA 31 1 . BUSINESS FINANCE 4 

A preliminary course which deals with operation of private profit-seeking enter- 
prises and the financial institutions common to the economy. Topics covered 
include the promotion of enterprises, risking of capital, problems of short, inter- 
mediate and long-term financing. The role of consumer credit in the financial 



102 Oakwood College 



structure and a resume of the institutions financing the consumer are also studied. 
Prerequisites: BA 121, 122, 123. 

BA 321-322-323. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING 4-4-4 

The construction, analysis, and interpretation of financial statements, together 
with related theory and practice . Prerequisites: BA 121, 122, 123. 

BA 330. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING 4 

Managerial accounting is introduced with the emphasis on the flow of responsibil- 
ity in a corporation, cost control standard costs and cost behavioral performance 
measurement for service, product-handling and manufacturing entities planning 
alternate courses of operation, and planning the acquisition of facilities. 

BA 341-342. COST ACCOUNTING 4-4 

This course treats cost accounting as a tool of management for manufacturing 
concerns. Both theory and practice are studied for job order, process, and stan- 
dard cost systems. Prerequisites: 321-322. Offered odd-numbered years. 

BA 361. ADVANCED COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (FORTRAN) 4 

A continuation of FORTRAN I with emphasis on more advanced concepts includ- 
ing functions, subroutines and multidimensional arrays. Prerequisite: BA 261. Lab 
Fee $5.00. 

BA 362. ADVANCED COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (COBOL) 4 

Advanced applications for the business environment using the COBOL language. 
Prerequisite: BA 262. Lab Fee $5.00. 

BA 364. BUSINESS APPLICATIONS (R.P.G.) 4 

Business applications stressing flow charting, calculation, input-output media, 
table handling and file manipulation for business reporting using the Report 
Program Generator language. Prerequisite: BA 1 1 1 or BA 261 or BA 262. Lab Fee 
$5.00. 

BA 371. PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT 4 

An introduction to the concepts underlying Production and Operations Manage- 
ment. Such topics as Inventory Control, Production Control, Quality Control, 
Work Measurement, Production Methods and facilities will be covered. 

BA 373. DIGITAL COMPUTER CONTROL — (ASSEMBLER) 4 

Introduction to symbolic/basic assembler language, program linkage, input-output 
instruction and machine organization. Exposure to addressing techniques and 
digital representations of data. Prerequisite: BA 1 1 1 or BA 261 or BA 262. Lab Fee 
$5.00. 

BA 381. PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 4 

A course covering the basic principles of business management including the 
organization of business in manufacturing and in merchandising. Budgeting, set- 
ting up of standards, and efficient use of both machines and men. 

BA 390. MONEY AND BANKING 4 

Organization, operation and economic significance of the monetary and banking 
systems. Prerequisites: BA 281-282. 

BA 391. INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING 4 

Discussion, analysis, and application of current federal income tax laws to indi- 
viduals, partnerships, and corporations . Training is given in the preparation of tax 
reports. Offered even-numbered years. 



— 



Business Administration 103 

BA 41 1 . PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 4 

This course covers marketing and business management in the American 
economy; market institutions and functions; relation of marketing methods to 
other economic processes and existing economic conditions; the place and impor- 
tance of marketing in modern economic organization. 

BA 421 . ADVANCED ACCOUNTING 4 

Accounting for partnerships, special sales procedures, consolidations, and 
fiduciaries. Prerequisites: BA 321-322. Offered odd-numbered years. 

BA 431-432. PRINCIPLES OF AUDITING PROCEDURE 4 

The purpose of this course is to help the student to understand the auditing part of 
the work of the public accountant, and to help him apply the methods of proce- 
dures followed in conducting an audit for a small or medium-sized concern The 
procedures for the effective auditing of cash, receivables, inventories, other 
assets, liabilities, and proprietorship are studied with an above-average degree of 
care. The procedures to be followed in carrying out detailed audit systems are also 
considered in the course. Offered odd-numbered years. Prerequisites- BA 321-322 
BA 421. ' 

BA 441 . GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING 4 

A study of the accounting principles and practices involved in budgeting, record- 
p7er%Jsl?e° BA g 421 ^ ^ ^ governments and eleemosynary institutions. 

BA 451. CPA REVIEW 4 

Intensive practice in the application of accounting theory to problems of the 
caliber contained in CPA Examinations. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. 

BA 460. DATA STRUCTURES 4 

Basic concepts of data. Linear lists, strings, stacking, arrays, and orthogonal lists. 
Representation of trees and graphs; storage allocation and collection; searching 
and sorting techniques. Prerequisites: MA 111 and BA 361 or BA 362 or BA 373 
Lab Fee $5.00. 

BA 463. ADVANCED COMPUTING PRACTICUM 5 

This course is designed to give the student exposure to "real world" conditions 
and situations in data processing. The student is expected to identify a specific 
computing application, analyze the problem, design and implement a working 
so ution and document the entire process or work in a computer services center for 
at least 20 hours per week for one quarter. Prerequisites: BA 370 and BA 361 or BA 
362. Lab Fee $7.50. 

BA 471. BUSINESS POLICY 4 

This course will develop an understanding of policy formulation and decision- 
making as related to the current business environment. It attempts to integrate 
SlSSSi t- nd *™ ntal * (marketing finance, accounting, production, economics, 
transportation) into a balanced analysis of the whole business system and develop 
a conceptual framework which is helpful in solving business problems. Prerequi- 
sites: BA 330; BA 31 1; BA 281, 282 and BA 381. rrerequi 

BA 491. BUSINESS LAW 4 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the fundamental principles 
the laws of business so he may act intelligently and understand his rights, duties, 
and liabilities in ordinary business transactions. Contracts, negotiable instru- 
ments, sales, agency, property, corporations, landlord and tenant relationships, 
wills and legacies are covered. 

BA 490. RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY 2 

Research methods, the writing of formal paper on selected business subjects, and 
oral presentation of the paper to a group for analysis and discussion. 



104 



Oakwood College 




Department of 

BUSINESS EDUCATION AND 
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 



Associate Professor: 

Price (Head) 

Assistant Professors: 

Toombs, Tucker 

Instructor: Andrews 



The major goal of this department is twofold: to prepare well-qualified 
teachers of business education for the Seventh-day Adventist school system 
and public secondary schools; to equip young men and women with the skills 
and knowledge necessary for them to enter offices as stenographers, sec- 
retaries, and general office workers. This twofold goal is accomplished by 
requiring the satisfactory completion of curricula that incorporate a proper 
balance in the areas of business administration, secretarial skills and ad- 
ministration, general education, and ethics. 

The department offers two programs for the Bachelor of Science 
degree: A major in Business Education and a major in Office Adminis- 
tration. Two Associate of Science programs with emphasis in Office Ad- 
ministration or General Clerical are also offered. The Associate of Science 
degrees are conferred upon the students at the completion of the two-year 
general clerical or office administration curricula. A minor in Office Ad- 
ministration is also available. 

Students completing the Business Education program meet the re- 
quirements of the State of Alabama and are eligible for a Class B Secondary 
Professional Certificate. All seniors are required to take the aptitude and 
advanced sections of the Graduate Records Examination. 

All skill courses completed elsewhere must be validated by a De- 
partmental Proficiency Examination to determine if the student possesses 



Business Education / Office Administration 105 



satisfactory competence in the skill areas. Other important information 
regarding skill courses completed elsewhere and departmental policies is 
available and explained to the student upon the initial entrance into the 
Department. 

No grade below "C" may apply on a major or minor. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

This program qualifies a person to teach business-related subjects at the 
secondary level. A secondary education minor is included to provide a 
balance between professional education and subject area concentration. 

Program Advisor: Sandra Price, M.S. 

Important: Consult Program Advisor or the Education Office for a 
4-year checksheet listing the specific courses required within each of the 
areas summarized below: 

Humanities 20 hours 

Social Sciences • 20 " ours 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 20 hours 

Religion W-20 hours 

Health & P.E 4 hours 

Humanistic & Behavioral Studies 20 hours 

Teaching Area: Business Education 75 hours 

Other Requirements in Professional Studies 33 hours 

Other Requirements in General Studies 10 hours 

♦TOTAL: 198-210 hours 

This curriculum will allow students, upon graduation, to apply for 
certification in the following areas: 

Alabama Class B Certificate: Business Education, grades 7-12 
S.D.A. Basic Teaching Certificate: Business Education, grades 7-12 

Students desiring a career in business education should consult the 
Program Advisor and the Teacher Education Office no later than the first 
quarter of the sophomore year in order to plan an appropriate course-of- 

study. 

The exact course requirements may differ from student to student 
depending on the precise time a student enrolls in teacher education. This 
curriculum is based on denominational, state, and institutional policies and 
is thereby subject to change. When a student applies and is accepted to 
teacher education (after the sophomore year), a permanent checksheet is 
issued which should not change so long as a student is continuously enrolled 
at Oakwood College. 
♦Some courses may be counted twice in total hours. 

TEACHING AREA: (Business Education) 

BA 121-122-123 Principles of Accounting 12 hours 

BA 111 Introduction to Computing 3 hours 

BA 281 or 282 Principles of Economics 4 hours 

BA 302 Business Communications 4 hours 



1 06 Oakwood College 

BA 491 Business Law 4 hours 

BE 140 Records Management 3 hours 

BE 230 Machines Calculations 3 hours 

BE 300 Secretarial Procedures 4 hours 

BE 321-322-323 Advanced Typewriting and Duplicating * hours 

BE 340 Office Administration _........-.. 4 hours 

BE 201-202 Advanced Shorthand (Dictation & Transcnption) . . 8 hours 

BE 400 Office Internship J Jj ours 

ED 337, 338 Business Education Techniques I, II 8 hours 

CO 201 Fundamentals of Speech — 4 hours 

TOTAL 75 hours 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Office Administration) 

/BE 140 (Records Management) ;•;••• A A ] ] } oms 

BE 201-202-203 (Advanced Dictation and Transcnption) 4-4-4 hours 

„BE 230 (Office Machines Calculations & Equipment) 3 hours 

.BE 300 (Secretarial Procedures) \ h° urs 

BE 321-322-323 (Advanced Typewriting & Duplicating) 3-3-3 hours 

.BE 340 (Office Administration) 4 hours 

BE 400 (Office Internship) \ JJ ours 

.BE 420 (Word Processing & Machine Transcnption) 4 hours 

^Elective Business Education or Business Administration 

(Upper Division) 4 hours 

48 hours 

Required COGNATES: 

BA 111 (Introduction to Computing) 3 hours 

BA 121-122-123 (Principles of Accounting) 4-4-4 hours 

.BA 301-302 (Business English & Communications) 4-4 hours 

HE 211 (Social & Professional Ethics) 2 nours 

25 hours 

MINOR (Field to be chosen) 28 "32 hours 

MINOR IN OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

OFFICE ADMINISTRATION MINOR 

BE 140 (Records Management) 3 hours 

BE 201-202-203 (Advanced Dictation and Transcription) 4-4-4 hours 

BE 230 (Office Machines Calculations and Equipment) 3 hours 

BE 321-322-323 (Advanced Typewriting & Duplicating) 3-3-3 hours 

Electives (Upper Division) 1 to 4 hours 

28 to 31 hours 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN 
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

The Associate of Science degree in Office Administration is designed 

to prepare personnel to be qualified for executive secretarial and administra- 



Business Education / Office Administration 107 

tive assistant positions in business. The program provides a background of 
cultural and academic education with the essential business skills and 
knowledge necessary for secretarial competence and is structured to enable 
the student to continue a four-year degree program in business teacher 
education or office administration without loss of credit. Credit for the last 
48 hours of course work for the Associate of Science degree must be earned 
in residence at Oakwood College. 

Course Number Course Description Hours 

First Year 

RE 1 1 1 and ED 250* Life and Teachings of Jesus and Philosophy of 

Christian Education 6 or 8 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 12 

BE 101-102-103 Shorthand Theory 12 

BA 121-122-123 Principles of Accounting 12 

BE 140 Records Management 3 

RE 201 Fundamentals of Christian Faith 4 

PE Physical Education (any activity courses) 2 

51 or 53 

Second Year 

BE 201-202-203 Advanced Dictation and Transcription 12 

BE 230 Office Machines Calculations and Equipment . . 3 

BA 281 (or elective) Principles of Economics 4 

BA 301-302 Business English and Communications 8 

BE 300 Secretarial Procedures 4 

BE 321-322-323 Advanced Typewriting and Duplicating 9 

RE 331 The Gift of Prophecy 4 

BE 420 Word Processing and Machine Transcription . . 4 

48 
TOTAL QUARTER HOURS 99 or 101 

* Students not having two or more credits in high school Bible will take RE 101, 

Introduction to the Bible, in addition to RE 111 and ED 250. 
NOTE: No grade below "C" may apply on courses in Business Administration, 
English, and Business Education. 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN GENERAL CLERICAL 

The Associate of Science degree in General Clerical is designed to 
prepare personnel for the various and sundry clerical office positions in 
business. The program provides a background of cultural and academic 
education, as well as the essential business skills and knowledge necessary 
for clerical competence. 

Course Number Course Description Hours 

First Year 

BA 100 Principles of Business Mathematics 4 

BA 1 10 Introduction to Business 4 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 12 

RE 111 and ED 250* Life and Teachings of Jesus and Philosophy of 

Christian Education 6 or 8 

BE 111-112-113 Elementary and Intermediate Typewriting 6 

BE 121-122-123 Clerical Record Keeping 12 



108 



Oakwood College 



BE 140 Records Management 3 

PE Physical Education (any activity courses) . 2 

49 or 51 
Second Year 

™ S!' 302 Business English and Communications 8 

J~ *5JJ Fundamentals of Speech 4 

£t; JJ; Fundamentals of Christian Faith 4 

Sir" Social & Professional Ethics "*' 2 

Jp £JJ Office Machines Calculations and Equipment . . 3 

Sp,S? Secretarial Procedures ... 4 

{:£; ^ Duplicating Processes 1 

55 »n The Gift of Prophecy ...]'. 4 

Electives W ° rd Processin 8 and Machine Transcription . . 4 

12 

TOTAL QUARTER HOURS 97 or 99 

* Students not having two or more credits in high school Bible will take RF mi 
Introduction to the Bible, in addition to RE 111 and ED 250 ' 

NOTE: Fn°a^h de b . el £ w ." C " ™?y apply on courses in Business Administration 
English, and Business Education. un ' 

BUSINESS EDUCATION AND 
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

BE 101-102-103. SHORTHAND THEORY 4.4 - 

h a r nH e nL a S n H° f th , C com P let r e theor y of Gregg Shorthand; rapid reading of short- 
hand plates ; development of accurate and rapid writing of shorthand from dirt* 

quarter: 60 «pS™Sl!^ mmUm Speed re 1 uil ™ent third 

BE 111-112. ELEMENTARY TYPEWRITING 

BE 113. INTERMEDIATE TYPEWRITING 

A continuation of the course RF 111 1 1-? Q na „:„i ♦**•-. 

compiex typing problems ^^llions^Tl^Z^ln^l^^ 
Minimum speed requirement- 40 wot-H* ™»r £.;«.; * • Periods per week. 

BE 121-122-123. CLERICAL RECORD KEEPING 



Business Education / Office Administration 109 

business problems provide realism in the development of skills and knowledge that 
students can use in simple clerical jobs in which record keeping is involved. 

BE 140. RECORDS MANAGEMENT 3 

Instruction and training are given in all phases of the management of business 
records. Practical application includes the five standard methods of filing: al- 
phabetic, numeric, geographic, subject, and chronologic. The practice set method 
of instruction is used. 

BE 201-202-203. ADVANCED DICTATION AND TRANSCRIPTION 4-4-4 

Prerequisite: BE 101-102-103 or demonstrated proficiency of 60 words per minute. 
Professional competency in the ability to write and transcribe shorthand; em- 
phasis on the extensive practice in the production of mailable transcription; 
office-style dictation; proofreading; efficient handling of dictation and transcrip- 
tion materials. Minimum speed requirement at the end of the first quarter, 80 
words per minute for office administration majors, 90 words per minute for 
business education majors (5-minute writing). The second and third quarters give 
insight into the nature and significance of secretarial positions in medicine, sci- 
ence , technology , law , and international trade . Minimum speed required at the end 
of the third quarter is 100 words per minute for five minutes with at least 95 percent 
accuracy. 

BE 230. MACHINES CALCULATIONS AND EQUIPMENT 3 or 4 

A course which develops the basic skills and techniques in the operation of 
duplicating, dictating, transcribing, adding, and electronic calculating machines. 
No prerequisite for 3 hours credit which includes training on adding and electronic 
calculating machines only and is recommended for business education, office 
administration majors and minors, general clerical and 2-year A.S. degree office 
administration majors. Prerequisite for 4 hours credit: BE 111-112 or dem- 
onstrated typing speed of 30 words per minute which includes all basic skills and 
techniques and is recommended for business administration and accounting 
majors and minors. 

BE 300. SECRETARIAL PROCEDURES 4 

A terminal course dealing with professional ethics of an executive secretary. 
Consideration is given to the areas of office relations, appearance, attitudes, and 
office techniques. The student will be required to perform a variety of tasks that 
give practical application to the duties of a professional secretary. This course also 
provides background information necessary for those students taking the Certified 
Professional Secretaries Examination. 

BE 311-312-313. SHORTHAND REPORTING 4-4-4 

Rapid dictation and transcription of congressional and other technical material, 
plus sermons and lectures are included. High-speed shortcuts are mastered. 
Minimum speed requirement: 120 words per minute (5-minute timing). Prerequi- 
site: a "B" average in BE 101-102-103 and BE 201-202-203. Offered by request if 
class fills. 

BE 321-322-323. ADVANCED TYPEWRITING AND DUPLICATING 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: BE 1 1 1-1 12-1 13 (beginning typewriting) or a minimum demonstrated 
proficiency of 40 net words per minute. Further development of speed and accu- 
racy in typewriting; application of skill to letter arrangement, composition of 
letters at the typewriter; business forms; tabulated reports and manuscripts, 
duplicating fundamentals using spirit, mimeograph, and offset duplicators. 
Analysis of basic skill in typewriting is followed by individual programs of reme- 
dial practice. Required minimum speed at the end of the third quarter is 60 net 
words per minute (5-minute timing). 



Oakwood College 
110 

coordinating functions are stressed m the ^otorgamzi g, v ^^ 

tices. 

of 100 for the quarter. 
BE 411-412-413. MACHINE SHORTHAND 4 " " 



class fills. 



BE 420. WORD PROCESSING AND MACHINE TRANSCRIPTION 4 

ing speed of 40 words per minute. 

BE 490 RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY 1 " 4 

A maior research project which contributes to the knowledge base of the fields of 
__S2Si^^oSSSSfiS administration. Current problems and development 
o? prSecU Sored to the student's area of professional interest will be indepea- 
dentlv researched. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education with advisor s 
approval and f be a junior or senior in residence with at least a B average or the latter 
if an Office Administration major. 



Chemistry 



SB B8 »b n m m 



111 



H He 




Xe] 



B C N F Ne 

Illli P 1 a lit 
.mmt\nm nmti mm rtmlnm 

26 2T 25 » 30 31 32*1 33 »"j| :l 

Fe Co Ni Cu Zn Ga Ge As Se Br 

55.84? 58.8332 51.76 B3.MS 65.3S US 72,58 jKiaS W W 1 * = 
44 45 48 47 48 4S 50 "J? 1 » f 

Dn Rh Pd Aq Cd In Sn Sb Te I 

SSSSs" SSL's «"»"' 1 #iT» 



lis*** 8 *!!! 



Department of Professors: Cooper (Head), Hamer 

OHPMIQTDV Instructor: Lai Hing 

CHEMISTRY (CH) 

The curriculum is structured to give our students the rigorous training 
that will qualify them to fill positions in high schools as chemistry instruc- 
tors, and in the chemical industry as chemists; to satisfy the course require- 
ments for medicine, dentistry, nursing, home economics, etc. 

No grade below "C" may apply on a major or minor. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CHEMISTRY 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Chemistry) 

CH 111-112-113 (General Chemistry) 4-4-4 hours 

CH 201 (Qualitative Analysis) 4 hours 

CH 301-302-303 (Organic Chemistry) 4-4-4 hours 

CH 321 (Quantitative Analysis) 4 hours 

CH 322, 323 (Physical Chemistry) 4,4 hours 

Electives 5 hours 

(24 hours of upper division Chemistry courses are required) 45 hours 

Chemistry majors preparing for medicine may delete CH 323 and substitute MA 
211 for MA 201-202-203. 



J 



112 

- . Oak wood College 

Required COGNATES: 

MA 111-112 (Precalculus) ... 

££ 8t!ffi$28%SF '* '****' ' ■' : : •' ■' : •' ■' ■' •' ■' «£ SS 

7 4-4-4 hours 

32 hours 
MINOR (Field to be chosen) .... 

28-32 hours 

MINOR IN CHEMISTRY 

CHEMISTRY MINOR 

™ 111-112-113 (General Chemistry) .. AAAU 

CH 201 (Qualitative Analysis) 4 " 4 ' 4 hours 

CH 301-302-303 (Organic Chemistry) ']"//'.['.']] [ [ [ [ [ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ 4 _ 4 _ 4 JjJ™ 

28 hours 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SCIENCE EDUCATION 

.* V^ J*J* ram qualifies a person to teach secondary school bioloev a nH 
chemistry. A secondary education minor is included to provide a See 
between profess.onal education and subject area concenlration 

Program Advisors: E. O. Jones, Ed.S.; J. C. Hamer, Ph.D. 

Important: Consult Program Advisor or the Eduratinn nw.^ r 

Humanities 

Social Sciences ! ! ! ! ! 20 hours 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 20 nours 

Religion 48-52 hours 

Health & P.E .'.'.'.'.'.'.' ' 18 " 20 hours 

Humanistic & Behavioral Studies 4 hours 

Teaching Areas: Biology, Chemistry £0 hours 

Other Requirements in Professional Studies ?2 £ ours 

Other Requirements in General Studies 37 nours 

♦TOTAL 10 hours 

212-216 hours 

*^2*E£Z£Szs*~- upon graduation ' t0 a ^ ** 

Alabama Class B Secondary: Biology. Chemistry, grades 7-12 
S.D.A. Baste Teachmg Certificate: Biology, Chemiftry, grades 7-12 

study. y t0 plan an a PPropnate course-of- 

depen^ng^theX^er^Tdln T? *" **- to student 

S££S*3i32ggg 



r- 



p~ 



./ ^ 



Chemistry 113 

which should not change so long as student is continuously enrolled at 
Oak wood College. 

* Some courses may be counted twice in total hours. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

CH 101-102-103. SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY 4-4.4 

A survey of inorganic, organic and biological chemistry for non-chemistry majors 
and minors. (3 lectures; 1 lab.) 

CH 105. CHEMICAL CALCULATIONS 4 

A survey of chemical calculations that is basic to an understanding of general 
chemistry. Required of students who are not prepared to enter general chemistrv 
(5 lectures) 

CH 111-112-113. GENERAL CHEMISTRY 4.4.4 

A survey of the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry with special emphasis 
on the working of problems and the relationship between atomic structure and the 
chemistry of the elements. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of "C" in high school 
chemistry or a cumulative high school GPA of 3.00 or better. (4 lectures; 1 lab.) 

CH 201 . QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 4 

A study of the principles and methods of chemical analysis used in separating and 
identifying the constituents of inorganic unknowns. Prerequisites: CH 1 1 1-1 12 (2 
lectures; 2 labs.) 

CH 301-302-303. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 4^4 

A survey of organic chemistry. It includes a general treatment of the mechanisms 
of organic reactions, resonance theory, the molecular orbital theory, the 
physiochemical basis of synthetic reactions, and an introduction to nuclear 
magnetic resonance spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy as analytical tools 
Prerequisite: CH 113. (4 lectures; 1 lab.) 

CH 31 1 . NUTRITIONAL BIOCHEMISTRY 4 

A survey of the biochemical basis of nutrition. It includes integration of 
metabolism, interpretation of metabolic basis of some nutritional diseases, energy 
balance, body fuels, nitrogen economy, minerals and vitamins, and complete diet 
tor maintaining homeostasis. This course is designed for the Home Economics and 
Nutrition curricula and will not count toward a major or minor in Chemistrv 
Prerequisite: CH 103 (4 lectures; 1 lab.) 

CH 321. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 4 

The theory and practice of inorganic analytical chemistry, utilizing gravimetric 
volumetric, and instrumental methods of analysis. Prerequisites: CH 1 13 CH 201 ' 
(2 lectures; 2 labs.) 

CH 322, 323. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 4>4 

A study of the fundamentals of chemical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics and 
guantum mechanics. Offered when required. Prerequisites: CH 113, PH 113 MA 
211 or equivalent. (4 lectures.) 

CH 401 , 402. BIOCHEMISTRY 44 

The chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, intermediary 
metabolism and certain physiological processes. Offered when required. Pre- 
requisites: CH 301-302-303. (4 lectures; 1 lab.) 



114 Oakwood College 



CH 403. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY 4 

Exact topics will be listed in the schedule. Topics may include quantum chemistry , 
instrumental analysis, qualitative organic analysis, etc. Prerequisite: CH 303, 321, 
or 323 (depending on the topic to be presented). 

CH 490. RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 

An original investigation in pure or applied chemistry under the guidance of the 
staff. Open to chemistry majors in their junior and semor years. Offered when 
required. 



( 



I 



r 



r 



Education 



115 




Department of 

EDUCATION 



Professors: Andrews, Brantley (Head), 

Hadley, Lewis 

Associate Professors: Bliss, Melancon 

Assistant Professors: Dulan, 

Montgomery-Carter, Roddy, Holman 

Instructor: Swan 



EDUCATION (ED), PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PE) AND 
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (VE) 

Teacher education at Oakwood College prepares teachers for the early 
childhood, elementary, and secondary levels. Oakwood College is an in- 
stitutional member of the American Association for Colleges of Teacher 
Education (AACTE). The teacher education program is approved by the 
Alabama State Department of Education and the Seventh- day Adventist 
General Conference Department of Education. 

Through reciprocity, graduates from approved programs may receive 
public school certification in approximately 37 states, and church school 
certification throughout North America. 

Graduates in education are employed in a wide variety of settings both 
within the denomination and in the public sector. Some graduates pursue 
advanced studies in such areas as school administration, guidance and 
counseling, special education,' school psychology, early childhood educa- 
tion, and other areas. 



, , , O akwood College 

1 lo _____ 



PROGRAMS IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

This cooperative program with home economics prepares persons to 
teach in and to develop programs in early childhood education. The cur- 
riculum allows students to apply for Alabama Certification, Nursery to grade 
three; and S.D.A. Basic Teaching Certification, grades K through elemen- 
tary grades. 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

The elementary education curriculum prepares persons for elementary 
school teaching and, eventually for graduate study and employment in 
administration, teaching, supervision, and support services The curriculum 
allows students to apply for Alabama Certification, grades 1-6; and b.D.A. 
Basic Teaching Certification, grades 1-8. 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELEMENTARY AND 
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

This comprehensive program qualifies persons to teach at both the early 
childhood and elementary levels, from nursery through grade six A per- 
sonalized program is prepared with the program coordinator of both areas 
along with the student and Department Chairman. 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION - 
WITH SPECIAL EDUCATION CONCENTRATION 

A crucial need exists for teachers in regular classrooms who are trained 
to recognize, assist, or refer students with special learning needs. Students 
are exposed to the general field of special education through coursework on 
campus as well as resources in the community and at neighboring univer- 
sities. Upon graduation, students may apply for Alabama Class B Certificate 
in elementary education , grades 1-6; may apply for a S .D. A. Basic Teaching 
Certificate; grades 1-8; and may apply directly for graduate study in special 
education for Alabama Class A Certificate. 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AREAS OF SECONDARY EDUCATION 

The College offers a Bachelor of Science degree in the following areas 
of secondary education: science education (biology and chemistry), business 
education, English education, history, social studies, home economics, 
mathematics, music education: vocal, music education: instrumental, relig- 
ion education, physical education, and physics. 

A specific checklist outlining the official graduation requirements for 
each secondary area may be obtained from the area program advisor or from 
the Education Department Office. 

A minor in secondary education consists of all the required education 
(ED) courses as specified on the official teaching area checklist. 

A comprehensive examination specified by the Department of Educa- 
tion is required of graduating seniors in certain teaching areas. 

Middle school endorsement: see Department Chairman for details. 



Education 117 



MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAMS IN EDUCATION 

A cooperative program between Andrews University and Oakwood 
College is being developed to provide summer in-service study for practic- 
ing teachers. The graduate program is offered by Andrews University on the 
Oakwood College campus. Faculty from both institutions provide the teach- 
ing staff. The curriculum is jointly planned to meet the needs of Oakwood 
College graduates as well as other interested practitioners. The NCATE- 
approved degree is conferred by Andrews University and will satisfy the 
advanced study requirements for the S.D.A. Standard and Professional 
Teaching Certificates. 

Students studying for the Master's of Arts in Teaching degree in 
Elementary Education may receive all of their instruction at the Oakwood 
College campus. Students in other Master's programs may receive up to 
one-half instruction at Oakwood and the remainder at Andrews University. 
Application procedures and policies are the same as those at the main Berrien 
Springs campus. 

For more information, contact Coordinator of Extension, Institutional 
Research Office, Oakwood College, Huntsville, Alabama 35806. 

ADMISSION TO TEACHER EDUCATION 

Entrance to college does not qualify a student for admission to teacher 
education. Eligibility for admission to teacher education is determined after 
completion of the sophomore year in college. The first two years in college 
provide the student an opportunity to qualify for entrance into a teacher 
education program. Students, in the process of considering a teaching career 
should go immediately to the Department of Education for appropriate 
information and advisement regarding their teaching areas and admission 
into teacher education. 

Criteria for admission into teacher education include the following: 

1 . An application for admission to teacher education submitted after 
completion of at least 90 quarter hours, including 72 hours of 
general requirements. 

2. A score of at least 16 on the American College Test (ACT) is 
required for students applying for Alabama certification. The test 
may be taken at any time prior to admission to teacher education but 
the score submitted shall not be more than five years old. 

3 . A minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2 . 2 on all college 
work attempted. 

4. Satisfactory performance on a written and spoken English language 
competency examination approved by the Department of Educa- 
tion, as well as demonstrated competency in the basic skills. 

5. Satisfactory assessments of one or more of the following: recom- 
mendations; interviews; tests of scholastic performance, tempera- 
ment, and articulation; along with other objective and subjective 
measures of performance. 



_^: 



118 Oak wood College 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

This cooperative program with Home Economics prepares persons to 
teach at both preschool and primary grades (nursery through grade three) . 

Program Advisor: A. Melancon, M.Ed. 

Important: Consult Program Advisor or the Education Office for a 
4-year checksheet listing the specific courses required within each of the 
areas summarized below: 

Humanities 20 hours 

Social Sciences 20 hours 



br 



The Teacher Education Council reserves the right to admit persons to 
teacher education who, in the judgment of the council, are most likely to 
profit from the teacher education program-of- study offered at Oakwood 
College. 

If necessary, a student may repeat required examinations in an effort to 
meet admission standards. Only a limited number of introductory courses in 
education may be earned prior to admission to the Teacher Education 
Program. 

No grade below "C" may apply toward a major or minor field of 
specialization. 

Application to Student Teaching Internship: In their junior year, educa- 
tion students must apply to the Teacher Education Council for admission to 
student teaching for the ensuing senior year. In addition to letters of recom- 
mendation, students are required to have GPA minimums of 2.5 major, 2.0 

minor, and 2.25 overall. Students should plan to take student teaching 

during fall and winter quarters only. All methods courses will be taken 

before student teaching. Although enrollment in other class work along with 

student teaching is discouraged, permission may be granted under the . — - 

following conditions: 1) a minimum GPA of 3.0 to take one additional j 

course and a GPA of 3.5 to take two additional courses, 2) the additional 

coursework should in no way interfere with the student teaching experience. 

Waiver: Requirements for teacher certification are based on denomina- 
tion, state and institutional policies and are thereby subject to change without 
notice. 

A compendium of program changes made since this printing are on file 
at the Education Department Office, Moran Hall, Room 106, and are 
available upon request. 

Other Requirements: Detailed information on teacher preparation and 
certification is outlined in the Teacher Education Manual. 

A copy of the Manual may be secured from the Education Office, 
Moran Hall, Room 106,; or by writing to the Department of Education, 
Oakwood College, Huntsville, Alabama 35806. 



:'— " 



it" 



— 



Education 119 



Natural Sciences and Mathematics 20 hours 

? T eIi P™> • • • • '.'. 18-20 hours 

Health & P.E 4 hours 

Humanistic & Behavioral Studies 20 hours 

Curriculum, Teaching, Instruction, and Media 55 hours 

Other Requirements in Professional Studies 29 hours 

Other Requirements in General Studies 10-12 hours 

♦TOTAL 192-204 hours 

This curriculum helps prepare students, upon graduation, to apply for 
certification in the following areas: 

Alabama Class B Early Childhood, grades nursery through 3 
S.D.A. Basic Teaching Certificate, grades K; 1-8** 

Students desiring a career in early childhood education should consult 
the Program Advisor and the Teacher Education Office no later than the first 
quarter of the sophomore year in order to plan an appropriate course-of- 
study. 

The exact course requirements may differ from student to student 
depending on the precise time student enrolls in teacher education. This 
curriculum is based on denominational, state, and institutional policies and 
is thereby subject to change. When student applies and is accepted to teacher 
education (after the sophomore year), a permanent checksheet is issued 
which should not change so long as student is continuously enrolled at 
Oak wood College. 

* Some courses may be counted twice in total hours. 
** Replace ED 301-306 with ED 311-316 for persons desiring S.D.A. Certification 
grades 1-8 ' 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

This program prepares persons for elementary school teaching and for 
graduate studies in such areas as elementary education, special education, 
school psychology, school administration, etc. 

Program Advisor: Frances Bliss, M.S. 

Important:, Consult Subject Area Coordinator or the Education Office 
for a 4-year checksheet listing the specific courses required within each of 
the areas summarized below: 

Humanities 20 hours 

Social Sciences 20 hours 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 20 hours 

SVpp '''''■'•' 18-20 hours 

Health & P.E 4 h 

Humanistic & Behavioral Studies 20 hours 

Curriculum, Instruction, Teaching and Media " " 60 hours 

Other Requirements in Professional Studies 27 hours 

Other Requirements in General Studies .' 10-12 hours 

"TOTAL 195-197 hours 



120 Oakwood College 



This curriculum helps prepare students, upon graduation, to apply for 
certification in the following areas: 

Alabama Class B Certificate: elementary, grades 1-6 
S.D.A. Basic Teaching Certificate: elementary, grades 1-8 

Students desiring a career in elementary education should consult the 
Area Coordinator and the Teacher Education Office no later than the first 
quarter of the sophomore year in order to plan an appropriate course-of- 
study. 

The exact course requirements may differ from student to student 
depending on the precise time student enrolls in teacher education. This 
curriculum is based on denominational, state, and institutional policies and 
is thereby subject to change. When student applies and is accepted to teacher 
education (after the sophomore year), a permanent checksheet is issued 
which should not change so long as student is continuously enrolled at 
Oakwood College. 
* Some courses may be counted twice in total hours. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

with a Concentration in Special Education 

This curriculum prepares persons for elementary school teaching and 
for graduate study in special education. In addition prospective teachers are 
exposed to strategies for educating the exceptional child within the regular 
school environment. 

Program Advisor: Frances Bliss, M.S. 

Important: Consult Program Advisor or the Education Office for a 
4-year checksheet listing the specific courses required within each of the 
areas summarized below: 

Humanities 20 hours 

Social Sciences 20 hours 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 20 hours 

Religion 18-20 hours 

Health & P.E 4 hours 

Humanistic & Behavioral Studies 20 hours 

Curriculum, Instruction, Teaching and Media 60 hours 

Other Requirements in Professional Studies 31 hours 

Other Requirements in General Studies 10-12 hours 

*TOTAL 199-201 hours 

This curriculum helps prepare students, upon graduation, to apply for 
certification in the following areas: 

Alabama Class B Certificate: elementary, grades 1-6 
S.D.A. Basic Teaching Certificate: elementary, grades 1-8 



Education 121 



Students desiring a career in elementary education should consult the 
Program Advisor and the Teacher Education Office no later than the first 
quarter of the sophomore year in order to plan an appropriate course- of- 

study. 

The exact course requirements may differ from student to student 
depending on the precise time student enrolls in teacher education. This 
curriculum is based on denominational, state, and institutional policies and 
is thereby subject to change. When student applies and is accepted to teacher 
education (after the sophomore year), a permanent checksheet is issued 
which should not change so long as student is continuously enrolled at 
Oakwood College. 
* Some courses may be counted twice in total hours. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELEMENTARY AND 
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

This comprehensive program prepares persons for teaching both at the 
elementary and early childhood levels. 

Program Advisors: F. Bliss, M.S.; A. Melancon, M.Ed. 

Important: Consult Subject Area Coordinator or the Education Office 
for a 4- year checksheet listing the specific courses required within each of 
the areas summarized below: 

Humanities 20 hours 

Social Sciences 20 hours 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 20 hours 

Religion 18-20 hours 

Health & P.E 4 hours 

Humanistic & Behavioral Studies 20 hours 

Curriculum, Instruction, Teaching and Media 70 hours 

Other Requirements in Professional Studies 29 hours 

Other Requirements in General Studies 10 hours 

TOTAL 207-209 hours 

This curriculum helps prepare students, upon graduation, to apply for 
certification in the following areas: 

Alabama Class B Certificate: early childhood (Nursery-grade 3); 
elementary (1-6); S.D.A. Basic Certificate: early childhood (K)** 
elementary (grades 1-8). 

Students desiring a career in elementary ECE education should consult 
the Program Advisors and the Teacher Education Office no later than the 
first quarter of the sophomore year in order to plan an appropriate course-of- 
study. 

The exact course requirements may differ from student to student 
depending on the precise time student enrolls in teacher education. This 
curriculum is based on denominational, state, and institutional policies and 
is thereby subject to change. When student applies and is accepted to teacher 



122 

___ Oakwood College 

education (after the sophomore year), a permanent checksheet is issued 
OakwoodColle ! ^^ S ° ^ " StUdCnt * continuousl y enrolled at 
** addeeTS? may be counted twice in total hours - 

BACHELORS DEGREE IN AREAS OF 
SECONDARY EDUCATION 

n, n ; Jv\ deg u ee Pr pa !* eS perS0ns for teachin S at the hi S h school and/or 
Colte e lg S m m ° re than a d ° Zen areas offered at 0akw ood 

ch . ™ e Rowing teaching areas are available for secondary education 
students: biology, chemistry, business education, music education English 
education, mathematics education, religion, physics, social studies, history 
and language arts. ™^y, 

Specific programs-of-study offered in secondary education may be 

KBEf^ under ! he T ching field descri P tions located ^^ 

in this bulletin For example, the curriculum for English teachers is found 
under the section for the English department in this bulletin. 
Secondary Education Advisor: Rosa Hadley Ed D 
"S^Sb^' SPedfiC I""*^** heated 

for cSES^KS^ - ^ upon gradua,ion > » «* 

Alabama Class B Secondary: grades 7-12 
SDA Basic Certificate: grades 7-12 

Pro gram tZ^X.Z™!? d S caa 'P education shouId con ^« *e 
rrogram Advisor and the Secondary Education Office no later than the first 

qumer of the sophomore year in order to plan an appropriate courseS 

The exact course requirements may differ from student to student 
depending on the precise time student enrolls in teacher education Tto 
curnculum ,s based on denominational, state, and institutional Tpohcies and 

ducatn SrT^T ' Whe " StUdem ap ? Iies and is 4££ 
?£Eh£ m ,he u SOphomore year), a permanent checksheet is issued 

oS S Jd Colle n g °e. Chan8e S ° ' 0ng " «*« iS COnt ™* £»«* 
* Some courses may be counted twice in total hours. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
ED 100. ORIENTATION TO TEACHING 



Education 123 



system, and the preparation and qualities essential for successful teaching in 
public and private schools. Students will perform class observations and other 
duties as teacher-aides. 

ED 152. ORIENTATION TO TEACHING II: THE BASIC SKILLS 2-6 

Examines the contemporary emphasis on "the basics" in American education. 
Opportunities will be provided for students to assess and strengthen their level of 
skills development as concomitants to the teaching process. 

ED 200. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 

A study of the nature of teaching and learning and the fundamentals involved in the 
learning processes. The course aims to aid prospective teachers in gaining a better 
understanding of children and adolescents through case studies. The course is 
designed to acquaint the students with the psychological principles involved in 
successful teaching. Prerequisite: ED 100. 

ED 210. PRINCIPLES OF EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 4 

A course designed to give the prospective teacher an understanding of the princi- 
ples and procedures employed in the organization, management, and supervision 
of an early childhood education program. Prerequisite: ED 200. 

ED 220. PRINCIPLES OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 4 

A course designed to give the prospective teacher an understanding of the princi- 
ples and procedures employed in the organization and management of an elemen- 
tary classroom. Opportunity is provided for observing, assisting, and participating 
in laboratory classroom activities. Prerequisite: ED 200. 

ED 230. PRINCIPLES OF SECONDARY EDUCATION 4 

A course designed to give students an insight into and an understanding of the 
work of the teacher. The course includes a study of the principles governing the 
objectives, organization and operation of secondary schools, as well as the prob- 
lems of guidance and classroom management. Students will be given opportunity 
to observe, to participate, and to assist in laboratory classrooms. Prerequisite: ED 
200. 

ED 250. PHILOSOPHY OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 2 

A study of the fundamental principles, theories and aims of Christian education. 

ED 254. HISTORY, PHILOSOPHY, AND FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION 2 

A study of historical and sociological foundations of education, including aspects 
of philosophical thinking, and their bearing upon education. 

ED 270. SURVEY OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 4 

An overview study of the physical, mental, and emotional development of humans 
from birth through senescence with special relevance to the nursing cycle. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. 

All courses beyond this point require application and admission into 
the Teacher Education Program. 

ED 300. CLASSROOM ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT 4 

Analysis and implementation of effective classroom organization in self-contained 
non-graded and multi-graded settings. Strategies for effective discipline, flexible 
grouping patterns and healthy classroom climate are investigated. 

ED 301-307. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING: N-3 1-3 

A series of courses in methods and materials used in teaching subject matter to 
young children with specific application for early childhood level. Emphasis is 



Oak wood College 



placed on the planning and implementation of learning activities in simulated 
and/or clinical settings. Class schedule includes two hours of lecture anTa one 
required? *" ^ childhood education. Practicum assignments are 

ED 301. METHODS IN TEACHING SCIENCE AND HEALTH: N-3 
ED 302. METHODS IN TEACHING MUSIC: N-3 
ED 303. METHODS IN TEACHING LANGUAGE ARTS: N-3 
ED 304. METHODS IN TEACHING BIBLE: N-3 
ED 305. METHODS IN TEACHING MATHEMATICS: N-3 
ED 306. METHODS IN TEACHING ART: N-3 
ED 307. METHODS IN TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES: N-3 
ED 310. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 4 

The philosophy of the selection and study of literature, emphasizing appropriate 
SEX?! f od s 'y le ,and suitability for various age groups. Extensivl reading and 
sharing of children's literature are required. 

ED 311-317. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING: N-8 4 

A series of courses in methods and materials used in teaching subject matter to 
nh»2! - chldrei l wlth a P phcation to both primary and intermediate kvds Em 

chnfcal si&E? n * '^/f^^enting unit activities in Emulated anS/or 
cluneal settings Class schedule includes two hours of lecture and two, one-hour 
teaching skills labs in elementary and early childhood education. Practicurn as- 
signments are required. ruitutuin as 

ED 311. METHODS IN TEACHING SCIENCE AND HEALTH- N-8 

ED 312. METHODS IN TEACHING MUSIC: N-8 

ED 313. METHODS IN TEACHING LANGUAGE ART: N-8 

ED 314. METHODS IN TEACHING BIBLE: N-8 

ED 315. METHODS IN TEACHING MATHEMATICS: N-8 

ED 316. METHODS IN TEACHING ART: N-8 

ED 317. METHODS IN TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES: N-8 

ED 321-327. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING 

IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 1-3 

A series of courses in methods and materials used in teaching subject matter in the 
elementary school. Application to the upper levels will be emphasized Students 

r. 1 ^t n H a H d , imple , m f nt learn u ing activities in both simu *ated and c meal seUing 
Class schedule includes two hours of lecture and a one-hour teachingskins a b fn 
elementary eduction. Practicum assignments are required. eaCmng Skllls lab ,n 

ED 321. METHODS IN TEACHING SCIENCE & HEALTH 

IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
ED 322. METHODS IN TEACHING MUSIC 

IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
ED 323. METHODS IN TEACHING LANGUAGE ARTS 

IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
ED 324. METHODS IN TEACHING BIBLE 

IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
ED 325. METHODS IN TEACHING MATHEMATICS 

IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 



M 



Education 125 

* 

ED 326. METHODS IN TEACHING ART 
IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

ED 327. METHODS OF TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES 
IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

ED 330. CLASSROOM METHODS AND TECHNIQUES 2 

Strategies for organizing and implementing classroom activities in the secondary 
school. Principles of classroom management are included along with opportunities 
for simulated and clinical practice. 

ED 331-338. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING 

IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 2-4 

A series of courses in methods and materials used in teaching subject matter to 
students in the high school and intermediate grades. Emphasis is placed on 
planning and implementing specific learning activities in simulated and clinical 
settings. 

ED 331. METHODS IN TEACHING BIBLE IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

ED 332. METHODS IN TEACHING LANGUAGE ARTS 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

ED 333. METHODS IN TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

ED 334. METHODS IN TEACHING MATHEMATICS 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

ED 335. METHODS IN TEACHING SCIENCE 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

ED 336. METHODS IN TEACHING HOME ECONOMICS 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

ED. 337, 338. BUSINESS EDUCATION TECHNIQUES I, II 

/■— ED 340. METHODS IN TEACHING READING , . 

IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL *f- 

ED 341. FOUNDATIONS OF READING 4 

A basic course stressing current theory, effective instructional procedure, learn- 
ing resources and field experiences for teachers of reading in the primary and 
intermediate grades. 

ED 342. READING DIAGNOSIS AND REMEDIATION 4 

An investigation into the etiology, diagnosis, and remediation of reading prob- 
lems. 

ED 344. READING AND EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 2 

An investigation of effective strategies for reading instruction at the early child- 
hood level. The developmental skills of the child are studied in relation to the 
cognitive and sensory motor abilities needed for reading. 

ED 350. INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION 4 

This course acquaints prospective teachers and professional workers with the 
characteristics and problems of exceptional children and youth, including: the 
mentally retarded and advanced; the emotionally maladjusted; and those having 
visual, hearing, speech or other physical handicaps. 

ED 351. TEACHING THE DISADVANTAGED CHILD 4 

A study of the special characteristics and needs of children from poverty-stricken 
communities and ways of teaching them. 



™ 



126 Oakwood College 

ED 355. HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 4 

A study of the physical, mental, emotional and social development of the indi- 
vidual from conception through senescence with particular emphasis on normal 
adaptation to change and learning processes. Observation and laboratory experi- 
ences are required, (see also HE 355). 

ED 360-363. 1-4 

A study of the principles, aims, and uses of educational media: practical applica- 
tion theory. Taught in four one-hour modules as described below. Required of 
Education majors and minors. H 

ED 360. EDUCATIONAL MEDIA: COMMUNICATIONS ■ / 

ED 361. EDUCATIONAL MEDIA: EQUIPMENT OPERATION 
ED 362. EDUCATIONAL MEDIA: DESIGN OF 

NON-PRINT MATERIALS 
ED 363. EDUCATIONAL MEDIA: MEDIA PRODUCTION 
ED 364. LIBRARIES AND MATERIALS 4 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the use and functions of a 
library and its resources. It will survey library organization services D roce«e? 

eral SM" Fundam f ntals of classification; basic reference ^mlerialsTnd gen- 
eral pnnt and non-pnnt materials will be studied. 8 

ED 370. EDUCATIONAL TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS 4 

A course designed to provide functional knowledge of the meaning use and 
operation of tests and measurements in education. The rokof Evaluation *in 
£5 s n ro n om : nstruct i on ' the development of standardized tests, teacher^made tests 
and other types of tests, as well as the grading system are studied. 

ED 381-384. FIELD PRACTICUM 1-5 

Supervised laboratory field work in a real-life educational environment The field 
experience is arranged with an education advisor to meet student's in erest and 
professional goals. A field work project proposal is required I ofall s^dents 
ED 381. FIELD PRACTICUM IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 
ED 382. FIELD PRACTICUM IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 
ED 383. FIELD PRACTICUM IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 
ED 384. FIELD PRACTICUM IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 
ED 385. SCHOOL CURRICULUM AND ADMINISTRATION 4 

A basic professional course designed to teach the essential elements in the oreani 
process C CUmCulum and the role of management in prom^tji^du^c 

ED 400. CONTEMPORARY TOPICS IN EDUCATION 4 

A study of contemporary issues within the field of education Guest lecture 
research projects, field experiences, and seminars compri e the format of ISi 
SSBSE.*-" Standin8 ' admiSSi ° n t0 S " edtatr, a an°d f £ 

ED 410-430. STUDENT TEACHING INTERNSHIP 4 . 15 

This course is offered fall, winter, and spring quarters in cooperation with selected 
area schools p e student teacher will be assigned to a coop P erat ng t^chlr at he 
beginning of the semester and will be expected to spend a minimum of ten r 10) 
weeks full-time internship in the area school. A minimum oO^Xk hours is 

hH ed K StUdent tCache / S */ e ex P ected t0 P rovid ^ their ownTansponadon to 
their teaching centers and to follow the school calendars where they a?e assigned 
College transportation is provided for a fee. The course requires weekly atfenJ 



Education 



127 



ance at the student teaching seminars. Application to student teaching should be 
made at least five (5) weeks preceding the quarter in which student teaching is 
planned. 

ED 410. INTERNSHIP: N-3 

ED 420. INTERNSHIP IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHING 

ED 430. INTERNSHIP IN SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHING 

ED 490. RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 

A major research project which contributes to the knowledge base of the field of 
education. Project is tailored to the student's area of professional interest. Pre- 
requisite: Admission to teacher education, permission of department head, 
Academic Dean, and a 3.00 GPA. 




128 Oak wood College 

HEALTH AND Assistant Professors: Montgomery-Carter, (Director) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Rodd y 

MINOR IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

MINOR in Health and Physical Education 

PE 120 (Flag Football) , hour 

PE 122 (Basketball) ??" 

PE 124 (Soccer) „/"[] £™J 

PE 126 (Softball) JJ^J 

PE 128 (Volleyball) ^ 

PE 210 (Lifesaving) \ ?™ 

PE 245 (Tennis) \ g™? 

pe 260 (Goif) ; . ; ; J {J°JJJ 

PE 301, 302, 303 (Analysis of Individual Sports) 1 i i hour 

PE 305, 306, 307 (Officiating in Team Sports) \\\ jJour 

PE 310 (First Aid Instructor and Athletic Injuries) ... '3 hours 

PE 320 (Health Education in Schools) '...." 3 JJSJ" 

PE 330 (Methods of Teaching Physical Education 

in Elementary and Secondary Schools) 3 hours 

PE 340 (Principles and Administration of Physical Education) 3 hours 

One of three (PE 250, PE 251, or PE 275) '..'.' j hour 

28 hours 

ACTIVITY COURSES 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
PE 101. PHYSICAL CONDITIONING 1 

fitness meth ° ds ' and exercises for attaining total muscular and cardiorespiratory 

PE 102. BEGINNING SWIMMING 1 

This course is designed to teach NON-swimmers the basic swimming skills and to 
overcome fear of the water. 

PE 102-A. ADVANCED BEGINNING SWIMMING j 

Designed to meet the needs of individuals who have minimal swimming ability 
and/or are uncomfortable in deep water. «uay f 

PE 207. INTERMEDIATE SWIMMING t 

Perfection of American crawl and elementary backstroke. Learn and develoo 
skills of sidestroke, breaststroke, back crawl and inverted breast stroke. Prerequi- 
site: Perform basic strokes well, tread water, and comfortable in deep water 

PE 112. ADVANCED SWIMMING 1 

Mastery of swimming strokes. Prerequisite: PE 107 

PE 120. FLAG FOOTBALL t 

An introduction to the skills and rules of flag football. 

PE 122. BASKETBALL 1 

An introduction to the skills and rules of basketball. 

PE 224. SOCCER 

An introduction to the basic skills and rules of soccer. 



Health and Physical Education 129 

PE 126. SOFTBALL 1 

An introduction to the skills and rules of softball. 

PE 128. VOLLEYBALL 1 

An introduction to the skills and rules of volleyball. 

PE 210. LIFESAVING 2 

Covers the requirements for Red Cross Advanced Lifesaving certification. Pre- 
requisite: PE 107 or equivalent performance ability. 

PE. 215. TRACK AND FIELD 1 

Rules and techniques for performing track and field activities (events). 

PE 245. TENNIS 1 

Rules and basic tennis skills. Equipment supplied but student may use own 
racquet if desired. 

PE 250, 251 . GYMNASTIC TEAM 1 ,1 

Culminates with public performance of skills on parallel bars, rings, unevens, 
balance beam, and mats. Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance of try-out re- 
quirements. 

PE 260. GOLF 1 

Introduction to golfing. Equipment supplied. 

PE 270. WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTOR 2 

Covers the requirements for Red Cross Water. Safety Instructor certification. 
Prerequisite: PE 210 

PE 275. TUMBLING AND ELEMENTARY APPARATUS 1 

Basic skills on parallel bars, rings, unevens, balance beam and mats. 

THEORY COURSES 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

PE 21 1 . HEALTH PRINCIPLES 2 

A practical study of the principles of healthful living, including a study of the basic 
physiological processes. The health instructions found in the writings of Mrs. E. 
G. White are given special emphasis. 

*PE 301 . ANALYSIS OF INDIVIDUAL SPORTS 3 

Organization, administration and teaching progression of individual sports, such 
as archery, badminton, golf, tennis, track and field, etc. Minors in Physical 
Education. 

PE 305, 306, 307. OFFICIATING IN TEAM SPORTS 1 ,1,1 

Theory and practice in officiation at team sports , interpretation of rules , officiating 
techniques, examinations and ratings. Prerequisite: Previous experience in playing 
basketball, flag football or field hockey, softball and volleyball. All students in 
these classes will be assigned to officiate for intramural programs of the College. 

*PE 310. FIRST AID INSTRUCTOR AND ATHLETIC INJURIES 3 

Covers the requirements for the standard and advanced First Aid Certificate and 
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation certificate. Includes additional material in athletic 
injuries and civil defense activities. 



130 



Oakwood College 



*PE 320. HEALTH EDUCATION IN SCHOOLS 

" PE 33a SESSMM5SS5S»5^ 

*PE 340 PRINCIPLES AND ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 

♦These courses are taught on alternate years. 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
VE 101. BRICK MASONRY 

2?teSs^ri«ss* r* estimating materiais - iab <™^ p- 4 

VE 102. MECHANICAL DRAWING 
VE 103. GENERAL HORTICULTURE 

ol SSS3SS SSSffJSttffiSr? in co r ry Uvi <*- A ^ 

field work will be coSrdinated landscape design. Lectures and 



: 







r 



r 



English 



131 




Department of 



Professors: Andrews, B. Benn (Head) 

Associate Professors: Barnes, Davis-Mouzon, Dykes 

Assistant Professors: U. Benn, Davis, Gooding 



ENGLISH, COMMUNICATIONS, 

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES, AND ART 

ART (AR), ENGLISH (EN) COMMUNICATIONS (CO), MODERN FOREIGN 
LANGUAGES (ML), AND ART (AR) 

The Department of English seeks to develop effective programs for 
training all students to read with speed and comprehension, to speak and 
write clearly, and to listen and recall correctly. It also seeks to enable 
non-majors as well as majors to perceive the importance of literature as a 
source of vital insights into the problems and achievements of men — ancient 
or modern. A major program is offered for those intending to pursue 
graduate study in English, and for those preparing to teach on the elementary 
and secondary levels. 

All entering freshmen are required to take EN 10 1- 102- 103 in sequence 
unless their high school grades, ACT and/or other test scores show evidence 
of proficiency in these areas, in which event the students may be exempted 
from EN 101 and possibly EN 102. Students are expected to complete EN 
101-102-103 by the end of the freshman year. 

Any student who receives a grade below "C" in any composition 
course will be required to repeat the course. 

A grade below "C" in any English course may not apply on a major or 
minor. 



132 Oakwood College 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

*MAJOR 

EN 21 1, 212 (Survey of English Literature) 44 hours 

EN 301 , 302 (Survey of American Literature) 44 hours 

EN 413 (Descriptive English Grammar) ... 4 hours 

EN 470 (Seminar in English) \ J™! 8 

One writing course (Eng. or Comm.) EN 304, EN 351, CO 333 . 4 hours 

One penod course: EN 323, EN 431, EN 441, EN 451, EN 461 4 hours 

One genre or author course: EN 305, EN 320, EN 421 4 hours 

' 12 hours 

45 hours 
Required COGNATES: 

Hi 3 ^ 1 or 322 (History of England I or II) 4 hours 

CO 201 (Fundamentals of Speech) .... ly^Zt 

CO 23 1 (Introduction to Journalism) . . . . .' .' .* .' .' .' .' .' .' .' .' .' .' .' .' ." .' .' .' .' .' 4 JJJJJJ 

MINOR (Field to be chosen) 28 . 32 hours 

'MINOR IN ENGLISH 



ENGLISH MINOR 

EN 211, 212 (Si 

EN 301, 302 (Survey of American Literature) 44 

EN 413 (Descriptive English Grammar) [.] 4 n 

ElectWe tm8 C ° UrSe (Eng " ° r Comm): EN 304 ' EN 351 >' CO'3'33 ' 4 hours 
4 hours 

28 hours 
SSi^SSf 8 and min ° rS mUSt take EN m as P art of *eir general education 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGLISH EDUCATION 
Concentration: Language Arts 

This curriculum qualifies persons to teach English and other communi- 
cation skills at the secondary school level; a minor is included. An alterna- 
tive curriculum is available for persons wishing to specialize only in the 
teaching of English. For details, see Dr. B. Benn. 

Important: Consult Program Advisor or the Education Office for a 
4-year checksheet listing the specific courses required within each of the 
areas summarized below: 

Humanities ~ A , 

Social Sciences g) hours 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics ..**** ™ E™~ 

Religion 20 hours 

Health &P.E, 18-20 hours 

Humanistic & Behavioral Studies ..." ™ hn"" 

Teaching Areas: Language Arts including English* '.'.'.'.'.'.'. 75 hours 

Other Requirements in Professional Studies "" 36 _io hn.,r! 

Other Requirements in General Studies '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.] 10 hours 

* TOTAL: 195-200 hours 



English 133 

This curriculum will allow students, upon graduation, to apply for 
certification in the following areas: 

Alabama Class B Certificate: Language Arts, grades 7-12 
S.D.A. Basic Teaching Certificate: Language Arts, grades 7-12 

Students desiring a career in language arts education should consult the 
Program Advisor and the Teacher Education Office no later than the first 
quarter of the sophomore year in order to plan an appropriate course-of- 
study. 

The exact course requirements may differ from student to student 
depending on the precise time student enrolls in teacher education. This 
curriculum is based on denominational, state, and institutional policies and 
is thereby subject to change. When student applies and is accepted to teacher 
education (after the sophomore year), a permanent checksheet is issued 
which should not change so long as student is continuously enrolled at 
Oakwood College. 
* Some courses may be counted twice in total hours. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

EN 100. BASIC ENGLISH 4 

A course designed for those students whose placement test scores or high school 
grades indicate that they need remedial work. 

EN 101-102-103. FRESHMAN COMPOSITION 4-4-4 

A study of rhetoric designed to teach the student effective writing, reading, 
speaking, listening. Emphasis is placed on the sentence, the paragraph, and the 
short theme with attention to language mechanics and logical structure in 101. In 
102 and 103, close study is given to expository and argumentative writing, and to 
the fundamentals of research. The requirements for EN 103 may not be met by 
special examination. 

EN 110. BASIC WRITING FOR TEACHERS 2 

This course provides students with opportunity to develop and refine their own 
writing skills. Emphasis is placed on the role of the teacher as language model in 
improving the writing skills of children. Aspects of handwriting, grammar, usage, 
spelling and sentence structure are included. 

EN 1 1 1 . DEVELOPMENTAL READING 2 

A course in college reading skills stressing proficiency and efficiency. It aims at 
strengthening reading skills while providing a stronger basis for academic success 
and attainment. This course may be repeated but without credit. 

EN 112. ADVANCED READING SKILLS 2 

This course will emphasize flexible rates of reading for various types of reading, 
stress vocabulary power through contextual, advanced structural procedures and 
semantic variations, and relate present class demands to a wider scope of or- 
ganized literature. 

EN 201 . WORLD LITERATURE 4 

A survey of selected world masterpieces of Hebrew, Greek, Roman, Asian, 
European, and African Literature in translation. Prerequisite: EN 103. 



134 

Oakwood College 



EN 210. DICTION 2 

Inl^T ° f J h i S course , is to build the student's vocabulary and give him an 
,n Fno. h dmg ° f the T et y. molo f V of familiar words, the methods of wordforSon 
SL S ,s /\ common L f ,n and Gre <* roots, and prefixes and suffixes, resulting™ 
the ability to use words precisely and effectively. tuning in 

EN 211, 212. SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE 4 4 

A study of English Literature from Anglo-Saxon to modern times Historical and 

EN 250. ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS ^K"5 

A course designed for those seniors who did not pass the English Proficiencv Test 
given in their junior year. In it the basic mechanics of sentenc T and paragranh 
structure will be reviewed until the student can demonstrate his abilitftowrfte 
acceptable standard English. Only students who have taken the Ssh ?pJ5? 

EN 301 , 302. SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 4 4 

Zteh^y^rt^™ P ° etS "' Pr ° Se WritCrS and main CUITents of thought 'to 
EN 304. ADVANCED COMPOSITION 4 

LTp^et^e: "$!$* ^ "^ ^ ° f StUdents b ^°^ ^ Ashman 
EN 305. BIBLICAL LITERATURE 

EN 311. THEORY AND PRACTICE IN LITERARY CRITICISM a 

theory fro m ancien°, 'SfSS^tiZZZSg^S^. & *»** 
EN 320. BLACK LITERATURE 

A^uTho^ 

literature produced in the UnTtec I Stafes ' maJ ° r em P hasis wi » be upon 

EN 323. MODERN AMERICAN AND BRITISH LITERATURE 4 

A study of major American and British poetry and prose writers from 1 QOO tn i Q<n 
Poetry and prose are dealt with in alternate years. Prere^es: EN iVl 1?212, 30?," 

EN 351. CREATIVE WRITING 

EN 41 1 . HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

EN 413. DESCRIPTIVE ENGLISH GRAMMAR 

p A oims o/liew Udy ° f En8Ush 8rammar from b °' h *e traditional and ,he .ingnisnc 



English 135 

EN 421. MILTON 4 

A study of Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained with some attention given to 
Milton's minor poems. Prerequisites: EN 211, 212. 

EN 431. ELIZABETHAN LITERATURE 4 

A study of major authors and works of the period. Prerequisites: EN 211, 212. 

EN 441. NEOCLASSICISM 4 

A study of the major authors and works of England from 1660 to 1798. Prerequi- 
sites: EN 211, 212 

EN 451. ROMANTICISM 4 

A specialized course in the study of English poetry and prose between 1798 and 
1832. Emphasis is placed on the classical background of Romanticism and the 
major Romantic poets. Prerequisites: EN 211, 212. 

EN461. VICTORIANISM 4 

A specialized course emphasizing major English writers from 1832-1900. Atten- 
tion is given to the milieu of the period. Prerequisites: EN 211, 212. 

EN 470. SEMINAR IN ENGLISH 1 

A seminar in which senior English majors will study current problems and de- 
velopments in the broad field of English language and literature. 

EN 490. RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 

Individual research under the guidance of an instructor. Limited to junior and 
senior majors and minors. Prior approval of the Chairman of the Department. 



COMMUNICATIONS 
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATIONS 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR 

CO 201 (Fundamentals of Speech) 4 hours 

CO 231 (Introduction to Journalism and Media Writing) 4 hours 

CO 242 (Mass Communications and Society) 4 hours 

CO 400 (Mass Communications Law) 4 hours 

CO 401 (Practicum in Communications) 4 hours 

24 hours of electives from three (3) of the following areas: 

Journalism and Print Media, Public Relations, 

Radio-TV- Film, and Speech. No fewer than 8 hours 

from any one area 24 hours 

Free electives in Communications 4 hours 

48 hours 
(24 upper division hours required) 

Required COGNATE: 

BE 111-112 (Elementary Typewriting) 2-2 hours 

MINOR (Field to be chosen) 28-32 hours 



136 

Oakwood College 

MINOR IN COMMUNICATIONS 

COMMUNICATIONS MINOR 

m 9?! , ( T Fu " d amentals of Speech) 

co ill* liTJZT^T^ & Media Writin8 > ' ■' ■' •' : : •' : ■" • ' h ,Zl 

CO 343 (Radio and TV Production) 4 hours 

Electives ' ' • 4 hours 

12 hours 

28 hours 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN COMMUNICATIONS 

Course Number Course Description 

r,. Hours 

ED 250 St ^ ear 

EN 101-102-103 Philosophy ^of Education 

MA 101 Freshman Composition 2 

PY 101 or SO 101 Fundamentals of Math. ... 12 

EN S ° 101 on^fglr ^ 8 ^ 010 ^ °r Sociology \ 

PE 211 ftSSfS* 2 ° ' 2H ' 212 ' 301 > 302 f* . i \ 

hSL ^Vtes or one Physical Activity course' i 

"r^T^r civi,iza,i ™ = 

Natural Sciences 4 

CO 201 Religion ' :•• 4 

Fundamentals of Speech 8 

4 

48 

£g J» V^anKr * Mediating' ] \ \ 

CO 401 S? dl ° and TV Production' ' .' .' 4 

Practicum in Communications ' ." ' ' ' " 4 

Social Sciences . . 4 

Religion 4 

Electives in Communications' "\\ 4 :? 

rree Electives 12 

8 

48-56 
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

JOURNALISM AND PRINT MEDIA 

CO 231 INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM & MEDIA WRITING 

The principles of news gathering internet,™ J WR,T,NG 4 

ence is gained in writing newspapeJ ^ artide" 8 ' reP ° rting are studied ' E *Peri- 
CO 332. SCRIPT WRITING 

a™ e s^ 

CO 333. FEATURE WRITING 

28SJi^^ for newspaper and magazine use' 

marketing of articles. ?SSJ35c5»7 Viewing, writing, refsio„! and' 



English 137 

co 435. editing 4 

Theory and practice of newspaper copy editing and headline writing. Emphasis is 
placed on the need to develop a broad grasp of contemporary social, political, and 
religious issues with discretion and finesse. Laboratory experience required. 
Prerequisites: CO 231, 333. 

AR 104,5. FUNDAMENTAL COMMUNICATIONS DESIGN 2 or 4 

(See Section in Bulletin on Art). 

AR 204,5. INTERMEDIATE COMMUNICATIONS DESIGN 4 

AR 254,5. FUNDAMENTALS OF ILLUSTRATION 2 or 4 

AR 304,5. ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS DESIGN 2 or 4 

AR 354,5. INTERMEDIATE ILLUSTRATION 4 

AR 454,5. ADVANCED ILLUSTRATION 4 

ED 360-3. EDUCATIONAL MEDIA 1-4 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

CO 31 1 . PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING 4 

The basics of advertising will be presented through the creation of advertising 
ideas for radio, TV and print. 

CO 331. PUBLIC RELATIONS AND PUBUC INFORMATION 4 

An in-depth analysis of various techniques of mass communication and how they 
are used to influence public opinion. Prerequisite: CO 231. 

CO 431. WRITING FOR PUBLIC RELATIONS AND PUBLIC INFORMATION 4 

Examines the style and format of public relations writing and analyzes the 
techniques of mass communications used to influence public opinion. Prerequisite- 
CO 231. 

BA 41 1 . PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 4 

(See Section in Bulletin on Business Administration.) 

RADIO - TV - FILM 

CO 241. INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION 4 

Nature, functions, responsibilities of mass media and agencies. Survey of news- 
papers, magazines, radio, television, film, advertising, public relations, press 
associations, and specialized publications. Prerequisite: CO 201 

CO 242. MASS COMMUNICATIONS AND SOCIETY 4 

Analyzes relationships between mass communication and society, including in- 
stitutional functions and socioeconomic, structural-cultural and other factors 
affecting mass communications processes. 

CO 301. INTRODUCTION TO BROADCASTING 4 

Involves a comparative study of broadcasting systems and includes some studio 
and control room experience. It also offers a general survey of the history, growth 
and development of broadcasting (including social aspects, laws and policies, 
station network organization, the advertiser, and programming). In order that a 
student might continue as a communications major, a minimum grade of "C" is 
required. Prerequisite: CO 201 



Oakwood College 



CO 330. COMMUNICATION THEORY 4 

t5£ C s <i ope * nd P ur Pose of communication, the factors involved in the process and 
the role of language in human behavior. Prerequisite: CO 201 P rocess ' aM 

CO 342. RADIO AND TV ANNOUNCING 4 

A course designed to help the student acquire the skills and sense of responsibilitv 
hat will lead to competent performance as an on-the-air announced ^ StudWs dven 
o the speech techniques that are required in preparation, announcing and narra 

5?1 or 3 P 20 ParC SCnP S and ^^Prerequisites: CO 201, 231, and either CO 

CO 343. RADIO AND TV PRODUCTION 

A study of the fundamentals of studio and control room procedure for radio and 
television. The student is expected to become conversant wkhlhe bask deration 
of audio and video equipment. This also includes planning ^ writm/ cast n? 
rehearsing, and coordinating technical aspects of productkm of aU tvL of S' 
grams. Typing is required and lab is included. PrerFqu^ CO 201 , m%ndm 

CO 345. RELIGIOUS BROADCASTING 

A study of the principles and techniques of using the radio to communicate tht 

CO 400. MASS COMMUNICATIONS LAW 
CO 401. PRACTICUM IN COMMUNICATIONS 

iasKs and routines on a daily newspaper and selected radio and TV station* 
Prerequisites: Adequate background and consent of the insfmctTs. 

AR 141,2. FUNDAMENTALS OF PHOTOGRAPHY 

(See Section of Bulletin on Art). 

AR 241,2. INTERMEDIATE PHOTOGRAPHY 
AR 341,2. ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY 

SPEECH 

CO 120. BASIC SPEECH FOR TEACHERS 

d F eTe1o^ P-ess with specific emphasis on 

ExtensL 8 opportumS to &W%Sg?£ £333"** ^^ 
CO 201. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH 

CO 211. ORAL INTERPRETATION 

page (including t he aWWfti&S SM£« ?£&£^ 



2 or 4 

2 or 4 
2 or 4 

2 



English 139 

CO 320. VOICE AND DICTION 4 

Trains for improvement in the use of the speaking voice. Attention is focused on 
range, flexibility, clarity of articulation and standards of pronunciation, with 
individual help in the correction of faulty speech habits. Prerequisite: CO 201 

CO 321. ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATE 4 

The theory and practice of argumentation with emphasis on the modes of reason- 
ing, fallacies, refutation, and rebuttal. Prerequisite: CO 201 

CO 353. FUNDAMENTALS OF PLAY DIRECTING 4 

Theories of direction and production. Producing and directing a one-act play or 
one act from a longer play for public performance. 

CO 355. CREATIVE DRAMA 4 

Philosophy and techniques involved in improvised drama, including drama for 
children. 



MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
FRENCH 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

ML 101-102-103. BEGINNING FRENCH 4-4-4 

Study of the fundamentals of grammar with elementary conversation and reading 
of simple material on French culture. Stress on accurate pronunciation. Labora- 
tory recommended. 

SPANISH 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

ML 121-122-123. BEGINNING SPANISH 4-4.4 

A study of the fundamentals of grammar with elementary conversation and read- 
ing of simple material on Spanish and Hispanic American culture. Accurate 
pronunciation is stressed. Laboratory required. 

ML 221-222. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 4-4 

A general review and continuation of grammar and vocabulary building with 
special emphasis on the spoken language. Selected readings on Spanish and 
Hispanic American life and culture. Laboratory required. Prerequisites: ML 121- 
122-123 or equivalent. 



Oakwood College 




Instructor: Elfred Lee 

ART 

The objectives of the Art Department are: to provide an environment 
conducive of spiritual, aesthetic and technical growth; to cultivate an ap- 
preciation of the many forms of visual experience; to provide opportunities 
for the joy of self-expression in the visual arts; and to prepare artists for 
emnlovment in a wide variety of professions. 

The Oakwood College Art Program presently offers a minor and a 
two-year Associate of Science Degree in Art, both of which can be applied 
toward a bachelor's degree in art which we plan to put into operation in the 

" ear Webelieve in the celebration of life, of creation, and that, as one 
closely observes and analyzes life and natural forms in creation through the 
Sline of art training, the desire to find and know the Creator will be 
realized. 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN ART 

This is a two-year program designed to help prepare students to make 
rapid application of their skills in the art profession. The program is flexible 
and so arranged that it meets the varied needs of those interested m Fine Art, 
XosSaring for a career in Commercial Art, -hetherm.Uustrat.onor 
desien Most designers are not illustrators and vice versa Therefore, Oak- 
wood College provides a program which can be tailored to meet the indi- 
vidual needs. 



Art 141 

If the student wishes to continue studying toward a bachelor's degree in 
art, he may do so without loss of credit as this two-year course applies toward 
the B.S. and B.A. degrees. 

FINE ART (STUDIO) 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

ART MAJOR 

AR 101-102-103 (Design & Composition) 2-2-2 hours 

AR 1 1 1-1 12-1 13 (Fundamentals of Drawing) 2-2-2 hours 

AR 121-122-123 (Fundamentals of Oil Painting) 2-2-2 hours 

AR 13 1-132-133 (Fundamentals of Water Color) 2-2-2 hours 

AR 141 (Fundamentals of Photography) 2 hours 

AR 217 (Art Appreciation) 4 hours 

AR 3 1 1 (Advanced Drawing) 2 hours 

AR 327 (Christian Art) 2 hours 

AR 331-332 (Advanced Water Color Painting) 2-2 hours 

AR 417 (Portfolio) 2 hours 

AR 421, 422 (Advanced Oil Painting) 2,2 hours 

AR 497 (Senior Project) 2 hours 

46 hours 

Art Electives 4 hours 

50 hours 

General Education Requirements 38-42 hours 

COMMERCIAL ART (ILLUSTRATION) 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

ART MAJOR (A.S.) 

AR 101-102-103 (Design & Composition) 2-2-2 hours 

AR 1 1 1- 1 12- 1 13 (Fundamentals of Drawing) 2-2-2 hours 

AR 121-122-123 (Fundamentals of Oil Painting) 2-2-2 hours 

AR 131-132-133 (Fundamentals of Water Color) 2-2-2 hours 

AR 141 (Fundamentals of Photography) 2 hours 

AR 217 (Art Appreciation) 4 hours 

AR 254 (Fundamentals of Illustration) 2 hours 

AR 3 1 1 (Advanced Drawing) 2 hours 

AR 327 (Christian Art) 2 hours 

AR 331-332 (Advanced Water Color Painting) 2-2 hours 

AR 354-355 (Intermediate Illustration) 2-2 hours 

AR 417 (Portfolio) 2 hours 

AR 421-422 (Advanced Oil Painting) 2-2 hours 

AR 454 (Advanced Illustration) 2 hours 

AR 497 (Senior Project) 2 hours 

54 hours 

General Education Requirements 38-42 hours 

COMMERCIAL ART (DESIGN) 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

ART MAJOR (A.S.) 

AR 101-102-103 (Design & Composition) 2-2-2 hours 

AR 104 (Fundamentals of Communications Design) 2 hours 

AR 111-112-113 (Fundamentals of Drawing) 2-2-2 hours 



142 



Oakwood College 



AR 141 (Fundamentals of Photography) 2 hours 

AR 204-205 (Intermediate Communications Design) 2-2 hours 

AR 217 (Art Appreciation) 4 hours 

AR 304 (Advanced Communications Design) 2 hours 

AR 327 (Christian Art) 2 hours 

AR 417 (Portfolio) 2 hours 

AR 427-428 (Internship in Art) 2-2 hours 

AR 497 (Senior Project) 2 hours 

36 hours 
Art Electives 14 hours 

50 hours 
General Education Requirements 38-42 hours 



MINOR IN ART 

The art minor is for those who realize the cultural advantages and the 
high degree of personal enjoyment and satisfaction found in art experience 
and training. It is designed to enhance any major with an avocation rather 
than a profession in the visual arts. No matter what the minor, a student will 
be better prepared to face and enjoy life with this experience. 

FINE ART (STUDIO) 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

ART MAJOR 

AR 101-102-103 (Design and Composition) 2-2-2 hours 

AR 111-112-113 (Fundamentals of Drawing) 2-2-2 hours 

AR 121-122-123 (Fundamentals of Oil Painting) 

or 2-2-2 hours 

AR 131-132-133 (Fundamentals of Water Color) 

AR 217 (Art Appreciation) 4 hours 

AR 3 1 1 (Advanced Drawing) 2 hours 

AR 327 (Christian Art) ? hmir« 

AR 42 1-422 (Advanced Oil Painting) ...".." .' .' .' ." .' .' .' .' .' ." .' .' .' .' ." 

or 2-2-2 hours 

AR 33 1-332 (Advanced Water Color Painting) '.. 

30 hours 



COMMERCIAL DESIGN 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

ART MINOR 

AR 101-102-103 (Design and Composition) 2-2-2 hours 

AR 104 (Fundamentals of Communications Design) 2 hours 

AR 1 1 1-112-113 (Fundamentals of Drawing) 2-2-2 hours 

AR 141 (Fundamentals of Photography) 2 hours 

AR 204-205 (Intermediate Communications Design) ....... 2-2 hours 

AR 217 (Art Appreciation) ' 4 h ours 

AR 304-305 (Advanced Communications Design) 2-2 hours 

AR 327 (Christian Art) 2 hours 

30 hours 



Art 143 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
FINE ART (STUDIO) LOWER DIVISION 

AR 101-102-103. DESIGN AND COMPOSITION 2-2-2 

A study of the basic principles and elements of representational and nonrepresen- 
tational design. Color and its effects in nature and art will also be studied. 

AR 111-112-113. FUNDAMENTALS OF DRAWING 2-2-2 

The fundamentals of drawing based on the principles and elements of design and 
spacial organization. Natural forms will be approached to develop the powers of 
observation, self-expression and technical skill in various black and white media. 

AR 121-122-123. FUNDAMENTALS OF OIL PAINTING 2-2-2 

The fundamentals of oil painting designed to help develop the proper use of 
equipment, media and color in landscape and still-life subjects. 

AR 131, 132, 133. FUNDAMENTALS OF WATER COLOR 2,2,2 

The fundamentals of painting in water based media. Creative expression will be 
emphasized in still-life and landscape subjects both in the studio and on location. 

AR 141, 142. FUNDAMENTALS OF PHOTOGRAPHY 2,2 

The fundamentals of using the camera as an instrument of creative expression 
involving the handling of equipment, producing black and white negatives, contact 
prints and enlargements. Special emphasis will be placed on photographic mate- 
rials, lighting and exposure. Students must have a 35mm camera. 

AR 241, 242. INTERMEDIATE PHOTOGRAPHY 2,2 

Further advancement and practice in the techniques and aesthetics of photog- 
raphy as a medium of personal expression with a variety of films, screens, lighting 
and filters. 

AR 251, 252, 253. FUNDAMENTALS OF CERAMICS 2,2,2 

Hand-built and wheel-formed processes. Decorative techniques, construction, 
glaze theory and proper handling are studied. 

AR 261, 262, 263. SCULPTURE 2,2,2 

The basics of three-dimensional design in wood, stone, plastic, metal, clay and 
other materials, putting into practice the fundamentals of modeling, carving, 
casting and construction. 

AR 271 . STAINED GLASS 2 

Introduction to creative design with stained glass emphasizing personal tastes and 
interpretations in this medium. 

AR 281. SILK SCREEN PRINTING 2 

Introduction to silk screen techniques as they apply to artistic creations and as a 
practical communications medium. 

AR291.PRINTMAKING 2 

Introduction to the art of etching with emphasis on studio techniques and the 
production and display of quality prints. 

FINE ART (STUDIO) UPPER DIVISION 

AR 31 1 , 31 2. ADVANCED DRAWING 2,2 

Further development of competent graphic expression by drawing from the model 
with emphasis on line, mass, gesture, and structure. Students manipulate various 
media and materials developing an individual method and style. 



144 Oakwood College 

AR 331-332. ADVANCED WATER COLOR 2-2 

Further advancement of individual skill and style through the study of form and 
color in portrait and figure painting. Experience will be gained in transparent and 
opaque techniques in various water-based paints. 

AR 341, 342. ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY 2,2 

Advanced applications in Black and White and Color photography producing 
prints, enlargements and transparencies with emphasis on personal expression 
and creative use of photography for illustration. 

AR 351 , 352. ADVANCED CERAMICS 2,2 

Chemical function of glazes and their preparation. Experimentation and formula- 
tion of clay bodies which will meet the requirements of casting, throwing and 
temperature ranges. Also a study of oxidation and reduction firing and kiln 

AR 407. INDEPENDENT STUDY 2-4 

Art practicum of advanced, directed study or studio work in a selected area of 
deficiency or interest. 

AR 41 7, 41 8. PORTFOLIO 2 2 

The development of a professional portfolio of work done as samples for prospec- 
tive employer(s). Preparation for job interviews will be emphasized and a well 
wntten resume will be produced, ready for stepping into the job market. 

AR 421, 422. ADVANCED OIL PAINTING 2,2 

Further advancement of personal style and skill through the study of form and 
color m portrait and figure oil painting. 

AR 427, 428. INTERNSHIP IN ART 2,2 

An internship program for advanced art majors, selected and supervised by the Art 
Faculty, for experience on the job with participating graphic production studios 
firms or institutions. ' 

AR 497, 498. SENIOR PROJECT 2 2 

An individual project for all majors of creative work on an advanced level The 
student will plan a public exhibit of his work. He will develop a permanent visual 
and wntten record of artistic efforts which, with selected original works, will 
become part of the Art Department collection. 

COMMERCIAL ART, LOWER DIVISION 

AR 104, 105. FUNDAMENTALS OF COMMUNICATIONS DESIGN 2,2 

The fundamentals of lettering and type styles as they relate to the production of 

^f rS 'i a i er - ,sementsand &iiphic desi 8 n - Live job assignments will provide a 
practical learning expenence. 

AR 204-205. INTERMEDIATE COMMUNICATIONS DESIGN 2-2 

? e , S i 8 « n i 0r , y iSU r c ? mmunica tions Techniques of preparing art for reproduction. 
ttulTpubUcanon appr ° ach t0 ,earning whi,e doin 8 commercial art jobs for 

AR 254, 255. FUNDAMENTALS OF ILLUSTRATION 2 2 

iu?tt^ns derin8 skiUs and techniques creating visuaiiy stimuiati " g 



' 



Art 145 

COMMERCIAL ART, UPPER DIVISION 

AR 304, 305. ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS DESIGN 2,2 

Further advancement and refinement of graphic arts techniques with emphasis on 
the proper use of the tools and machines used by the graphic artist. Field trips to art 
studios, agencies, printers and publishers will aid in the understanding of the 
artist's role in relation to the client. 

AR 354-355. INTERMEDIATE ILLUSTRATION 2-2 

Individual style and skill are further developed by concentration efforts on illus- 
trating the human figure in a variety of costumes, poses and settings for book and 
magazine assignments. 

AR 454, 455. ADVANCED ILLUSTRATION 2,2 

A variety of media will be studied as expressive forms of illustration. Camera- 
ready art will be prepared for reproduction with the use of overlays and pre- 
separated art. Field trips to art studios, agencies, printers and publishers will 
ennch the artist s experience as well as provide possible contacts for future 
employment. 

ART HISTORY, CRITICISM AND EDUCATION 

AR 107. INTRODUCTION TO VISION 2 

A general course, open to all, designed to develop visual and aesthetic 
awareness— learning to see, to notice design and order in the world about us. 
Emphasis is placed on the development of the individual's perceptual awareness 
of the elements and principles of art as they relate to nature and daily life. 

AR 21 7. ART APPRECIATION 4 

A course designed to engender an appreciation for the world's masterpieces of art. 
AR 327. CHRISTIAN ART 2 

An analysis of the key works of art and moments in history which have formed our 
present culture, with the goal of shedding light on the major characteristics of our 
age and finding solutions to present challenges the Christian faces today. 

AR 337-338-339. ART HISTORY 4^4 

A survey of art history through the ages covering Western, Eastern, African and 
American art. This course and others will be expanded and added to as the 
Department develops and adds new staff. 

AR 357, 358, 359. ART EDUCATION 2,2,2 

The study of methods for teaching art and crafts in the elementary and secondary 
schools and to give prospective teachers a practical understanding and use of 
children s art and experience. 



146 

Oakwood College 



Department of 



■ _*_.,, Professor: Barham 

MISTORY AND Associate Professors: Barnes (Head), 

POLITICAL SCIENCE Hasse Saundes 

W* «Kff SSTJ£ Politi 1 cal s , cience con * rises «» rf 

Courses neZTT* I Z 1St0ry ' P olltlcal science and geography 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

MAJOR (History) C0UR SE REQU.REMENTS 

HI 103 (World Civilization I) 

HI 104 (World Civilization II) • 4 hours 

HI 211 (U.S. History I) .... 4 hours 

HI 212 (U.S. History II) ... 4 hours 

HI 3 14 (Denominational History) 4 nours 

HI 490 (Research Seminar) 4 hours 

Electives (excluding Political Science Courses) -,? £ ours 

(25 hours of upper division History are required) 2I h ° Urs 

Required COGNATES: 45 hours 
GE 201 or 202 (Geography) . . 

Electives two Political Science Courses 4 hours 

(One must be upper division) 8 hours 

MINOR (Field to be chosen) 



28 hours 



MINOR IN HISTORY 

""KSftT °" e C ° UrSe ^ " e ° e0graPhy « **»1 ^ence. 

S?!lS ffl212 •••••'.'•'.'.'.'.■ 4 hours 

m J 14 (Denominational History) 4 hours 

Electives y [ 4 hours 

(12 hours of upper division) 16 hours 

28 hours 






History and Political Science 147 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HISTORY 
Concentration: History Teaching 

This program qualifies a person to teach secondary school history. A 
secondary education minor is included to provide a balance between profes- 
sional education and subject area concentration. 

Program Advisor: Clarence Barnes, Ed.S. 

Important: Consult Program Advisor or the Education Office for a 
4-year checksheet listing the specific courses required within each of the 
areas summarized below: 

Humanities 20 hours 

Social Sciences 20 hours 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 20 hours 

Sg h °Vp- F '.'.'"•''.' 18-20 hours 

Health & P.E 4 hours 

Humanistic & Behavioral Studies 20 hours 

Teaching Areas: History and a second approved teaching area 80 hours 

Other Requirements in Professional Studies 37 hours 

Other Requirements in General Studies 10 hours 

"TOTAL .202-216 hours 

This curriculum will allow students, upon graduation, to apply for 
certification in the following areas: 

Alabama Class B Certificate: History and Second Area, grades 7-12 
S.D.A. Basic Certificate: History and Second Area, grades 7-12 

Students desiring a career in history teaching should consult the Pro- 
gram Advisor and the Teacher Education Office no later than the first quarter 
of the sophomore year in order to plan an appropriate course-of-study. 

The exact course requirements may differ from student to student 
depending on the precise time student enrolls in teacher education. This 
curriculum is based on denominational, state, and institutional policies and 
is thereby subject to change. When student applies and is accepted to teacher 
education (after the sophomore year), a permanent checksheet is issued 
which should not change so long as student is continuously enrolled at 
Oakwood College. 

* Some courses may be counted twice in total hours. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SOCIAL SCIENCE 

This program qualifies a person to teach secondary school social studies 
including history, geography, political science, sociology, and psychology; 
a minor in secondary education is included. 

Program Advisor C. Barnes, Ed.S. 

Important: Consult Program Advisor or the Education Office for a 
4-year checksheet listing the specific courses required within each of the 
areas summarized below: 



Oakwood College 



Humanities 

Social Sciences ■ • ■ : 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics • • • ■ • ■ ■ • 

Religion ...........'••• 

l^^tciaTSnSn^ History 
She? Requirements in hfeM ^tuches . . . . . 
Other Requirements in General Studies 

♦TOTAL 



18 



.192- 



20 hours 

20 hours 

20 hours 

-20 hours 

4 hours 

20 hours 

75 hours 

37 hours 

10 hours 

196 hours 



This curriculum will allow students, upon graduation, to apply for 
certification in the following areas: 

study. v differ from student to student 

The exact course requiremente may M« torn ^ni ^ 

depending on the precise time stadent odb ; in ^£h«e 

Oakwood College. 

. Some courses may be counted twice in total hours. 



HISTORY 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
H1 103. WORLD CIV,UZ *J t 'Tves.i g ates the great movements of history from 

ISSUES £5. WSSlA* a.d. 

" ^SSSSSL* *e great movements of history from the era of 

1650 A.D. to the present time. 

4 
H1 165. THE NEGRO IN AMERICA sixteenth century to the 

A survey of the black experience in America from the sixteentn 

present. 

"' "a surveyTthTImerican scene from approximately 1607 to 1877. 

4 
HI 212. U.S. HISTORY II { h emphasis on the 

A survey of the American scene from 1877 to the present w 

contemporary period. 



History and Political Science 149 



HI 301 . ANCIENT HISTORY 4 

A survey of the ancient world from the Egyptian & Sumerians to the overthrow of 
the Roman Empire in the West. 

HI 314. DENOMINATIONAL HISTORY 4 

A survey course of the rise and progress of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. 

HI 319. LATIN AMERICA 4 

A survey of Spanish and Portuguese America from the arrival of Columbus to the 
present. Emphasis will be placed on the Caribbean connections. 

HI 321. HISTORY OF ENGLAND I 4 

A study of the development of England from the Roman conquest to 1660, with 
emphasis on the period of the Tudors and Early Stuarts. 

HI 322. HISTORY OF ENGLAND II 4 

A study of the development of England and the British Empire from the Civil War 
to the present. 

HI 325. AFRICAN CIVILIZATION 4 

A survey of African civilization from the earliest times, through the classical age of 
Greece with emphasis on Blacks during Bible times. 

HI 364. WEST AFRICAN HISTORY 4 

A study of West Africa from approximately 1000 A.D. to the present. The period 
examines the rise and decline of Ancient Ghana, Mali and Songhay. It also 
examines the Black diaspora, European penetration of West Africa and the West 
African response to colonialism. 

HI 444. HISTORY OF THE CHURCH 4 

A study of the formation and development of the Christian church until the 
thirteenth century with particular emphasis on the first four centuries. 

HI 446. THE AGE OF REFORMATION 4 

A study of the main events in European History from 1450-1650, with emphasis on 
the religious controversy. 

HI 459. RECENT AMERICAN HISTORY 4 

The study of individuals and groups in the evolving urban-industrial American 
society since 1918. (Even years) 

HI 460. AMERICA IN THE INDUSTRIAL AGE 4 

The study of individuals and groups in the emerging urban-industrial American 
society, 1877-1918. (Odd years). 

HI 468. THE AGE OF REVOLUTION 4 

A study of the main events in European History from 1789-1848, with emphasis on 
the French Revolution and Napoleon. 

HI 490. RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 

The student will be assigned to do a major research paper in either American, 
non- American, Black studies, or political science areas, and will be assigned to the 
teacher who specializes in that field. For majors only. 



150 Oakwood College 



MINOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

POLITICAL SCIENCE MINOR 

PS 120 (Introduction to Political Science) 4 h™,r« 

Electives (16 hours upper division) .-'.'.'" .".'.'.' ! 24 hours 

28 hours 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
PS 120. INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE 4 

An examination of the standard essentials of political science in which are consid- 
ered certain contemporary political doctrines, systems of government, political 
polfcies behavior ' and a l0 °k at various worldwide governmental 

PS 200. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENTS 4 

t^A^^^ Predominant ideologies and governments in the 

PS 211. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 4 

r^o^f ?£ StUdy - conc u ernin 8 the organization of the United States government in 
regard to the various branches on the Federal and State levels. 

PS 300. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT 4 

The study of the structure of state and local governments, including the historical 
development of local and regional governments in America. ni sioncai 

PS 440. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 4 

A study of international relations and diplomacy. 

PS 450. AMERICAN DIPLOMACY 

^^ c SS^SS^^.^ dw with emphasis on historicaI devel °p- 

PS 471, 472. U.S. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I, II 4 4 

A study in the growth and development of the American constitutional system 
with emphasis on the policy-making role of the supreme court. 



GEOGRAPHY 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
GE 201 . PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 4 

*^^%ffi£&&££«. U " derStand ,he *- -lationship 
GE 202. CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY 4 

An anthropological and environmental study of the interaction between the human 

cSiturl CST 1, d ^ ing - with the ori * in and «S5SSMSS23 

culture. The evolution of man's institutions from the earliest times to the oresent 

SS^ffSS^ popu,ation exp,osion > poUution ' f0 °" SSSKd 



History and Political Science 



151 



MINOR IN BLACK STUDIES 

BLACK STUDIES MINOR 

HI 165 (The Negro in America) 4 hours 

HI 325 (African Civilization) 4 hours 

EN 320 (Black Literature) 4 hours 

IN 400 (Independent Research) 4 hours 

Electives (from SO 241, HI 364, RE 2 11, and ED 351) 12 hours 

28 hours 



152 



Oakwood College 




Department of Professor: Davis (Head) 

HOME ECONOMICS Assistant Professors: Lindsay 

w Reaves, Warren 

HOME ECONOMICS (HE) 

The objectives of the Home Economics Department are to develop a 
realization of the scope of Home Economics Education: to teach standards of 
healthful living, to increase the competence of prospective teachers dieti- 
tians, home economists and to prepare students for opportunities in various 
areas of Home Economics. 

No grade below "C" may apply on a major or minor. 

All majors are required to become members of the student section of the 
American Home Economics Association. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Home Economics) 

HE 101 (Introduction to Home Economics) ...... ? hour* 

HE 111 (Food Preparation) \ F°"™ 

HE 121 (Meal Planning) ...... 7 ™ urs 

HE 131 (Nutrition) ..... j Jours 

HS Hi £ lotl ?/ n 8 Sele ction and Construction) ' '. '. '. '. [ '■ [ [ \ \ \ \ hour! 

Si 15 Textiles and Clothing Construction) \ Sours 

HE 221 (Home Management) \ g?JJ? 

SI ll 5 , S Uman x P rOWth and £ ev elopment) (See also ED 355) ' ." 4 hours 

HE 341 (Home Management Practicum) 4 L".^ 

HE 42 1 (Quantity Food Management) .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' 4 hou?s 

Electives 12 hours 

(24 hours of upper division Home Economics courses are required) 
Those planning to teach must meet state certification requirements (consult advisor). 



Home Economics 



153 



Required COGNATES: 

HE 340 (Consumer Economics) 4 hours 

CH 101-102-103 (Survey of Chemistry) 4-4-4 hours 

16 hours 

MINOR (Field to be chosen) 28-32 hours 

MINOR IN HOME ECONOMICS 

HOME ECONOMICS MINOR 

HE 1 1 1 (Food Preparation) 4 hours 

HE 121 (Meal Planning) 4 hours 

HE 151 (Clothing Selection and Construction) 4 hours 

HE 152 (Textiles and Clothing Construction) 4 hours 

Electives 12 hours 

28 hours 
(12 hours of upper division Home Economics courses are required) 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 
Concentration: Home Economics Education 

This program qualifies a person to teach secondary school home 
economics; a secondary education minor is included to provide a balance 
between professional education and subject area concentration. 

Program Advisor: R. F. Davis, Ph.D. 

Important: Consult Program Advisor or the Education Office for a 
4-year checksheet listing the specific courses required within each of the 
areas summarized below: 

Humanities 20 hours 

Social Sciences 20 hours 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 20 hours 

Religion , 18-20 hours 

Health & P.E 4 hours 

Humanistic & Behavioral Studies 20 hours 

Teaching Area: Home Economics 78 hours 

Other Requirements in Professional Studies 36-40 hours 

Other Requirements in General Studies 10 hours 

*TOTAL: 204-210 hours 

This curriculum will allow students, upon graduation, to apply for 
certification in the following areas: 

Alabama Class B Certificate: Home Economics Comprehensive, 

grades 7-12 
S.D.A. Basic Teaching Certificate: Home Economics, grades 7-12 

Students desiring a career in home economics education should consult 
the Program Advisor and the Teacher Education Office no later than the first 
quarter of the sophomore year in order to plan an appropriate course- of- 
study. 

The exact course requirements may differ from student to student 






Oakwood College 

depending on the precise time student enrolls in teacher education This 
curriculum is based on denominational, state, and institutional policies and 
is thereby subject to change. When the student applies and is accepted to 
teacher education (after the sophomore year), a permanent checksheet is 
issued which should not change so long as the student is continuously 
enrolled at Oakwood College. 
♦Some courses may be counted twice in total hours. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FOOD AND NUTRITION 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR 

HE 1 1 1 (Food Preparation) , . 

HE 121 (Meal Planning) ..... \ I? ours 

HE 131 (Nutrition) ... j £ ours 

HE 321 (Advanced Nutrition)" '.'. 7 £ ours 

HE 331 (Diet Therapy) .... J £ ours 

HE 421 (Quantity Food Management) 4 f ours 

Ekctrles^ 1 " 8 ^ 12311011 ^ Management <* Food Systems) ".'.'. '. '. 4 hour's 
20 hours 

(24 hours of upper division Home Economics courses are required.) 48 h ° UrS 
Required COGNATES: 

CH 1 1 1-112-113 (General Chemistry) 444 hnnr , 

CH 201 (Qualitative Analysis) ........ 4 " 4 1 ??"? 

CH 301-302 (Organic Chemistry) 4 1£ 

CH 321 (Quantitative Analysis) 4 1 fc* 

CH 401, 402 (Biochemistry) [ \ [ ][ [ \ ] \ \ [ [ \ \ \ [\ \ ] 4> 4 ftm 

36 hours 
MINOR (Field to be chosen) 28-32 hours 

^fisaM"^ mJ ~> ■' ■' ■' •' •' •' ••'•'•'•' : ■' l ; : : ss 

ED 200 (Educational Psychology) { £ ours 

EN 351 (Creative Writing) 4 £ ours 

MA 111-112 (Precalculus) ...'.' 4 £ ours 

PY 101 (Principles of Psychology) ' \\ 4 ~ 4 £ ours 

SO 101 (Principles of Sociology) . ...\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ ^ 

Recommended: 43 hours 

BA 1 1 1 Data Processing ^ . 

(Consult advisor for further ADA requirements) S 

MINOR IN FOOD AND NUTRITION 

HE 1 1 1 (Food Preparation) A hmm 

HE 121 (Meal Planning) . 4 ^ 

HE 131 (Nutrition) ..... 4 £ ours 

HE 321 (Advanced Nutrition)' . '. '. '. '. [ [ [ [ \ J™" 

HE 42 1 (Quantity Food Management) .....]'.[[ \ £5 

Electives « uuur* 

8 hours 

28 hours 



; 



Home Economics 155 



(12 hours of upper division Food and Nutrition courses are required) 

Required COGNATES: 

g» }«: J? 2 ; 1° 3 (Survey of Chemistry) 4-4-4 hours 

?L l lh l }i (H ^ man Anatom y and Physiology) 5.5 hours 

CH 401 (Biochemistry) 4 hours 

26 hours 

Additional courses should be chosen to meet the current requirements of the American 
Dietetic Association according to area of specilization. (Consult Advisor). 

Three routes are available to students wishing to prepare for a career in 
professional dietetics , 1) a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree 
in Home Economics — Concentration in Food and Nutrition followed by an 
internship by the American Dietetic Association, 2) an integrated four-year 
undergraduate program in which the internship is provided in the last two 
years, or 3) following the bachelor's degree a pre-planned two-year work- 
study program approved by the American Dietetic Association. It is essential 
that the student consult with an advisor in the department of home economics 
at the beginning of his/her freshman year, and preferably while in the 
secondary school. 



ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN DIETETICS 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Course Number Course Description Hours 

First Year 

J*A 121 Principles of Accounting 4 

BA 261 Computer Programming \\\' m 4 

{*A 281 Introduction to Economics 4 

BJ 1 12 Human Anatomy & Physiology \\\\\ 4 

"I 22 1 Microbiology < 

CH 101, 102, 103 Survey of Chemistry ...'.'.['.'.'.:'.[.'. !2 

CO 201 Fundamentals of Speech ' " 4 

EN 101, 102, 103 Freshman Composition .. o 

EN 201 World Literature .'.'.'/.'.'. 4 

3£ J9J Introduction to Home Economics ..'.'.'.'.'.'.'." 

££ * * l Food Preparation 4 

HE 121 Meal Preparation 4 

HE 131 Nutrition \ 

HE 331 Diet Therapy .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 4 

HE 342 Family Living 4 

HE 355 Human Development ... 4 

HE 421 Quantity Foods 4 

MA 111 Precalculus 4 

PE211 Health Principles 2 

PY 101 or SO 101 Principles of Psychology or 

__ , .« Principles of Sociology 4 

RE 101 or RE 111 Introduction to the Bible or 

DI? . Life and Teachings 4 

Kt 201 Fundamentals of Christian Faith 4 

10T 



156 



Oakwood College 



Electives 

(Four hours must be selected from the list below) 

AR 217 Art Appreciation 4 

HE 431 Organization and Management of Food Systems 4 

HI 212 U.S. History 4 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

The Associate in Science degree in Child Development is designed to 
prepare personnel to be qualified for positions in child development centers. 
The program provides a background in fundamentals necessary for working 
with preschool children. All specified courses will apply toward a 
Bachelor's degree in Home Economics. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Course Number Course Description Hours 

First Year 

ED 250 Philosophy of Christian Education 2 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 12 

MA 101 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics 4 

PE Physical Education (any course) 2 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 4 

RE 101 or 111 Introduction to the Bible or 

Life and Teachings of Jesus 4 

HE 131 Nutrition 4 

HE 231 Developing Creativity in Young Children 4 

ED 210 Principles of Early Childhood Education 4 

HE 302 Preschool Environments 4 

HE 305 Parent-Child Relationships , . 4 

One course in World Civilization 4 

52 
Second Year 

AR 217 or MU 200 Art Appreciation or Music Appreciation 4 

EN One of EN 201, 211, 212, or 301 4 

RE 201 Fundamentals of the Christian Faith 4 

HE 303 Administration & Supervision of Preschools ... 4 

HE 304 Child Development Practicum 4 

HE 342 Family Living 4 

HE 355 Human Development (See also ED 355) 4 

PY 321 Abnormal Behavior 4 

RE 331 The Gift of Prophecy 4 

SW331 Child Welfare 4 

One course in U.S. History 4 

Electives 4 

48 

MINOR IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

HE 23 1 (Developing Creativity in Young Children) 4 hours 

ED 210 (Principles of Early Childhood Education) 4 hours 

HE 304 (Child Development Practicum) 4 hours 

HE 305 (Parent-Child Relationships) 4 hours 

HE 355 (Human Development) (See also ED 355) 4 hours 

Electives 12 hours 

32 hours 



Home Economics 



157 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

HE 101. INTRODUCTION TO HOME ECONOMICS 2 

A survey of home economics as a field of study, its organizational framework, 
growth and expansion, and present status; exploration of career opportunities in 
home economics and in related disciplines that utilize home economics and skills . 

HE 1 1 1 . FOOD PREPARATION 4 

The selection, care, composition, and preparation of foods. 

HE 121 . MEAL PLANNING 4 

Menu planning, marketing, meal preparation and service. Three class hours and 
one laboratory period each week. Prerequisite: HE 111, or by approval. 

HE 131. NUTRITION 4 

Basic principles of human nutrition, including nutrients and allowances for various 
ages and normal stress conditions. Carries credit toward the general education 
requirement in science. 

HE 151. CLOTHING SELECTION AND CONSTRUCTION 4 

Artistic and economic factors are studied and applied to clothing for the family. 
Emphasis is placed on planning, buying, alteration, cost, care and renovation of 
clothing. This course offers students opportunities in construction of garments for 
the family, using patterns to develop speed and confidence. 

HE 152. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING CONSTRUCTION 4 

The impact of technology on textile fibers and fabric structure, recognition of fiber 
properties and finishing processes as they apply to construction and selection of 
clothing. 

HE 201. ART IN LIFE 4 

Designed to develop an understanding of basic guidelines for an aesthetic appreci- 
ation of art in today's world. To increase enjoyment in art and to produce freedom 
of expression. 

HE 21 1 . SOCIAL AND PROFESSIONAL ETHICS 2 

A course designed to develop an understanding of the current social code for both 
men and women and to provide experience in its application to college life, home 
and community living. Acceptable modes of interacting in social and professional 
situations are presented. 

HE 221 . HOME MANAGEMENT 4 

A study of management of time and energy, finance, food, and clothing, health and 
recreation, in homemaking and family life. 

HE 231. DEVELOPING CREATIVITY IN YOUNG CHILDREN 4 

Development of creativity and self-expression in children through stories, music, 
rhymes, play activities, and creative media. Three lectures and one three-hour lab 
per week. 

HE 301 . EXPERIMENTAL FOODS 4 

Research methods applied to individual and class problems in food preparation. 
Prerequisites: HE 111, 121, and CH 101-103. 

HE 302. PRESCHOOL ENVIRONMENTS 4 

Examination of preschool programs in alternative environments including criteria 
for physical facilities, child health and safety, personnel and licensing, manage- 
ment of finances and current legislation. 



158 Oakwood College 

HE 303. ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF PRESCHOOLS 4 

Development center: essential planning procedures including curriculum, guid- 
ance, health protection, housing, equipment, food service, budgeting, parent-staff 
relations (involvement), social services, and community relations. Prerequisites: 
HE 302 — two lectures and six hours of lab. 

HE 304. CHILD DEVELOPMENT PRACTICUM 4 

Effective methods of working with children, impact of teacher behavior on be- 
havior of children, teacher-parent and teacher-teacher relationships. Two lectures 
and six hours of observation and participation in a child development laboratory 
program. 

HE 305. PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIPS 4 

Current theories related to the effects of various parenting methods. Emphasis on 
designing a learning environment within the home for the holistic development of 
the child. 

HE 321 . ADVANCED NUTRITION 4 

A study of the principles of normal nutrition in the world field as applied to 
individuals of all ages. There are three hours in class and one in laboratory. 
Prerequisites: HE 111, 121, and 141, and Chemistry 101-102, or by approval. 

HE 331. DIET THERAPY 4 

The principles of nutrition applied to physiological conditions altered by disease 
and abnormalities. Three class periods and one laboratory each week. Prerequisite: 
HE 321. 

HE 340. CONSUMER ECONOMICS 4 

A study of supply and demand, consumer welfare, credit, protection and legal 
regulations and current issues which affect the individual's total responsibility as a 
consumer in today's changing economic environment. 

HE 341. HOME MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM 4 

Cooperative living in homemaking groups in the home management house. Ex- 
perience is given in management, accounting, food preparation and services, 
aesthetic arrangements and entertaining. Charges are based on prevailing food 
costs. Registration required in the department office one quarter in advance. 
Prerequisites: HE 111, 121, 131, 201, 221, and 340. 

HE 342. FAMILY LIVING 4 

Evaluation of membership in a social structure created to benefit each person as a 
contributor to the family and to society in their physical, mental and religious 
aspects. 

HE 351. TAILORING 4 

Principles involved in making suits and coats for men and women. Open only to 
those who show skill in the construction of garments . Prerequisites: HE 14 1 , 15 1 , or 
by approval. 

HE 355. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 4 

A study of the physical, mental, emotional and social development of the indi- 
vidual from conception through senescence with particular emphasis on normal 
adaptation to change and learning processes, observation and laboratory experi- 
ences are required. (See also ED 355). 

HE 401. DRESS DESIGN 4 

A course involving principles of draping and flat pattern design and their practical 
applications in sewing. Stress on current construction techniques and indi- 
vidualized fitting. 



Home Economics 



159 



HE 41 1 . HOUSING AND INTERIORS 4 

A study of the principles of planning housing and living environments in relation to 
needs, resources, and life styles of individuals and families at all stages of the life 
cycle. 

HE 421. QUANTITY FOOD MANAGEMENT 4 

A study of the quantity food purchasing, production, and service. Two classes per 
week and six laboratory hours in college and hospital food service by arrangement. 

HE 431 . ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF FOOD SYSTEMS 4 

A study of organization, management, personnel relationships, equipment selec- 
tion, maintenance, and layout in institutional food service. Two class hours each 
week. Laboratory experience in college and hospital food service by arrangement. 

HE 442. OCCUPATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS 4 

A course designed to provide supervised occupational work experience in com- 
mercial clothing, commercial foods, and child development. 

HE 451. HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 4 

A study of the vocational home economics program with emphasis on planning and 
implementation of curricula in middle and secondary schools. 

HE 490. RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 

Individual research. Limited to majors. Prior approval by Department Chairman. 



^■■^^-■■.■■IMMMB 



Oakwood College 
160 — — 

Professors: Blake (Head), Thompson 

Department of Associate Professor: Dobbins 

MATHEMATICS 
AND PHYSICS 

"SZZSZ St- - - — - - 

combined and unified whole. n^velon an appreciation by the 

The department further proposes to develop J» TO* e d 

r6St 'KJiSi'ftSK secondary schools mus, Jo minor in 
EducaS a^nfeet the ^— g J^ffiS-. of the 

fo noSs-s: "3ss." sfts-*- — tration - 

No gradi below "C" may apply on a major or m.nor. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MATHEMATICS 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Mathematics) Calculus) 4-4-4-4 hours 

MA 201-202-203-204 (Analytic Geometry and Calculus) • • • • 4 hours 

MA 301 (Linear Algebra) 4 hours 

MA 311 (Differential Equations) 4.4 hours 

MA 401-402 (Advanced Calculus) •••-■■•■•*. 4-4 hours 

MA 411-412 (Introduction to Modern Algebra) •••••••• ____ 

Electives (Upper Division) 45 hours 



(24 hours of upper division Mathematics courses are required) 
uired COGNATE: 
BA 261 (Computer 



Required COGNATE: 4 hours 

RA 261 (Computer Programming) 



28-32 hours 

MINOR (Field to be chosen) 

MINOR IN MATHEMATICS 

MATHEMATICS MINOR n.i«ilnO 4-4-4-4 hours 

MA 201-202-203-204 (Analytic Geometry and Calculus) •••••••; 4 4 hours 

MA 301 (Linear Algebra) . . . . • 4 hours 

MA 311 (Differential Equations) y 4 hours 

Electives (Upper Division) 28 hours 



i 



Mathematics and Physics 161 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN 
MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR 

MA 201-202-203-204 (Analytic Geometry and Calculus) 4-4-4-4 hours 

MA 301 (Linear Algebra) 4 hours 

MA 312 (Numerical Analysis) 4 hours 

MATH ELECTIVE (Upper Division) 4 hours 

B A 1 1 1 (Introduction to Computer Science [Basic]) 3 hours 

BA 261 (Computer Programming [Fortran]) 4 hours 

BA 262 (Business Computer Programming [Cobol]) 4 hours 

BA 361 (Advanced Computer Programming [Fortran]) 4 hours 

ELECTIVES (Computer Science — Upper Division) 8 hours 

Required COGNATE: 

BA 121 (Principles of Accounting) 4 hours 

55 hours 
MINOR (Field to be chosen) 28-32 hours 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 

This program qualifies a person to teach secondary school mathemat- 
ics. A secondary education minor is included to provide a balance between 
professional education and subject area concentration. 

Program Advisor: John A. Blake, Ed.D. 

Important: Consult the Program Advisor or the Education Office for a 
4- year checksheet listing the specific courses required within each of the 
areas summarized below: 

Humanities 20 hours 

Social Sciences 20 hours 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 20 hours 

Religion 18-20 hours 

Health & P.E 4 hours 

Humanistic & Behavioral Studies 20 hours 

Teaching Areas: Mathematics, and a second approved area 80-89 hours 

Other Requirements in Professional Studies 36-39 hours 

Other Requirements in General Studies 10-12 hours 

TOTAL 201-216 hours 

This curriculum will allow students, upon graduation, to apply for 
certification in the following areas: 

Alabama Class B Secondary: Mathematics and Second Area, grades 

7-12. 
SDA Basic Certificate: Mathematics and Second Area, grades 7-12 

Students desiring a career in secondary education should consult the 
Program Advisor and the Teacher Education Office no later than the first 
quarter of the sophomore year in order to plan an appropriate course-of- 
study. 



162 Oakwood College 

The exact course requirements may differ from student to student 
depending on the precise time student enrolls in teacher education. This 
curriculum is based on denominational, state, and institutional policies and 
is thereby subject to change. When student applies and is accepted to teacher 
education (after the sophomore year), a permanent checksheet is issued 
which should not change so long as student is continuously enrolled at 
Oakwood College. 

* Some courses may be counted twice in total hours. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

MA 100. BASIC MATHEMATICS 2 

A course designed for students whose mathematics scores on the ACT exam 
indicate definite weakness in arithmetical skills. Topics included are arithmetical 
operations, the decimal system and its uses in calculation, definition and elemen- 
tary properties of rational numbers, exponents, first degree equations, etc. 

MA 101. FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS 4 

Topics include number systems and their bases, sets, relations and their proper- 
ties, further extensions of the number systems, polynomials, relations, func- 
tions, and their graphs, ratio, proportions, and variation. Other topics include 
basic trigonometry, logarithms, and some topics in statistics. Does not apply on 
major or minor. 

MA 111-112, 113. PRECALCULUS Ml, III 4-4,4 

College Algebra and Trigonometry including such topics as rational expressions, 
rational exponents, equations and inequalities, relations and functions, exponen- 
tial and logarithmic functions, circular functions and trigonometric functions. 
Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra. NOTE: (This course replaces MA 
111-112, College Algebra and Trigonometry.) 

MA 201-202-203-204. ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND 

CALCULUS MMII-IV 4-4-4-4 

Limits, continuity, differentiation of algebraic functions, definite and indefinite 
integrals, partial and double integration, multiple integration, infinite series and 
vectors. Prerequisites: MA 111-112, 113 or equavalent. 

MA 21 1 . SURVEY OF CALCULUS 4 

An introductory study of differential and integral calculus, the theory of vector 
spaces, and linear algebras as applied to chemistry. Does not apply on a major or 
minor. Prerequisites: MA 111-112 or equivalent. 

MA 251. GEOMETRY 4 

An informal summary of elementary Euclidean geometry, a formal modern de- 
velopment of the basic concepts of elementary geometry, non-Euclidean 
geometry, and a selection of topics in advanced Euclidean geometry. 

MA 301. LINEAR ALGEBRA 4 

Algebra and geometry of vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices, 
linear equations, quadratic forms, and symmetric matrices. Prerequisite: MA 203. 

MA 305-306. APPLIED MATHEMATICS (Alternate years) 4-4 

This course is designed to expose the mathematics major to the type of things a 
mathematician employed in industry does , and to give him an opportunity to apply 
his knowledge of mathematics to solve problems in the Physical, Biological and 
Social Sciences. Prerequisites: One year of Calculus. 



Mathematics and Physics 163 

MA 307. STATISTICAL METHODS I 4 

An introductory study of statistical procedures. Topics include classification of 
data, measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion, frequency distribu- 
tions, elementary probability, simple regression and correlation, design and 
analysis of experiment. 

MA 308. STATISTICAL METHODS II 4 

A continuation of MA 307 with special attention given to the use of probability 
statistics and other nonparametric statistical tests. Prerequisite: MA 307. 

MA 31 1 . DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 4 

Differential equations with applications. Prerequisite: MA 204. 

MA 312. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS 4 

Numerical methods as they apply to computers. Topics include, roots of equa- 
tions, linear and nonlinear simultaneous equations, polynomials, numerical inte- 
gration, ordinary differential equations, interpolation and curve-fitting Prereaui- 
site: MA 203. * 

MA 321. PROBABILITY & STATISTICS 4 

Descriptive statistics; elementary probability; sampling distributions; inference, 
testing hypotheses, estimation; regression and correlation; application Prerequi- 
site: MA 203. 

MA 401-402. ADVANCED CALCULUS 4.4 

Limits, continuity, differentiation and integration of functions of several vari- 
ables. Convergence and uniform convergence of infinite series and imoroper 
integrals. Differentials and Jacobians, transformations, line and surface integrals 
vector analysis. Prerequisite: MA 311. 

MA 411-412. INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ALGEBRA 4-4 

Algebra of sets, equivalence relations, mappings, order relations; discussion of 
natural, rational, real, and complex number systems; study of the abstract sys- 
tems: groups, fields, rings, integral domain. 

MA 419. INTRODUCTION TO REAL ANALYSIS 4 

Elementary set theory, the real number system, sequences, limits of functions, 
continuity, differentiation, the Riemann-Stieltjes integral, infinite series. Pre- 
requisite: MA 203. 

MA 421 . NUMBER THEORY (Alternate years) 4 

A study of the properties of numbers; divisibility; Congruences and residue 
classes; quadratic reciprocity; diophantine equations; algebraic numbers. Pre- 
requisite: MA 411-412 or equivalent. 

MA 422. INTRODUCTION TO COMPLEX ANALYSIS 4 

Functions of a complex variable: integration; sequences and series, the calculus of 
residues and conformal mapping. Prerequisite: MA 204. 

MA 490. RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 

An independent study by the student under the guidance of the staff of such topics 
as Green's Theorem, Laplace Transorm, Bessel Functions, etc. 

MINOR IN PHYSICS 

PHYSICS MINOR 

PH 111-112-113 (General Physics) 4.4.4 hours 

PH 301 (Theoretical Mechanics) 4 hours 



164 



Oakwood College 



PH 305, 306 (Applied Mathematics) 
PH 311 (Electricity and Magnetism) 



4,4 hours 
4 hours 

28 hours 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

PH 101, 102. THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES 4,4 

A survey of astronomy, meteorology, geology, chemistry, and physics for the 
general student. Prerequisite: MA 101. 

PH 111-112-113. GENERAL PHYSICS 4-4-4 

A survey of the field of physics with numerous problems. Prerequisites: MA 
111-112. 

PH 301 . THEORETICAL MECHANICS 4 

An intermediate course covering the basic principles of vector mechanics and the 
statics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Offered when required. Pre- 
requisites: One year of college physics and one year of calculus. 

PH 305, 306. APPLIED MATHEMATICS 4,4 

This course is designed to expose the mathematics major to the type of things a 
mathematician employed in industry does, and to give him an opportunity to apply 
his knowledge of mathematics to solve problems in the Physical, Biological and 
Social Sciences. Prerequisite: One year of calculus. 

PH 31 1 . ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 4 

In this course the theory of electric and magnetic phenomena is studied. The 
following are some of the topics that will be included. Electrostatic and magnetic 
fields, introduction and use of vector analysis, circuit elements, electromagnetic 
effects of currents, radiation and Maxwell's equation. Offered when required. 
Prerequisites: One year of college physics and one year of calculus. 






L_ 



Music 



165 




Department of Associate Professor: Booth (Head) 

MUSIC Assistant Professors: Blackmon, Dennison, 

Lacy, Osterman, Ware 
MUSIC (MO) 

an inSEST "a ** de ^ aeM of music *» ^signed not only to develop 
an intelligent and appreciative attitude toward music but also to guide 

as a major or minor. For students who do not meet the geSSSKSS 

sfn?ertvTour; n ^e there I iS -r*^™^ P e ™d °f oJ fyear to aem™te 
sincerity of purpose, application and attitude. After this period, if the student 
passes a special examination, he will be given full status as a music makT 

Al music majors and minors will appear before the music faculty at the 
conclusion of each quarter for a jury examination. * * 

Participation in a musical organization is required for music maiors and 
minors^ Voice majors must be in the college choir or AeSs Thev ^e 

Smitfon 3 " 6 Pian ° UnleSS ** " aWe t0 P aSS * i»5?«wSS 

-d-ia^SSli * maJWS »> min ° rS at f J-- - -or 
™.Ki A " T S ' C maj0rs and minors ^ squired to participate in a number of 
ana ensembles will be determined by the music faculty and the student. 



166 



Oakwood College 



All majors must present a half-hour recital in their junior year and an 
hour recital during their senior year. All minors must present a half-hour 
recital. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR 

MU 161-162-163 (Applied Music — Piano) 3 hours 

OR 

MU 171-172-173 (Applied Music — Voice) 3 hours 

OR 

MU 181-182-183 (Applied Music — Organ) 3 hours 

MU 211-212-213 (Theory I and Literature) 9 hours 

MU 261-262-263 (Applied Music — Piano) 3 hours 

OR 

MU 271-272-273 (Applied Music — Voice) 3 hours 

OR 

MU 281-282-283 (Applied Music — Organ) 3 hours 

MU 31 1-312-313 (Theory II and Literature 9 hours 

MU 315 (Form and Analysis) 3 hours 

MU 321-322 (Music History) 8 hours 

MU 344 (Choral/Instrumental Conducting) 3 hours 

MU 351-352-353 (Sight Singing and Ear Training) 3 hours 

MU 361-362-363 (Applied Music — Piano) 3 hours 

OR 

MU 371-372-373 (Applied Music — Voice) 3 hours 

OR 

MU 381-382-383 (Applied Music — Organ) 3 hours 

MU 45 1 (Composition) 4 hours 

MU 461-462-463 (Applied Music — Piano) 3 hours 

OR 

MU 471-472-473 (Applied Music — Voice) 3 hours 

OR 

MU 481-482-483 (Applied Music — Organ) . . 3 hours 

51 hours 

MINOR IN MUSIC 

MINOR (Music) 

Immediate performance proficiency is required of all music minors. 
These requirements may be met by examination or nine quarter hours of 
applied music. Other course requirements include: 

MU 2 11-2 12-2 13 (Theory I and Literature) 9 hours 

MU 351-352-353 (Sight Singing and Ear Training) 3 hours 

MU 321-322 (Music History) 8 hours 

MU 344 (Choral/Instrumental Conducting) 3 hours 

Elective (Applied Music) 6 hours 

29 hours 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 
Concentration — Vocal/Choral 

This program qualifies a student to teach music at early childhood, 
elementary, and secondary levels. 



Music 167 

Program Advisors: Inez Booth, M.A.; Lucile Lacy, M.M.Ed. 

Important: Consult Program Advisor or the Education Office for a 
4-year checksheet listing the specific courses required within each of the 
areas summarized below: 

Humanities ~ A . 

Social Sciences 5° £ ours 

Son 8 ' 16 " 068 "^ Mathematics " •' : •' •* •* •' •' ■' ' ■" •' ' •' •' ' • •' •' ■ •' .' ■' •* i ■' •' 20 hZs 

Health & P.E.' ". ]'. \\\\\\\ \\\ ' • 18_2 ° !j ours 

Humanistic & Behavioral Studies '.'.'.' I '.'.'" 20 hnull 

Requirements of teaching area: Vocal/Choral Music ' .'.'.'." .' 60 hour. 

O her Requirements in Professional Studies " * ' 39.4V honr! 

Other Requirements in General Studies '.'.]'.'.'.[ 10 houJs 

* T0TAL '.'.'.'. 192-199 hours 

This curriculum will allow students, upon graduation, to apply for 
certification m the following areas: 

Alabama Class B Certificate: Vocal/choral music, N-12 
SDA Basic Teaching Certificate: Secondary grades, 7-12 
Alabama Class B Certificate: Instrumental, 10-12 

Students desiring a career in music education should consult the Pro- 
gram Advisor and the Teacher Education Office no later than the first quarter 
01 the sophomore year in order to plan an appropriate course-of-study 

I he exact course requirements may differ from student to student 
depending on the precise time student enrolls in teacher education This 
curriculum is based on denominational, state, and institutional policies and 
is thereby subject to change. When student applies and is accepted to teacher 
JZl T ( M tCr the u s °P homore y^), a permanent checksheet is issued 
S^ < ^. Chai * C S ° ^ " StUdCnt " conti ~ly rolled at 
* Some courses may be counted twice in total hours. 



MU 144 
MU211 
MU311- 
MU 



MU315 

MU321 

MU344 

MU 351 

MU451 

MU234 

MU231 

MU232 

MU233 

MU204, 

MU201, 



VOCAUCHORAL N-12 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

(Vocal Diction) . 

-212-213 (Theory I and Literature) 9 

-312-313 (Theory II and Literature) . . o 

(Applied Music) " yy 

(Form and Analysis) \ 

•322 (Music History) \ o 

(Choral/Instrumental Conducting) \ 

■352-353 (Sight Singing & Ear Training)' '.'. 1 

(Composition) ^ 

(Class Instruction in Strings) f 

(Class Instruction in Woodwinds) } 

(Class Instruction in Brass) 

(Class Instruction in Percussion) J 

205, 206 (Band Ensemble) . \ 

202, 203 (Choir) or MU 221-223 (Aeolians)' ".'.'.'.'.'.'. [ [ [ \ 



hour 

hours 

hours 

hours 

hours 

hours 

hours 

hours 

hours 

hour 

hour 

hour 

hour 

hours 

hour 



168 



Oakwood College 



Choose at least two (2) hours from the following: 

Jffi 3 a£ (Contemporary Music) 2 hours 

MU 457 (Pedagogy) 2 hours 

MU 490 (Research and Independent Study) 1.4 hours 

(Ensemble Credit [Band or Choir]) [ \ f \ hours 

60 hours 



INSTRUMENTAL 10-12 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
Vocal Choral 

MU 144 (Vocal Diction) 

Applied Music as approved by music faculty 

MU 201-203 or MU 221-223 (Ensemble) 

MU 322 (Music History) 

MU 323 (Contemporary Music) 

MU 211-213 (Music Theory and Literature) 

MU 391 (Recital) 

MU 451 (Composition) 

MU 491 (Recital) ..'."; 

Five hours of (MU) Electives in Music to be 

approved by program Advisor 

MU 353 (Sight Singing and Ear Training) 



1 hour 


6 hours 


6 hours 


4 hours 


2 hours 


9 hours 


1 hour 


4 hours 


1 hour 


5 hours 


1 hour 


40 hours 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
Instrumental 

MU 144 (Vocal Diction) 1 hour 

MU 211-213 (Music Theory and Literature) 9 hours 

MU 231, 232 (Class Strings, Woodwinds) 1,1 hours 

MU 233, 234 (Class Brass, Percussion) 1,1 hours 

MU 322 (Music History) 4 hours 

MU 323 (Contemporary Music) 2 hours 

MU 344 (Choral and Instrumental Conducting) 3 hours 

MU 351 , 352 (Sight Singing and Ear Training) 2 hours 

Applied Music as approved by music faculty 

(Required MU 391, MU 491) 5 hours 

Four (4) hours of (MU) Music Electives 4 hours 

MU 317, 318 (Form and Harmonic Analysis) 6 hours 

40 hours 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



MUSIC APPRECIATION 

MU 200. MUSIC APPRECIATION 4 

Fundamentals of music expression, such as melody, harmony, rhythm, form and 
meter are included in this course. The student is introduced to musical works 
which portray essential factors basic to musical understanding. Representative 
music literature is presented from several periods and composers. Classroom 
activities are coordinated with out-of-class assignments, such ajs television pro- 
grams, lyceum attractions and community concerts. 



L 



1 



3 

1 



1 

1 
1 
1 



Music 169 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

MU 124-125-126. ITALIAN, GERMAN, FRENCH DICTION 

AND REPERTOIRE 4-4-4 

The study of correct pronunciation of Italian, German and French, enabling 
singers to perform the extensive literature available in these languages. The 
introduction to song literature with intensive study of Italian, German and French 
languages. (1983-1984 school year). 

MU 144. VOCAL DICTION 1 

A special course designed for the Bachelor of Science Degree music education 
students employing group and individual singing techniques. (1982-1983 school 
year). 

MU 231. CLASS INSTRUCTION IN WOODWIND 1 

Class instruction in woodwind techniques with emphasis on the teaching strategies 
of master performers and teachers of the woodwind family of instruments. Open to 
non-music majors and minors who perform with the wind ensemble. (1982-1983 
school year). 

MU 232. CLASS INSTRUCTION IN BRASS 1 

Class instruction in brass techniques with emphasis on the teaching strategies of 
master performers and teachers of the brass family of instruments. Open to 
non- majors and minors who perform with the wind ensemble. (1982-1983 school 
year). 

MU 233. CLASS INSTRUCTION IN PERCUSSION 1 

Class instruction in percussion techniques with emphasis on the teaching 
strategies of master performers and teachers of the percussion family of instru- 
ments. Open to non- music majors and minors who perform with the wind ensem- 
ble. (1982-1983 school year). 

MU 234. CLASS INSTRUCTION IN STRINGS 1 

Class instruction in string techniques with emphasis on the teaching strategies of 
master performers and teachers of the string family of instruments. Open to 
non-music majors and minors who perform with the band. (1982-1983 school year). 

MU 343. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING MUSIC 

IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 4 

The organization and presentation of the following phases of music will be studied: 
rote singing, note singing, part singing, song repertoire, child voice, rhythm band, 
notation, music history and appreciation and proficiency on fretted instruments. 
(1983-1984 school year). 

MU 360. PASTORAL MUSICIANSHIP 4 

A survey of general musicianship and the study of problems related to the organi- 
zation and cooperative implementation of musical activities in the church. Open to 
prospective pastors and other interested students. Not credited toward a music 
major or minor. 

MU 443. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING MUSIC 

IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 4 

The place of music as a legitimate subject in junior and senior high schools is given 
careful attention in this course. Stress is placed on the structure and operation of 
good general music classes of various cultural background, the organization, and 
functioning of choral and instrumental groups, and the conducting of special 
interest classes at the senior high level. (1983-1984 school year). 



170 Oakwood College 

MUSIC HISTORY 

MU 310. THE HISTORY OF AFRO-AMERICAN MUSIC AND ART 4 

A study of the historical and stylistic development of black music from ancient 
Africa to the present. An assessment of black musicians who have shaped the 
musical climate of America. Also to study the art of black people in the Americas 
as well as in Africa. This course will serve as a medium towards the comprehen- 
sion of the mixture of the African and American elements and a better understand- 
ing of the role of black people in world cultural development. Emphasis will be 
placed on the impact of Afro-American art and architecture in the Western 
Hemisphere. Prerequisite: MU 200. 

MU 321-322. MUSIC HISTORY 4-4 

A study of music literature from antiquity to the present, cultural background — 
development of musical forms and styles and analysis of representative master- 
works from each major period of music history. Listening periods are required in 
addition to the class period. (1983-1984 school year). 

MU 323. CONTEMPORARY MUSIC 2 

A study of representative schools and composers of contemporary music, and 
application through original compositions, of their techniques. (1983-1984 school 
year). 



MUSICAL STRUCTURE AND ORGANIZATION 

MU 1 1 1 . FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC 4 

A basic course intended to lay a foundation in the following: notation, rhythm, 
scales, key signatures, chords, terms and form. Sight singing of basic diatonic 
music, non-modulating, programmed instruction in rhythmic, intervallis, melodic 
and harmonic dictation. This course is designed to strengthen the weakness of 
prospective music majors or minors who have had limited musical experience 
other than their performance medium. Designed to provide intensive training in 
the fundamental skills of musicianship at the keyboard with emphasis on the 
rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic concepts. No credit toward a music major or 
minor. Prerequisite: Recommendation by music department faculty. 

MU 211-212-213. THEORY I AND LITERATURE 3-3-3 

The measurements and organization of intervals, chords, scales, modes and 
modulation and their application in the structure of outstanding music literature. 
Keyboard harmony and creative writing are correlated activities. Prerequisite: MU 
111. 

MU 311-312-313. THEORY II 3-3-3 

A continuation of MU 211-212-213 with emphasis on the measurements and the 
organization of chromatic chords and their application in the structure of outstand- 
ing music literature. Keyboard and creative writing are correlated activities. 
Prerequisite: 211-212-213 or equivalent. 

MU 315. FORM AND ANALYSIS 3 

A study of structure of music from the small forms to the larger song forms , rondo 
forms, and sonata-allegro forms. Prerequisite: MU 311-312-313. (1982-1983). 

MU 317, 318. FORM AND HARMONIC ANALYSIS 6 

A continuation of MU 211-212-213 with greater emphasis upon chromatic har- 
mony and, also, a more intensive study of the structures of outstanding music 
literature from the small homophonic forms to the larger polyphonic structures. 



Music 171 

Keyboard harmony, improvisation, transposition, and creative writing are corre- 
lated activities. Prerequisite: MU 211-212-213. 

MU 351-352-353. SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING 1-1-1 

Sight singing in diatonic and chromatic music including modulation, further prac- 
tice in rhythmic intervallic, melodic and harmonic dictation. Prerequisite: MU 111. 

MU 344. CHORAL/INSTRUMENTAL CONDUCTING 3 

A study of the basic conducting patterns, expressive and interpretative vocabu- 
lary, duple, triple and irregular beat patterns expressive terminology, score read- 
ing, rehearsal techniques and general problems related to instrumental and choral 
directing. Prerequisite: MU 211-212-213. (1982-1983). 

MU 451. COMPOSITION 2-4 

Two- and three-part writing in 19th and 20th century contrapuntal style. Prerequi- 
site: MU 315 or Mu 317, 318. (1982-1983). 

MU 490. RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 

Individual research under the guidance of an instructor. Limited to junior and 
senior majors and minors. Prior approval of the Chairman of the Department. 

APPLIED MUSIC 

MU 101-102-103. BEGINNING CLASS INSTRUCTION IN PIANO 1-1-1 

A course in piano playing for the beginning student using group (small groups 
from two to five) and individual techniques. Credit does not apply on music major 
or minor. J 

MU 121-122-123. BEGINNING CLASS INSTRUCTION IN VOICE 1-1-1 

An elementary course in singing employing group and individual techniques 
Credit does not apply on music major or minor. 

MU 131-132-133. INTERMEDIATE CLASS INSTRUCTION IN PIANO 1-1-1 

Credit does not apply on music major or minor. 

MU 391. JUNIOR RECITAL 1 

An acceptable preparation and performance of a half-hour recital program, during 
the junior year, before members of the faculty. The recital may be opened to the 
public. 

MU 491. SENIOR RECITAL 1 

An acceptable preparation and performance of an hour complete recital program 
during the senior year, before members of the faculty. The recital may be opened 
to the public. v 

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION 

All juniors and seniors will be required to do a certain number of hours 
accompanying for the various ensembles. A grade for this work will be 
averaged with work done in private study. 

MU 161-162-163. PIANO 1 . 1 . 1 

MU 164-165-166. WOODWINDS 1 . 1 . 1 

MU 171-172-173, VOICE 1 . 1 . 1 



172 



Oakwood College 



MU 174-175-176, BRASS 
MU 181-182-183. ORGAN 
MU 184-185-186. PERCUSSION 

MU 261-262-263. PIANO 

Prerequisite: MU 161-162-163. 

MU 264-265-266. WOODWIND 

Prerequisite: MU 164-165-166. 

MU 271-272-273. VOICE 

Prerequisite: MU 171-172-173. 

MU 274-275-276. BRASS 

Prerequisite: MU 174-175-176. 

MU 281-282-283. ORGAN 

Prerequisite: MU 181-182-183. 

MU 284-285-286. PERCUSSION 

Prerequisite: MU 184-185-186. 

MU 361-362-363. PIANO 

Prerequisite: MU 261-262-263. 

MU 364-365-366. WOODWIND 

Prerequisite: MU 264-265-266. 

MU 371-372-373. VOICE 

Prerequisite: MU 271-272-273. 

MU 374-375-376. BRASS 

Prerequisite: MU 274-275-276. 

MU 381-382-383. ORGAN 

Prerequisite: MU 281-282-283. 

MU 384-385-386. PERCUSSION 

Prerequisite: MU 284-285-286. 

MU 461-462-463. PIANO 

Prerequisite: MU 361-362-363. 

MU 464-465-466. WOODWIND 

Prerequisite: MU 364-365-366. 

MU 471-472-473. VOICE 

Prerequisite: MU 371-372-373. 

MU 474-475-476. BRASS 

Prerequisite: MU 374-375-376. 

MU 481-482-483. ORGAN 

Prerequisite: MU 381-382-383. 

MU 484-485-486. PERCUSSION 

Prerequisite: MU 384-385-386. 



1-1-1 
1-1-1 
1-1-1 
1-1-1 

1-1-1 

1-1-1 

1-1-1 

1-1-1 

1-1-1 

1-1-1 

1-1-1 

1-1-1 

1-1-1 

1-1-1 

1-1-1 

1-1-1 

1-1-1 
1-1-1 
1-1-1 
1-1-1 
1-1-1 



Music 



173 



VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLES 



Although there is no charge for participation in music organizations 
(Other than tuition when taken for credit) , students must register for entrance 
into the organization. All students pursuing a music major must participate 
in a music organization each year of residence. 

Admission to any musical organization is by audition. Regular atten- 
dance is required at all rehearsals even though the student may not be 
participating for credit. 

Departmental ensembles on campus are organized and sponsored bv 
members of the staff. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
MU 201-202-203. COLLEGE CHOIR 1 . 1 . 1 

Designed for those whose major interest is in voice, membership is by invitation 
only with selection based upon character, talent, and musicianship with prefer- 
ence shown those studying in the vocal department. Repertoire includes all types 
and periods of music both sacred and secular. Concert appearances church 
services appointments, and field tours are regularly scheduled. 

MU 221-222-223. AEOLIANS 1 . 1 . 1 

The Aeolians is a highly selective ensemble, balanced for four- and eight-part 
55S25- Re P res . en tf tlv « works of the great masters of choral composition aTe 
studied, memorized, and performed. In addition to public programs, the choir goes 

2iSi 8 T ng P J 0gramS inlarger Churches ^d schools. MembersWMn this 
ensemble depends upon strict compliance with the rules and standards of the 
organization . 

MU 204-205-206. BAND 1-<M 

The Oakwood College band is organized to provide continued growth in the 
!Ht U v™ X K Per !. eiK ?, of "J US1C ™ a J°™ and minors and the general college, commu- 
?SrfSf * and will perform for church services, assemblies, and other campus 

eacC^^ Jsic <**' — *- 



174 



Oakwood College 




Nursing 



175 



Department of 

NURSING 



meet 



Associate Professor: York (Head) 
Assistant Professors: A. Dormer, C. Dormer, Meyer 

Instructor: White 
NURSING (NU) 

An associate in science degree nursing curriculum is offered to selected 
men and women students. 

The curriculum, approved by the Alabama Board of Nursing is com- 
posed of general education courses and nursing courses. The program may 
be completed in seven quarters. Upon completion of the program the 
student will be awarded an Associate in Science degree and will be eligible to 
write the state board test pool examinations for licensure as a registered 
nurse^ Graduates will be prepared to serve in staff nurse positions and 
seTtm s CarC 1S C ° mm0n ' recurrin g and immediate in a variety of 

One class is admitted to the nursing program each year in the Fall 
quarter Students wishing to take part of their general education courses 
before taking their nursing courses may do so. The general education courses 
are the regularly constituted courses of the college, and are taken with other 
college students. Acceptance for admission into the College does not au- 
tomatically mean acceptance into the nursing program, per se. 

Below are listed the requirements the prospective nursing student must 

1. Admission to Oak wood College. 

2. A high school grade point average of 2.50 minimum on a 4 00 
scale. Students applying with G.E.D.'s will be evaluated on an 
individual basis. 

3 a\ tbr^ ° f " C " ° r better in high sch ° o1 or coIle S e chemistry and 

4. General Math may be substituted for algebra. 

5. Physics may be substituted for chemistry. 

6. A minimum ACT composite score of 12 is required and 15 is 
recommended. 

7. A passing score on the English Entrance examination administered 
by the College must be made. 

8. A student who does not meet the high school G.P.A. average or 
AC I requirements may remove these deficiencies by attending 
college for at least two (2) quarters, during which time he may take 
a minimum of 12 hours each quarter in required courses leading to 
nursing, achieving a current and cumulated average of 2 50 or 
baST' ThCSe StUdentS Wil1 then be consi dered on an individual 

9. No nursing course may be repeated more than one time A 
minimum grade of "C" is required in each nursing cognate 
course. A student may make a "C- " in a nursing course for one 



176 Oakwood College 

quarter, but is then placed on nursing probation and must make a 
minimum of "C" in the nursing course the next quarter. 

1 0. Students with previous college work must have a minimum current 
and cumulative grade point average of 2.50 on a 4.00 scale. 

11. Remedial work in English may be required for students whose 
native language is other than English, or who score low on the 
College English Entrance Examination. 

12. Students are required to demonstrate satisfactory performance on 
standardized tests. Low scores on these tests may prevent/delay 
promotion and/or graduation. 

13. A general nursing review will be required of each graduating 
student prior to graduation, unless the student is exempted by the 
faculty of the Department of Nursing. 

14. Transfer students from another major or another college will be 
evaluated on an individual basis. 

15. The applicant must show evidence of physical, mental and moral 
fitness. Further references or information may be required regard- 
ing character, attitude or coping ability in case of questions in these 
areas. 

16. Students must demonstrate safe clinical laboratory performance as 
defined by written criteria available in the Department of Nursing 
office. Failure in either the theory course or clinical laboratory 
course will require repetition of both courses. 

The Oakwood College Department of Nursing will individually con- 
sider Licensed Practical Nurses/Licensed Vocational Nurses who may wish 
to enter the nursing program by challenging basic nursing courses. 

Whenever a student does not maintain an overall GPA of 2.00 in the 
program, he will be dropped from the nursing courses until he has dem- 
onstrated the ability to maintain a 2.00 average in his general education 
courses. The nursing faculty may then approve re-entry into the program. 

Through a planned system of advisement, a program is planned to meet 
individual needs of students. Faculty advisors will counsel students on 
transferable credits and requirements for academic mobility. 

The student who plans to progress to a baccalaureate degree program in 
nursing should' consult the bulletin of the school of his choice. 

A year of college chemistry is usually required. (B.S. degree) 

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN NURSING 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

NU 101 (Nursing I) 2 hours 

NU 101 L (Nursing I Laboratory) 2 hours 

NU 102 (Nursing II) 5 hours 

NU 102 L (Nursing II Laboratory) 2 hours 

NU 103 (Nursing HI) 5 hours 

NU 103 L (Nursing III Laboratory) 2 hours 

NU 104 (Nursing IV) 4 hours 

NU 104 L (Nursing IV Laboratory) 4 hours 



Nursing 177 

NU 201 (Nursing V) 7 hours 

NU 201 L (Nursing V Laboratory) 3 hours 

NU 202 (Nursing VI) 6 hours 

NU 202 L (Nursing VI Laboratory) 4 hours 

NU 203 (Nursing VII) 5 hours 

NU 203 L (Nursing VII Laboratory) 5 hours 

NU 220 (Trends) 2 hours 

58 hours 
Required COGNATES: 

BI 111, 112, 113 (Anatomy & Physiology) 4,4,4 hours 

BI 221 (Microbiology) 5 hours 

ED 250 (Philosophy of Christian Education) ■ . . 2 hours 

ED 271 (Survey of Human Development) 4 hours 

EN 101N-102N (English Composition) 4-4 hours 

PY 101 (Principles of Psychology) 4 hours 

Religion Elective 4 hours 

Behavioral Science Elective 4 hours 

Physical Education 1 hour 

44 hours 
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

NU 101. NURSING I 2 

This is an introductory course that includes the meaning of health and contempo- 
rary health trends. Individual client development is viewed throughout the life 
cycle. The nurse in the helping role is explored throughout various life situations. 
Basic skills required for the prevention and cure of disease and rehabilitation of 
client are taught, utilizing both college and laboratory facilities. 

NU 101 L. Nursing I Lab 2 

Selected Laboratory experiences to complement Nursing I. 

NU 102. NURSING II 5 

The content of this course is designed to provide the student with knowledge 
related to: the care of the surgical client; fluid and electrolytes; nutrition and 
elimination of solid wastes. 

NU 102 L. Nursing II Lab 2 

Selected laboratory experiences to complement Nursing II. Corequisite: NU 102. 

NU 103. NURSING III 5 

The basic human need of sexual role satisfaction is explored throughout the life 
cycle. Family centered care of the mother throughout the childbearing cycle is 
emphasized. Normal growth and development patterns and deviation from normal 
are identified in the child from conception through infancy. The nursing process is 
utilized in giving care to clients in a variety of clinical settings. 

NU 103 L. Nursing III Lab 2 

Selected laboratory experiences to complement Nursing III. Corequisite: NU 103. 

NU 104. NURSING IV 4 

This course is an exploration of blocks to communication and maladaptive be- 
havior resulting from inability to cope throughout the life cycle. It is designed to 
assist the student in utilizing nursing concepts so that competent application of 
nursing knowledge is employed in the care of physically and mentally ill clients. 

NU 104. L. Nursing IV Lab 4 

Selected laboratory experiences to complement Nursing IV. Corequisite: NU 104. 



178 



Oakwood College 



NU 201. NURSING V 7 

The course is designed to assist the student in developing skill in utilizing the 
nursing process in caring for clients exhibiting disorders related to safety, security, 
activity and rest. 

NU 201 L. Nursing V Lab 3 

Selected laboratory experiences to complement Nursing V. Corequisite: NU 201. 

NU 202. NURSING VI 6 

This course is designed to identify the commonalties and differences of frequently 
occurring illness. The major focus is on nursing care of clients in all age groups 
with disorders related to oxygen disturbances, hematological disorders and inter- 
ferences in cardio-vascular function. 

NU 202 L. Nursing VI Lab 4 

Selected laboratory experiences to complement Nursing VI. Corequisite: NU 202. 

NU 203. NURSING VII 5 

This course is designed to enable students to synthesize nursing knowledge. 
Principles of team leadership, emergency and disaster nursing are included. 

NU 203 L. Nursing VII Lab 5 

Selected laboratory experiences to complement Nursing VII. Corequisite: NU 203. 

NU 220. TRENDS 2 

This course is designed to enable the second-year student in making the transition 
from student to graduate by exploring the historical foundation of nursing, the 
current social and professional issues and trends, and the responsibility of the 
registered nurse as an individual practitioner, as a member of the nursing profes- 
sion, and as a member of the community. 



NU 121. RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY 



1-4 



NU 290. RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 

This course is designed to provide opportunities for the student to gain indepth 
experiences and knowledge in the field of choice. 



Religion and Theology 



179 




Department of 

RELIGION 

AND THEOLOGY 



Professors: Reaves (Head), Warren 

Associate Professors: Melancon, Wright 

Assistant Professors: Pitt, Vanterpool 



RELIGION (RE) AND BIBLICAL LANGUAGES (BL) 

The sub-areas of this division are three, namely (1) RELIGION n\ 
THEOLOGY, and (3) BIBLICAL LANGUAGES. K * UCjlON > ( 2 > 

n-w ™ C ^ EL T IGI0N ma J° r Allows a tailored course of study to prepare for 
ftbleW^InstnicMp, Classroom Teaching (Elementary, Secondary, 
and Higher Education levels), Literature Ministry, Medical Ministry 
Foreign Missions, and Laymen Leadership. THEOLOGY is for the major 
who looks to the Pastoral Evangelist ministries (with further ministerial 
training at the SDA Theological Seminary of Andrews University), and to 
the Military Chaplaincy. BIBLICAL LANGUAGES as an area offers a 
minor which includes Greek and Hebrew. 

as folfow 1 ^ t0 the SpCCialty areaS ° f full " time teachers in the department is 

Melancon (New Testament Studies) 

Pitt (Systematic Theology) 

Reaves (Homiletics and Urban Ministry) 

Vanterpool (Old Testament and Religious Education) 

Wright (Pastoral Ministry) 
Because of the large number of persons preparing for the pastoraV 
evangelistic ministry and the variety of new areas within the church for 
religious services, IT IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED THAT EVERY 



180 Oakwood College 

STUDENT IN THEOLOGY HAVE ALSO A DOUBLE (or SECOND) 
MAJOR in which case no MINOR is required. Such a student also takes a 
shorter list of "COGNATE" classes. 

The Department recognizes the true concept of Ministry is not limited 
to pastoral or professional ministry but is broad enough to include service in 
a number of areas. Accordingly the Religion and Theology program is 
structured, to undergird a diversity of Career options, and to develop 
multi- skilled ministries. 

Departmental majors must follow one of several study programs pro- 
viding a double profile of competence in ministry and related study areas.* 
Programs are as follows: 

A. Ministry and Management 

B. Ministry and Human Services 

C. Ministry and Mass Communications 

D. Ministry and Religious Education 

E. Ministry and Health Science 

F. Ministry and Biblical Studies 

*3.0 GPA Requirement 

G. Ministry and Literature Evangelism 

H. Para-Professional Programs in Ministry 

Students must consult their Program Advisor or the Religion office for a 
4- year checksheet listing the specific courses required within each of the 
study programs. 

All freshman theology students and all transfer theology students are 
required to take RE 100 (Introduction to Ministry). 

By the junior year proficiency must be demonstrated in the following 
areas: 

WRITTEN ENGLISH 
SPOKEN ENGLISH 

Those failing to do so in Written English must take the course EN 250 
English fundamentals. Those failing to do so in Spoken English must take 
the course CO 320 Voice and Diction. 

A requirement for acceptance into the professional ministerial program 
is the taking of a battery of tests designed to help prospective majors to better 
understand themselves, their vocational interests, strengths and weaknesses 
in relation to the work of the ministry. 

A requirement for graduation with a Theology Major is satisfactory 
participation in the Externship Program. Participants must be Seniors and 
have taken or be enrolled in Homiletics. 

The entire mosaic of courses in this division is designed to develop 
within the student a deep appreciation for the importance of the Bible in 
determining the true philosophy of life, to encourage the application of the 
teachings of Jesus Christ to the problems of our day, and to provide training 
for students who desire to serve the church and humanity. 




Religion and Theology j 8 j 

A two-year BIBLE WORKER INSTRUCTOR course for which the 
s udent receives an Associate Degree Diploma is described in the present 

tjJfr ? ??,R age 17 ° under the head ing ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE IN 
BIBLE WORKER INSTRUCTORSHIP. Ktt 1IN 

The person who is studying for the four-year BACHELOR OF ARTS 
JXon St ^ CCrtain t0 fUlfl11 thG f0ll0win ^ CUITi culum requirements for 

1. Courses in the MAJOR and required COGNATES 

2 * TON 68 ^ thC BASIC REQUIREMENTS or GENERAL EDUCA- 

3. Courses in the MINOR. 

ll No S rades below "C" may apply toward the major or minor. 

* Exceptions allowed only after consultation with the Department. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RELIGION 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Religion) 

RE 1 1 1 (Life and Teachings of Jesus) . ,, u 

RE 301-302 (Old Testament Prophets) ,i £ 0urs 

RF VA r ( p r ° P J; e : k { nter Pretation- Daniel) ' i! '. ! ! ! ! i ! ! 1 1 1 [ | ' " " ^ turl 

RE 321 %2^£*»«««» ~ Revelati0 ") • 4 hSS 

RE 323 (The work of the Bible Instructor) ] !! OUrs 

RE 412 (Acts and Epistles) \ £ ours 

RE 425 (Christian literature salesmanship) \ ° urs 

RE 441 (Bible Manuscripts) . manSmp ' 2 hours 

RE 451 (Contemporary Theology) 2 £ ours 

Electives (any two of the three: RE 201*, RE 20^ RE 423 ' '. " '. '. '. '. J_hZ^ 

Required COGNATES: 45 hours 

CO 201 (Fundamentals of Speech) 
ED 331 (Methods in Teaching Bible inthe Secondary School')' ' ' * 

K^^ J^ours 

11-12 hours 

MINOR (Field to be chosen) . 

28 hours 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THEOLOGY 

M4IftDm , COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Theology) 

RE 100 (Introduction to Ministry) 

RE 111 (Life and Teachings of Jesus') \ £ ours 

RE 301-302 (Old Testament Prophets) A £ ours 

RE 3 1 1 (Prophetic Interpretation - Daniel) 3 ~] u° ms 

RE 321 W 1 ^ " ~ Revetation) !. ! " " | " ." " \ \Zl 

RE 321-322 (Homiletics and Preaching) ■, ? ? ours 

RE 412 (Acts & Epistles) 8 3 " 3 hours 

RE 423 (Pastoral Ministry) " 4 hours 

RE 424 (Public Evangelism) * ? ours 

2 hours 



182 



Oakwood College 



RE 426 (Pastoral Stewardship) 2 hours 

RE 441 (Bible Manuscripts) 2 hours 

RE 451 (Contemporary Theology) 4 hours 

Electives (Any one of the four: 

RE 201, RE 202, RE 211, RE 425) 4 hours 

48 hours 
Required COGNATES: 

(See General Education for Language Requirement) 

CO 201 (Fundamentals of Speech) 4 hours 

HI 301 (Ancient History) 4 hours 

HI 441 (History of the Christian Church) 4 hours 

REMAINING 8 HOURS OF COGNATES TO BE SELECTED 
FROM THE FOLLOWING: 

MU 364 (Pastoral Musicianship) 4 hours 

PY 422 (Introduction to Counseling) 4 hours 

BA 491 (Business Law) 4 hours 

HI 3 14 (Denominational [SDA] History) 4 hours 

20 hours 
MINOR (Field to be chosen) 

Required COGNATES: (Theology Majors with a second major) 

(See General Education for Language Requirement) 

HI 314 (Denominational [SDA] History) 4 hours 



MINOR IN BIBLICAL LANGUAGES 

GREEK AND HEBREW 

BL 201 thru 302 (Greek) 

BL 411, 412 (Hebrew) 



20 hours 
8 hours 

28 hours 



MINOR IN RELIGION 

RELIGION MINOR 

RE 1 1 1 (Life and Teachings of Jesus) 4 hours 

RE 211 (Black Liturgy — An Historical Analysis) 2 hours 

RE 311 or 312 (Prophetic Interpretation — Daniel or Revelation) 4 hours 

RE 323 (The Work of the Bible Instructor) 4 hours 

RE 425 (Christian Literature Salesmanship) 2 hours 

RE 45 1 (Contemporary Theology) 4 hours 

20 hours 

Electives (Religion courses not below 200 level) 6-8 hours 

26-28 hours 



MINOR IN THEOLOGY 

(Ministerial Emphasis) 

THEOLOGY MINOR 

RE 1 1 1 (Life and Teachings of Jesus) 4 hours 

RE 21 1 (Black Liturgy — An Historical Analysis) 2 hours 

RE 311 or 312 (Prophetic Interpretation — Daniel or Revelation) 4 hours 

RE 321 (Homiletics and Preaching) 3 hours 

RE 423 (Pastoral Ministry) 4 hours 

RE 424 (Public Evangelism) 2 hours 



Religion and Theology 183 



RE 426 (Pastoral Stewardship) 

RE 451 (Contemporary Theology) " .' .' .* .' \\\'.'.'.\\\'.'.\\\\ \ {j° urs 

25 hours 

Electives 

4 hours 

29 hours 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RELIGION 
Concentration: Religious Education 

w This P r °S ram 'qualifies a person to teach secondary school Bible and to 
begin graduate study m such areas as school administrate, religious eTuca 
tion, guidance and counseling, etc, minor in secondary education included 

Program Advisor: James Melancon, M.A. 

Important: Consult Program Advisor or the Education Office for a 

ie y r su c ss ss the spedfic m ^ withi - eS * - 

Humanities 

Social Sciences . 20 nours 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics ' .'.' ?J| Jj ours 

Religion 2" hours 

Health & P.E. 18 ~ 20 nour s 

Humanistic & Behavioral' Studies ™ ? ours 

Teaching Area: Religion . . _, ^ £ ours 

Other Requirements in Professional' Studies' ,5 ! ours 

Other Requirements in General Studies ' f Z J ours 

♦TOTAL 12 hours 

193-195 hours 

^Zo^&S^Z^' upon graduation > to ^y <- 

S.D.A. Basic Teaching Certificate in Bible, grades 7-12 

ProgS d rdvist S S h a ,T reer J n S ,igiOUS eduCation should co ^ult the 
Z!ftT T eaCher Education Office no later than the first 

quarter of the sophomore year ,n order to plan an appropriate course of- 

The exact course requirements may differ from student to student 
depending on the precise time student enrolls in SdwSLS- tS 

is7eS7subi b e a crt d ° h n den ~ tiona1 ' state > and SSL23K3 

education ?af e th, f ' ^ StUdem ap P Iies and is acce P^ to teacte 
which shouM JfLZ T yeaf) ' a pem,anem checksheet is issued 
Sood College. gC *° ^ " StUdem * conti «y enrolled a. 
* Some courses may be counted twice in total hours. 



184 



Oakwood College 



ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE IN 
BIBLE WORKER INSTRUCTORSHIP 

For the student who is not available for the ' 'Four- Year' ' Bible Instruc- 
tor course and who desires minimal preparation in Bible Instructorship, 

without attaining the B.A. degree in Religion and Theology, a two-year 
curriculum is available for introducing such a person to practical instruction 

in the fundamental beliefs of Seventh-day Adventists and in public and 
personal soul- winning endeavor. A certificate is granted only to high school 
graduates upon the completion of this two-year course. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

BE 111-112 (Elementary Typing) 4 hours 

RE 1 1 1 (Life and Teachings of Jesus) 4 hours 

SO 101 or PY 101 (Principles of Sociology or 

Principles of Psychology) 4 hours 

EN 101-102-103 (English Composition) 4-4-4 hours 

RE 201-202 (Fundamentals of Christian Faith) 4-4 hours 

HI 103-104 (World Civilization) 4-4 hours 

CO 201 (Fundamentals of Speech) 4 hours 

PE 21 1 (Health Principles) 2 hours 

RE 321 (Homiletics) 3 hours 

RE 412 (Acts and Epistles) 4 hours 

RE 451 (Contemporary Theology) 4 hours 

RE 323 (The Work of the Bible Instructor) 4 hours 

RE 311-312 (Daniel and Revelation) 4-4 hours 

RE 331 (Gift of Prophecy) 4 hours 

RE 423 (Pastoral Ministry) 4 hours 

RE 424 (Public Evangelism) 2 hours 

RE 426 (Pastoral Stewardship) 2 hours 

ED 250 (Philosophy of Christian Education) 2 hours 

Electives 12 hours 

Requirements may be satisfied by: 

BL 201-202-203 N.T. Greek (12 hrs.) 

OR 
BL 201-202 N.T. Greek (8 hours) and 4 hours from electives listed below 

OR 
BL 201 N.T. Greek (4 hours) and (8 hours) from electives listed below 

OR 
(12 hours) Selected from electives listed below 

SW 415 (Gerontology: Death and Dying) 4 hours 

SW 201 (Introduction to Social Welfare) 4 hours 

RE 301-302 (Old Testament Prophets) 3-3 hours 

SO 291 (Introduction to Urban Studies) 4 hours 

RE 441 (Bible Manuscripts) 2 hours 

SO 43 1 (Afro- American Culture of Life) 4 hours 

TOTAL 96 hours 

CERTIFICATE IN CHURCH LEADERSHIP 

1st QUARTER 

EN 101 (Freshman Composition) 4 hours 

RE 1 1 1 (Life and Teachings) 4 hours 

RE 201 (Fundamentals of Christian Beliefs) 4 hours 

CO 201 (Fundamentals of Speech) 4 hours 

16 hours 



Religion and Theology 



185 



2nd QUARTER 

d£ ??? (Fundamentals of Christian Beliefs) 

RE 321 (Homiletics) 

RE 424 (Public Evangelism) ".'. 

RE 311 (Daniel) ... 

RE 425 (Literature Salesmanship) . .' .' .' 



3rd QUARTER 

RE 426 (Pastoral Stewardship) 
RE 423 (Pastoral Ministry) 
RE 322 (Homiletics) . . 
RE 312 (Revelation) ... 
RE 3 1 1 (Gifts of Prophecy) 



hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 



— 9 



TOTAL 

Qr tt! - 



4fe\~lfA 



15 hours 

2 hours 
4 hours 

3 hours 

4 hours 
4 hours 

17 hours 

48 hours 



1 



ep^/ng'on foTnTal Tducitioh* fekfc^ and exposure/ course 
var.at.on ,„ the program is available in consultation wfthtedSSST 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
RE 100. INTRODUCTION TO MINISTRY 

& ^^X2^£*g£&£8£ majo ? wi,h ,he ca " and role ° f 

the use of practicing professionals ' «SSllTif CT ° P " 0n i ln ministrv - Throu 8" 
^^^^X^f^TZn^^t^l be k ex P° sed t" the many facets of 
signed to acqua St them 3 toe ES *£ ln . ab attery of diagnostic tests de- 

theology snlnts ^^S^SSS^SSS' ***** "' *" freShman 
RE 101. INTRODUCTION TO THE BIBLE 

BiEl ffi.f** *"* C ° ntm ° f Biblical Wri,in ^ with emphasis on selected 
RE 111. UFE AND TEACHINGS OF JESUS 

p^bofc £&£&?& CtoZtZ^YJFl S,udy ° f , the P ri "oiples and 
/>re«,. P Two Srf ffS^ R^ol™ 3 *' 1 h ,he Gos " els - 
RE 201. FUNDAMENTALS OF THE CHRISTIAN FAITH 

ggtt^nsnstfSRr »» ana 

RE 202. FUNDAMENTALS OF THE CHRISTIAN FAITH 

A continuation of RE 201 , which is a prerequisite for this course 
RE 21 1 . BLACK LITURGY - AN HISTORICAL ANALYSIS , 

^2Z^^«a^^|-^Se^^.v Ad venU..Ch« re hi 2 „ 
worship. cmauing a psychological analysis and description of black 

RE 301-302. OLD TESTAMENT PROPHETS 

to all nations through SffSwB^AtSSfi??* " *" P™™*™ of redemption 
books along with thVuterary^d $&4£7 ° *' ^^^ ° f these 



1 



186 Oak wood College 

RE 31 1 . (PROPHETIC INTERPRETATION) DANIEL 4 

A study of the book of Daniel in which historical background and its pertinence to 
the times are stressed. 

RE 312. (PROPHETIC INTERPRETATION) REVELATION 4 

A study of this book of prophecy with special attention given to the portrayal of the 
controversy between the true and the apostate church forces. 

RE 331 . THE GIFT OF PROPHECY 4 

A course of study tracing prophetic ministry from creation to the re-creation. 
Primary aims for this study are to establish in the student's mind the place and 
purpose of the gift in the remnant church, and to reveal its influence upon the work 
and progress of that church. 

RE 412. ACTS AND EPISTLES 4 

A historical and exegetical study and survey of the book of Acts and the Epistles of 
Paul, tracing the origin of the Christian church, the spread of the Gospel from 
Jerusalem to Rome, the historical setting and purpose for the Pauline letters, and 
their relationships to the doctrinal developments and usages in the Christian 
church. 

RE 441 . BIBLE MANUSCRIPTS 2 

A study of the history of the English Bible, the methods of its transmission to men 
and its preservation through the years, problems of translations, versions, manu- 
scripts, textural criticism, etc. 

RE 450. CHRISTIAN ETHICS 2 

A study of the Christian Principles applicable to moral and ethical problems. 
Possible response of the Christian to such contemporary issues as race, poverty, 
health care, etc. 

RE 451 . CONTEMPORARY THEOLOGY 4 

This course is introductory to the fields noted in its title and focuses both on the 
practical aspects of Christian faith, its ethical grounds and goals and also on such 
theological elements as Liberalism, Conservatism, Dialectical Theology, and 
Neo-Orthodoxy. 

RE 490. RESEARCH AND INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 

This course limited to upperclassmen, consists of a research project in an area of 
theological interest approved by the Chairman of the Department. 



APPLIED THEOLOGY 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

RE 321-322. HOMILETICS AND PREACHING 3-3 

A study of the preparation and delivery of sermons and gospel addresses. The 
course stresses the mechanics of sermon construction and analysis, and provides 
adequate exercises to ensure some proficiency in both the construction and 
delivery of gospel messages. Meets four (4) days weekly each quarter for three (3) 
hours credit. Prerequisite: RE 111, 201 or 202, 311 or 312. 

RE 323. THE WORK OF THE BIBLE INSTRUCTOR 4 

A course designed to explore the principles and techniques of Bible teaching and 
personal evangelism. 



L 



— ^ 



Religion and Theology 187 



RE 423. PASTORAL MINISTRY 4 

This course surveys the work of the pastor and his soul- winning activities, coun- 
preafhing services ' administrative responsibilities, community interests and 

RE 424. PUBLIC EVANGELISM 2 

A study of the duties of the evangelist and his associates in the conducting of 
evangelistic campaigns. (If the student makes proper arrangeme^nts in advance 
with the Chairman of the Religion and Theology Division^ Say ^^SlfiVrequire 
ments of this course through FIELD WORK) require 

RE 425. CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SALESMANSHIP 2 

An introduction to the theory and practice of literature ministry, its goals its 
processes, its missions, its rewards. Elective only. 

RE 426. PASTORAL STEWARDSHIP 2 

JnihvS^f l eSignec! t0 . s y rv ?y ** Principles of Christian stewardship and the 
application of these principles in church organization and administration. 

BIBLICAL LANGUAGES 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
BL 201-202-203. BEGINNING N.T. GREEK 4.4.4 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the fundamentals of Greek 
f a rvTn r and se , nt f nce , str .ucture as found in the Greek New Testament Vocabu 
lary drills, simple translation, and reading exercises are provided in each lesson 

BL 301-302. INTERMEDIATE N.T. GREEK 4.4 

s T etoX^^ ° f Greek g ramm *r, with translation of 

selected readings in the Greek New Testament. Prerequisite: BL 201-202. 

BL 411-412. BEGINNING CLASSICAL HEBREW 4.4 

A survey of the most prevalent language found in the Old Testament with emohasis 
on syntax, sentence structure, vocabulary, reading and translaTion The objective 
is not only to better equip the student for graduate lork in BiSstudy but also to 

B^BM^^S t0 °n t0Ward an aC Ti ate ^erpretation SSSSSJ 
ing ot the Bible during his college career and during his personal studv Because 



188 



Oakwood College 




> 

DC 
< 

cc 

CD 



CO 

111 
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ill 

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Financial Information 189 



'FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

'l&ill^^^Z^*^ for the ' 83 -' 84 sch ° o1 year - Write < he 

Oakwood College is incorporated under the laws of the state of 
Alabama as a nonprofit institution. 

The General Conference has provided substantial investment in build- 
ing, equipment, auxiliaries and operational appropriations to meet the needs 
of quality education. 

Therefore , the amount which the student pays for his basic educational 
expenses is modest when compared to that of other private liberal a^s 

Economic conditions may make it necessary for the College Board of 
Trustees, or duly authorized administrative officers, or Finance Committee 
to make changes in the published bulletin. 

Application Procedures: See Admissions section of the Bulletin. 

BOARD ACTIONS 

anv tfm C eTJ.°h d ** ** ?i' ege B ° ard ' FaCult y ' or Finance Committee at 
Sited in ha mis h Bu e L L q E ™. f0rCe "' * "^ ""*«* «*™» 

SCHEDULE OF CHARGES PER QUARTER Resident ReTden, ApZmen, 

Students Students Students 

Tutition Package, per quarter: $1,221 $1,221 $1221 

luition package applies to residence hall and 
non-residence hall students taking 13 to 16 
hours per quarter, and includes tuition ^ 
applied music majors and minors ^yceufm " 
series, and( Umitedhealth service? ^V~—- • ? 

Residence Hall Package, per quarter: NA $640 — __ 

Includes room, board, unfinished laundry 
and one (1) $15 store card. Freshmen in- 
volved in Orientation and students required 
to participate in commencement events will 
be the guests of the College. When three (3) 
students are assigned to the same room for the 
entire quarter, a $75 discount will be given on 
account at the end of the quarter. 

Students Living in Campus Apartments, 

per quarter: -V\|Z. $3n 

($360 - 2 Bedroom; $315-1 Bedroom) U $K 

General Fee (Student Associaf^ fee, ma- ijES^T 

triculation fee, MV Yearbook, Spreading tffiM*> 

Oak) per quarter:^ %™ $3Q 

Books and personal items are not included in 
the package plan. These items of ($50-$ 100) 
must be provided for in addition to the pack- 
age charge. y 

Total Charges Per Quarter $T^qT $1^57 $U66 



190 Oakwood College 



Residence Hall Holiday Rate — $5.00 per night 

TUITION RATES PER QUARTER 

13-16 hours $1,221 

9-12 hours 1,100 

1-8 hours 102 per hour 

For each hour above 16, add 75 per hour 

Late registration fee 25 

METHOD OF PAYMENT 

Plan I: 

Pay in full tuition, room, board, and general fee on day of registration. 
Residence Hall students taking 9 hours or less will be required to register 
under Plan I. 

Plan II: 

Two-Payment Plan — Residence Hall students pay deposit of $1,395 
for 10-16 hours and the College will send bill to the student and guardian for 
the balance due on or before final examination date for the quarter as listed in 
this bulletin. (See Examination Schedule for date of final exams.) 

Plan III: 

Monthly Payment Plan — Oakwood College works cooperatively with 
The Tuition Plan, Inc. for those who desire to establish a monthly payment 
plan. The student or parent(s) may enter into an agreement with Tuition 
Plan, Inc. to pay all expenses for matriculating students over any given 
academic period (including one or more years) . Those parents and students 
who prefer to pay their educational expenses in convenient monthly install- 
ments, at low interest rates, may write to: 

The Tuition Plan, Inc. 
Donavan Street Extension 
Concord, New Hampshire 03301 
Community students pay tuition and general fee on day of registration. 

Married students living in campus apartments pay tuition and general 
fee on day of registration. 

Students and guardians should arrange financing for the entire school 

year, from September through May, and fulfill the financial requirements on 
schedule as follows: 

Quarters Registration Dates 

Fall Quarter September 2, 3, 5, and 6, 1982 

Winter Quarter January 2-4, 1983 

Spring Quarter March 20-22, 1983 

Veterans - A program is available which allows the Veterans Adminis- 
tration to make advance payments of educational assistance for veterans and 
other eligible persons for the first month or part of the first month in which 
the person registers. 



Financial Information ,„. 



the in U " f der CUrrent Veterans benef " P ro g ra ms are made directly to 
the student herefore, veterans must follow the same procedures in meeting 
financial obligations as apply to other students g 

For application and further details contact the Advisor to Seniors and 
Veterans in the Admissions and Records Office 

Oak wood College is approved by the Veterans' Administration as an 
accredited training institution. Those who qualify for educat ona J benefit" 
should contact the nearest Veterans' Administration Office. A certificate of 
eligibility will be issued by the Veterans' Administration Veterans are 
required to maintain satisfactory progress as listed on page 48 

OVERSEAS STUDENTS 

Applicants from overseas are required to deposit one quarter's resi- 
dence fee plus tuition in U.S. funds with the college business office prior to 
^issuance of the 1-20 form (1-20 Form is used ^securing the US smdem 

Students on resident visas, student visas, or visitor visas will he 
required to present budget to verify financial support for payment oac 
count, before official acceptance is issued by the Admissions ^office Thk 
budget should show total cost of academic as well asTivTng exnenses and 
how these expenses will be paid. Also this statement shouWbe noZzed as 

S a b n oS rate statement by *" student and his sponsor - 5S Z 

Withdrawal: CREDIT REFUND P0L 'CY 

practi^ fotwed WithdraWS *"" * •" and '^ Scho °'. *~ 
1 . Date of Withdrawal. The official date of withdrawal and the effec- 

coLtfJ, the CalC f ti0 " ° f a reftmd is the date °° *hfte 
completed drop voucher is turned in to the Records Office 

during fi ' n t lm T Char f gC °l $50 is made if the stude « withdraws 
during the first 7 days after the published registration date. 

SSti StUdent WhhdraWS 8 " M ** aft « ^^* 

^S* WithdraWS 15 - 21 da ^*r M«- 

N ?«s?eiss draws more than 22 ^ S ** «* 

These charges apply to part-time as well as full-time students 
3. Room and Board. The $15.00 store card is non "funaaoL The 

4 ' stdem fZ C w Th£ StUdem mUSt return me ID «■"» to 'he 
Student Affairs Office to establish eligibility for refund 

Sfof Sed" ntf ° n ^ " e giV6n f ° r tU,ti0 " refu " ds in the 



192 Oakwood College 

6. Return Home. If the student does not have funds for return fare 
home, an emergency assistance may be granted, provided there is 
sufficient credit in the account. 

7. Room Deposit. Refund will be made when the residence hall dean 
returns the signed residence hall contract to the Accounting Office 
The College reserves the right to apply the deposit to any unpaid 
obligations. 

8. Refunds. Credit refunds will be made 30 days after the monthly 
statement is received for the last month the student was in school, in 
order to be certain that all charges have been processed. For exam- 
ple, if a student drops out of school in December, a credit refund 
would not be made until after the January statement is prepared 
during the first week of February. 

If the student has received financial aid during the current quarter, any 
credit balance over $100 will be credited to the aid fund, with priority given 
to loans. Amounts less than $100 will be refunded to the person responsible 
for the student's account. Cash refunds will not be made to the student 
without authorization from the parent or the financial sponsor. 
Change in Study Load: 

During the first week following registration, students may make neces- 
sary changes in their class programs without charge. A fee of $5 will be 
assessed for each change in the course program after the first week following 
registration. No reduction in tuition charges will be made for program 
changes made after three weeks following registration. 

STUDENT BANK 

The Business Office offers a deposit banking service for the conveni- 
ence of students. Financial sponsors should provide the students with a 
regular monthly allowance so that personal items may be purchased by the 
student. 

REMITTANCE 

PAYMENT OF REGISTRATION FEES SHOULD BE MADE IN 
THE FORM OF: BANK DRAFTS, MONEY ORDERS, CASHIER'S 
CHECKS, CERTIFIED PERSONAL CHECKS OR CASH. MAKE ALL 
CHECKS PAYABLE TO OAKWOOD COLLEGE. 

Send payments directly to the student finance office and indicate the 
name of student to receive credit. 

MARRIED STUDENTS HOUSING 

The College has a limited number of one- and two-bedroom apartments 
for married students. A stove and refrigerator are provided but the student is 
expected to provide his furnishings and pay the monthly utility bills. Married 
students residing in College apartment units are required to pay a deposit of 
$125.00. This advance payment is paid in two installments. A payment of 
$50 is due with the housing application. A payment of $75 is due at the time 



Financial Information 



J 



the apartment or trailer is rented. This $75 payment will be refunded if the 

?wo R e ^°° m ^ artment $105.00 per month 

Two-Bedroom Apartment $I2 o.OO per month 

Residence in apartment is contingent upon student being registered for 
not .ess than ten , ( 10) hours per quarter for three quarters o the schoo yea, 
Write the Business Manager for reservations on campus. 

RESIDENCE HALL DEPOSITS 

Before registration, all students living in the College residence halls are 
required to pay a housing deposit of $75 00 resia ence halls are 

to the If e!lfranc n e 0t fee id ™ri the > ? "{'T™™ • *« deposit will be added 
io me entrance tee. This deposit is he d n trust until (UDon rereinf nf „ 

satisfactory inspection report) the student vacates hi room or Smen. 
teaves „ ,„ good condition, pays off his account in full an Z inTeke ' 
Son? ZT S ° ff,Ce Wi " the " issue a check for *e deposh to the studen ' 
?oSd r °° m ° r apar ' ment bC ' eft UMid * 0r dama g ed *e deposit S be 
In addition, the housing deposit will be regarded as securitv -gain.f 
damage to institut.onal property throughout the course o ? me schooler 
The cost of any arrangements necessary to correct the misuse or abuse of 
Co lege property and equipment on the part of a student wl" be charged to 
that student and the amount will be deducted from the housfng d?oosh 
Excessive abuse, the correction of which requires the use of fh. » f 

may be asked to gwe up his quarters and withdraw f on the residence Ml 
Ttasof course will jeopardize the student's continued matricul.ion anhe 

MUSIC CHARGES 

i««-, StU . d , e ntS u h ° register for music lessons are expected to continue taking 
lessons throughout the quarter. No refund is made if lessons £e drooned 

oftV f hn SeCO ?r leSS T fanyqUarterforreason ^'herhanp^ 
Band fee per quarter — $10.00. 



194 Oakwood College 

INCIDENTAL FEES (NO REFUND) 

Application Fee (Send Money Order) $10.00 

Auto Registration (per quarter) 5.00 

Auto Parking Dorm Students (per quarter) 10.00 

Band 10.00 

Change of Program 5.00 

Diploma 10.00 

Entrance Exams 10.00 

Examination for Waiver 25.00 

Examination for Credit (per hour) 20.00 

Graduation Fee 35.00 

Graduation in Absentia 30.00 

Laboratory (Breakage, up to) 10.00 

Late Examination Fee 10.00 

Late Registration 25.00 

NLN Tests Actual Cost 

Nursing Laboratory (per quarter) 30.00 

Nursing Pin — School of Nursing Actual Cost 

Nursing Uniform (Men and Women) Actual Cost 

Nursing Transportation Actual Cost 

Traffic Violations (See Traffic Regulations) 

Removal of Incompletes (each) 2.00 

Room Deposits — Residence Halls 75.00 

Room Deposits — Apartments 105.00 or 125.00 

Health Service Transportation (per trip) 3.00 

Return Check Handling Fee (per check) 5.00, 

i^tudeiitJ^acrjejLTmnsportation .^^. 50. 

Transcript of Credits Tv"^ 

(Transcripts will not be issued for students whose accounts are not paid in 
full or who are delinquent in payment of school or National Direct Student 
Loans.) 

FAMILY DISCOUNTS 

When two students from the same immediate family are in attendance at 
Oakwood College each taking twelve quarter hours or more and having the 
same financial sponsor, a tuition rebate of 5% will be applied to each 
statement. A 10% rebate will be applied to each account when three or more 
students have the same financial sponsor and are taking twelve or more 
quarter hours each. 

TERMINAL LEAVE PROCEDURES 

A student terminating or suspended from Oakwood College during any 
given quarter is required to obtain a terminal leave form from the Student 
Affairs Office, and obtain appropriate signatures. 

Identification Cards — The student must return his/her ID Card and/or 
check-out voucher to the Student Affairs and Student Finance Offices to 
establish eligibility for refund. 



Financial Information 



STUDENT LABOR REGULATIONS 

Work opportunities for students are available in departments and indus- 
ries operated by the College and local private businesses. These employing 

SS CI ™ t serve , their CUSt0merS dai1 *' ne «ssitating a uniform work nf 
force. Student employees are responsible for meeting all work aonoint 
ments including during examination weeks, breaks b^ZK 
for satisfactory job performance. Work superintendents reserve the rightto 

tZlXZVV^ s ™ r nSatisfaCt0ry ' Sh0uld a ^ ^nd ft 
necessary to be absent from work, he must make arrangements with his work 

superintendent and Student Health Service if he is ill 

Sh.H.nf c df T ha " S ™" tS ■" given P refer ence in the assignment of work 
Student Employment Office personnel will assist students in finding jobs 

,*" a student acce P ts employment, he is expected to retain it for the 
entire school year except in cases where changes are recommended bv he 
school nurse or approved by the Student Labor Committee. ShouW a .student 
receive opportunities for more favorable employment during a schookerm 
the transfer must be made through the Student Employment Office whh 
proper notice of up to two (2) weeks given the employing department Tf a 
studen s financial plan requires him to work, he must fot drop his work 
Acetic It makin i Pr ° P T aira W« with the DireclZf Studen, 
SE£^225? '" SUSPenSi ° n fr0m ClaSS "«"-»« until 
'Hie student pay rate is not less than student rates set bv the eovernment 

training. To further encourage this, special rates are available for those 
students who can schedule four (4) hour blocks. As an indication of the 

^X2T! t0 itS StUdCm Iab ° r Pr ° gram ' ^e classes 1 
scneduled so that students may arrange their work into four (4) hour blocks . 



TITHE 



PERSONAL PROPERTY INSURANCE 

fw f^Z™ 1 C ° lleg T e is not res P° n sible for the loss of private oroDertv bv 

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS FOR FINANCIAL AID 

s ,.,H^f Ct iI°n u 32 ° f , the Educa 'ional Amendments of 1976 states that ■ 

onlv «>% it Tl lSd ,0 reCeiVe federal student as «^ance and benefits 
only ,f that student is maintaining satisfactory progress in the course of 
shidy he is pursuing, according to the standards an'd prices of the Stu 






196 Oakwood College 

To be eligible for maximum benefits under all Title 1 V (Federal Finan- 
cial Aid) Program, the student must register for no less than a full-time class 
load of twelve (12) hours each quarter and also meet the following require- 
ments (the student should be aware, however, that it takes an average of 16 
hours quarterly to graduate in four years): 

Quarter Hours Financial Aid 

Attempted Suspension Level 

0-36 1.25 

37-72 1.50 

73-108 • 1.75 

108 up 1.95 

1 . Entering FRESHMEN must register for a minimum of 12 hours and 
successfully complete at least 9 hours thefirst quarter, at least 12 the 
second quarter, and an accumulated total of at least 36 the third 
quarter with a grade point average of no less than 1 .25 (D) at the end 
of the third quarter. 

2. SECOND YEAR students (36 hours finished with minimum 1.25 
GPA) must register for a minimal 12 hours and successfully com- 
plete at least 9 hours* this fourth quarter, at least 12 hours the fifth 
quarter, and an accumulated total of at least 72 hours the sixth 
quarter with an overall grade point average of no less than 1.50 
(D+) at the end of the sixth quarter. 

3. THIRD YEAR students (72 hours finished with a minimum 1.50 
GPA) must register for a minimum of 12 hours and successfully 
complete at least 9 this seventh quarter, 12 the eighth quarter, and an 
accumulated total of at least 108 hours the ninth quarter with an 
overall grade point average of no less than 1.75 (C-). 

4. FOURTH YEAR students (108 hours finished with minimum 1.75 
GPA) must register for a minimum of 12 hours and successfully 
complete at least 9 quarter hours the tenth quarter, 12 hours the 
eleventh quarter, and an accumulated total of at least 144 hours the 
twelfth quarter with a cumulative grade point average of no less than 
1.95 (C-). 

5. Any student registering beyond the fourth year, must successfully 
complete twelve (12) quarter hours each quarter thereafter, and 
maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 (C). 

To receive less than maximum federal aid, a student must register for 
and complete a minimum of 6 hours. Such students are required to maintain a 
GPA of at least 1.50 (0-72 hours) and 1.75 (73-108 hours). 

Students failing to maintain the minimum standards of satisfactory 
progress as defined by Oakwood College will not be eligible to receive Title 
IV (Federal Financial Aid) Funds. Those students who are eligible to receive 
Title IV Funds but also maintain a GPA less than 2.0 must take part in 
Oakwood' s Spgcia l Remedial Instruction Program (SIP) conducted by the 
department called Inner College. 



L 



J 



Financial Information 197 



2. 
3. 



The student's financial aid may also be terminated if it becomes 
apparent, through ..regularity of class attendance, failure to prepare assign- 
ments, and/or to take examinations as required, etc 

If a student becomes ineligible to receive Title IV Funds, for failure to 

Zs n SS S ?ry progress ' he or she may be considered f0r restorin S for 

L Er C Colie 8 e in ^ Spe ° ial InStrUCtion Pr °g ram < SIp ) conducted by 
Establishing the minimum requirement of GPA- 
Making a written appeal to the Chairman of the Financial Aid 
Committee and/or the Director of Student Financial Aid. 

FEDERAL FUNDS OR SOURCES OF AID 

1. Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) 

l Pa , f £ P f l !° ati0n t0 „ thiS Pr ° gram is availabIe t0 each student accepted for at 
lea t half-time enrollment at a post-secondary institution, generating a gran 

mf 19 a r^ eX T d , 0ne " half i he C ° St ° f eduCati0n - The «™ grant fo 
™ I T h0 °' ye f ' S $I ' 6500 ° ( based on y°«r school's cost) 
The student must be a United States citizen or permanent resident and 

bTen extST 8 5T ^-"If SCh ° 01 ' The di « ibiIit " for Basic G am has 
been extended to the period required for completion of the first under 

graduate baccalaureate course of study. For further info^afion or applt-" 

Oakwood Coifed ^ """^ C ° UnSe, ° r « *" RnanCial ^ ° fS at 
The name has been changed to Pell Grants for the 1 982-83 school vear 
^graL 86 " 3 '" Clairb ° rne> Pe " (D - W) Wh0 is the original SS 

2. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants are available to a limited 

Z^jlZ [W^ 7^1? Wh ° Ca " demonstrate a Lancia ne d 
ine max mum SEOG award has been increased to $2,000 00 per academic 

year, which ,s proportionally reduced if a student is emoTled fofless S a 

fidl academic year The eligibility for SEOG has been extended to the Period 

Zv 1? °^ l T n ° Uhe firSt u " d ergraduate baccalaureate course of 
shidy . For further information , or application , contact your local high school 
counselor or the Financial Aid Office at Oakwood College 

3. Guaranteed State Loan (GSL) and Federally Insured Student Loans 

Under this program an undergraduate student may borrow (from hi* 



198 Oakwood College 



(amount borrowed) and interest (9% for new borrower) begins when the 
student has ceased to be at least a half-time student. For further information, 
contact your local bank or the Financial Aid Office at Oakwood College. 

4. College Work-Study Program (CWSP) 

Students who need a job to help pay for their post-secondary education 
may be eligible for employment by Oakwood College under Federally- 
supported Work-Study Programs. Students must demonstrate a financial 
need and be enrolled in an eligible post- secondary institution as at least a 
half-time student. In general, the salary you receive will be based on the 
current minimum wage, but it may also be related to the type of work you do 
and its difficulty. If you need further information or application forms, you 
may contact your high school counselor or the Financial Aid Office at 
Oakwood College. 

5. National Direct Student Loan (NDSL) 

Students who have been accepted for enrollment by an approved 
post- secondary institution and students enrolled for at least a half-time 
course of study are eligible to apply for a NDSL. Students must demonstrate 
a financial need. The NDSL bears interest at the rate of four (4%) percent per 
year. Repayment of principal and interest on this loan begins when the 
borrower ceases to be enrolled for at least half-time, or six months after 
he/she graduates, whichever comes first. 

An eligible student may borrow up to a total of $3,000.00 if he has not 
completed two (2) years of a program leading to a Bachelor's degree; 
$6,000.00 if he is an undergraduate student who has completed two (2) years 
of study toward a Bachelor's degree and has achieved third year status (this 
total includes any amount you borrowed under NDSL for your first two (2) 
years of study) . For further information or applications , contact your local 
high school counselor or the Financial Aid Office at Oakwood College. 



Aid Program 


Type 


When To Apply 


Amount 


Eligibility 


Contact Person 


Academic Scholarship 


Grant 


Upon Acceptance 


$400.00 


Minimum Grade Point of 
3.50, Not a Recipient of 
Valedictorian or Saluta- 
torian Scholarship 


Admissions Office 


Alumni Scholarship 


Grant 




$50 & Up 


Enrolled/ Accepted for 
Enrollment and Needy 


Local Alumni 
President 


Federal College Work 




Priority Deadline 




Must Demonstrate Finan- 


Financial Aid 


Study 




April 15 




cial Need, Enrolled at 


Office 










Least Half- Time, Making 
Satisfactory Academic 
Progress 


High School Counselor 


Guaranteed State Loan/ 


Loan 


Eight Weeks Prior 


Maximum 


Enrolled/Accepted for 


Local Bank 


Federally Insured Student 




to Intended 


$2500 De- 


Enrollment 


Financial Aid Office 



Loan (GSL/FISL) Enrollment pendent, 

$3000 In- 
dependent 



Financial Information 



Aid Program 



Literature Sales 
Scholarship 



C. E. Moseley 
Revolving Loan 

National Direct Student 
Loan 



Nursing Scholarship 
Nursing Student Loan 



Basic Educational 
Opportunity Grant 
(BEOG) 

Salutatorian Scholarship 



Supplemental Education 
Opportunity Grant 
(SEOG) 



Three- Way Matching 
Scholarship 

Valedictorian Scholarship 



Type When To Apply Amount Eligibility 



Loan When Needed $300.00 Senior Theology Student 

Loan Priority Deadline Minimum Accepted for Enrollment 
April 15 $50.00 Enrolled at Least Half- 

Time, Demonstrate Finan- 
cial Need 



Grant Priority Deadline 
April 15 

Loan Priority Deadline 
April 15 

Grant Six Weeks Prior to 
Intended Enroll- 
ment 



Be a Nursing Student 
with Exceptional Need 

In Nursing Program 
Show Financial Need 

U.S. Citizen/Permanent 
Resident Accepted for at 
Least Half-time 



199 



Contact Person 



Grant Upon Acceptance $450.00 A Letter From High School 

Principal Certifying the 
Appointment 

Grant Priority Deadline Minimum Demonstrate Financial 

April 15 $200.00 Need, Enrollment at Least 

Half-time, Making Satis- 
factory Progress 



Conference Publish- 
ing Department, 
Minister, Coordinator 
of Literature Industry 

Chairman of Religion 
Department 

Financial Aid Office 
High School Counselor 



Nursing Department 
Financial Aid Office 

Nursing Department 
Financial Aid Office 

High School Counselor 
Financial Aid Office 



Admissions Office 



Financial Aid Office 
High School Counselor 



Grant Prior to Winter 
Quarter 



$600.00 Enrolled Winter Quarter Your Local Church 



Grant Upon Acceptance $500.00 A Letter From High School 

Principal Certifying the 
Appointment 



Admissions Office 



200 



Oakwood College 



DEGREES CONFERRED 

June 7, 1981 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Accounting, Mathematics 
Christopher Bernard Howard 

Business Administration, 
Religion 

Franklin F. Bradshaw 

Business Administration, 

Theology 

Glenward Alexander Bryant 
Stephen Andrew Lincoln 

Richardson 
Lorenzo Benny Shepherd 
Alfred Llewelyn Williams 

Chemistry, Mathematics 
Nathaniel Edmund Williams 

History, Theology 
Robert Crawford 
Richard Anderson Holder 

Social Work, Theology 
Wellesley Johnson 
Michael Ross 

Biology 

Constance Marie Finley 
Dwayne Anthony Holland 
Mark LeNard Wade 
Sonia Monica Webster 

Chemistry 

David Allan Crump 
Vantalyn Joann Dickson 
Calvin Jerome Harris 
Candace Lynn Pullins 
Joyce Monica Rollox 
William E. Royster, Jr. 
Wayne Eric Thomas 

Elementary Education 

Carmela I. Daniel 
Juanita Rochelle Hoover 



English 

Robert Lafayette Douglas 
Lisa Jewell McCallaster 
Sharon Marie Rainford 

History 

Bernard Barnabas Beale 
Denise Carrie Cleveland 
Kenneth Ezra Hicks 
Jacob Justiss, HI 
Charles Sidney Lester 

Home Economics 

Sophia Ngalo Otutubuike 

Music 

Dale A. Penn 

Jacqueline Matthews Waldon 

Psychology 

Glenn Eugene Alves 

Kristen Emily Davis 

Rose Christobel Yvette Dooley 

Karen Jeanne Lightford 

Carolyn Maria Jennette Meadows 

Leamon Thomas Moore, Jr. 

Ann Sylvester 

Religion 

Eloise L. Adams 
Milton Allen Blackmon 
Gloria Jefferson 
Demetrious Van Jones 
Ossie Randle, Jr. 
Glenn Winston Suddler 
Samuel R. Thomas 
Brent Darrell Waldon 
Jesse Lionel Wilson, Jr. 

Social Work 
Vance C. Bartley 
Virdee Levorn Boone 
Sherrel Elizabeth Downes 



Degrees Conferred 



201 



Ada McNeil 
Lorin Althris Phillips 
David K. Steele 
Florence Ellen Thomas, II 
Rosemarie S. Wilson 
Dan Augustus Tyson, Jr. 

Sociology 

Raynold Kym de'Vesco 
Cartwright 

Theology 

John Ellison Anderson 
James Anthony Boger 
Ronald Gaylord Brown 
Willie Damper, Jr. 
Michael D. Fisher 



Byron Rene Francois 

Guy W. Hunter 

Sherwin S. Jack 

Cherrie Lynn Lytle 
Jonathan Edward McCottry 
Hubert Morel, Jr. 
Jerome Richard Pondexter 
Robert Lovette Pressley 
Richard Andrew Reaves 
Hyke F. Robinson 
Ivan Roy Rugless, Jr. 
Veronica Elizabeth Spigner 
Winston S. Stephenson 
Victor Waller 
Herman Harry White 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Accounting, Business 

Administration 
Willis Epps 

Trudy Weatherspoon Willis 
Kenneth Eugene Winkfield 
Pamela Patrice Wright 

Accounting 

Lafe H. Fowler, III 

Miller A. Jacob 

John R. Jordan 

Gail Jeannette Lewis 

Reita Fae Valentine 

Adell Loretta Williams 
Biology 

Brian Clyde Bedney 

Gerald David Renwick Bedney 

Ira Lee Harrell, HI 

Kettlie Joseph 

James Marc Melancon 

Melvin Leon Seard, II 

David Joshua Wooding 

Business Administration 
Theophilus Keld Billingy 
Debra Lynn Crawford 



Rayford B. Cummings 
Trevor R. O. Dandy 
Glen E. Evans 
Elvirita Renee Finley 
Shaun Lydell Kanion 
Valeria Faye Newton 
Naomi Janilee Penn 
Donald Edward Robinson 
Lawrence Saunders 
Noreen Emily Sealey 
Donna Lynette Smith 
Albert Sidney Trent 
Pauline Augusta Johnson Ward 
Keith R. Webster 

Business Education 
Isa A. Stenson 

Early Childhood Education 

Desmond Kirk Pierre-Louis 
Elementary Education 

Linda F. Atkins 

Juliet Ann Bernard- Bartley 

Andrea Lenette Bethel 

Karen Eileen Davis 

Pamela Shavers Dudley 



202 



Oakwood College 



Gloria Holmes 
Gerald Louis Kibble 
Lynne Marie Middleton 
Ruth Lorraine Phillips 
Marvin Duane Shelton 
Benita Joyce Usher 
Pansy Catherine Walker 

Home Economics 
Iris Patricia Frazier 
Joy Menella Goffe 



Donna Adrienne Green 
Pamela Williams 

Medical Technology 

Ava Margaretta Willis Rivers 

Natural Sciences 
Andrea Denise Avery 
Delbert Leonard Minisee 
Hezekiah Nathaniel Moore, Jr. 
Darla Nadine Van Putten 



BACHELOR OF GENERAL STUDIES 

Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry 
Reginald William Coopwood 

Home Economics, Psychology, Sociology 
Karen Nadine Kelly 

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS 

Bible Instructorship 
Anthony J. Lewis 



ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE 



Accounting 

Debra Ann Jesu Strayhorn 

Communications 

Denise Carrie Cleveland 

Rosalind Gayle Johnson 

Lisa Jewell McCalaster 

Dale A. Penn 

JoAnne Michelle Tiffany Powell 

Ronald Anthony Woodfork 

Nursing 

Vivian Marcella Berry 
Evelyn F. Damus 
Jennifer Laverne Gray 
David James Henrys 
Christine Hilt 
Gloria Christabell McLaren 



Elsie Nazaire 
Yvonne Anita Nurse 
Laverne Pope 
Sharon Angella Powell 
Doris Ann Pugh 
Salathiel Robinson 
Devora Renee Sampson 
Josett Veronica Samuels 
Vivian Ruth Stevenson 
Christine Y. Aaron Teague 

Office Administration 
Gloria Jean Stella Hudson 

Secretarial Science 
Vickie Lynn Gwin 
Cynthia Smith 



Geographical Distribution 



203 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION 

1981-82 
UNITED STATES 

A) J tate Male Female 

Alabama 124 106 

Arizona 2 

Arkansas 2 i 

California 40 ^a 

Colorado j o 

Connecticut g 23 

Delaware I q 

District of Columbia 3 6 

Florida 42 35 

Georgia 25 30 

Illinois 23 yi 

Indiana 3 , ft 

Kansas A 4 

Kentucky 3 ~ 

Louisiana c , ^ 

Maryland 21 i« 

Massachusetts 1 -> 

Michigan jg , , 

Minnesota 2 , 

Mississippi 25 11 

Missouri 23 *- 

Nebraska 3 -, 

New Jersey n ja 

New Mexico 2 n 

New York 74 91 

North Carolina 28 16 

° hio *....!.*!."."."."; 31 35 

Oklahoma 2 5 

Oregon .!..!"! 1 5 

Pennsylvania 26 31 

South Carolina 7 * ^ 

Tennessee n ,, 

Tex as 12 

Virginia 8 g 

Washington 2 ^ 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 2 < 

Total U. S. Enrollment 554 ~^f 




13 
8 
5 
15 
39 
14 
49 
2 
26 
26 
6 
31 
1 
165 
34 
66 
7 
6 
47 
22 
27 
21 
16 
4 
1 
8 



1,162 



204 



Oakwood College 



Country 
Antigua . . 
Anguilla . . 
Aruba .... 
Bahamas . 
Barbados . 

Bermuda . 

Botswana . 

British V.I. 

Canada . . . 

Dominica 

England . 

France . . 

Ghana . . . 

Grenada . 

Guyana . 

Haiti 

Honduras 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION 

1981-82 
FOREIGN COUNTRIES 

Country 



5 
1 
1 
24 
3 

23 
1 
1 

11 

1 

29 

1 

. 6 

. 4 

. 7 

. 5 

. 3 



35 
15 

2 
24 

1 

1 
11 

3 



Jamaica 

L#>eria 

Martinique 

Nigeria 

Panama 

Sierra Leone 

St. Croix 

St. Lucia 

St. Kitts 

St. Thomas 

Swaziland 

South Africa 

Trinidad 

Uganda 

West Africa 

Zambia 

Zimbabwe 



23 

2 

2 



TOTAL 269 



Enrollment Summary 

ENROLLMENT SUMMARY 1981-82 
FALL QUARTER 

Classification p 

Freshmen 

Sophomores 

Juniors pg 

Seniors 101 

Special -. 

Unclassified 7 

TOTAL 729 



205 



Jl-82 




lie Male 


Total 


\ 257 


561 


154 


339 


122 


251 


106 


207 


16 


19 


11 


18 



666 



1,395 



WINTER QUARTER 

Classification ^ , 

Female 

Freshmen 2»7 

Sophomores j 7 o 

Juniors - " 

Lib 

Seniors 100 

Special ~ s 

TOTAL 717 



Male 


Total 


236 


523 


155 


334 


126 


252 


99 


199 


16 


41 



632 



1,349 



SPRING QUARTER 

Classification r , 

Female 

Freshmen 276 

Sophomores 17 ^ 

Juniors --. 

Seniors 10 

Special 2 

TOTAL ~ 



Male 


Total 


248 


524 


150 


325 


118 


241 


107 


208 


11 


36 



634 



1,334 



206 



Oakwood College 



INDEX 



Absences 60, 61 

Academic Calendar 7-10 

Academic Policies 49-63 

Academic Probation 57, 58 

Academic Year 49 

Accounting 99, 100 

ACT Test 42, 45 

Activities, Social 37 

Adding/Dropping Classes 52 

Administration 15-17 

Administrative Committees 28 

Admissions 45-49 

Admission Standards 45-48 

Advance Deposit 45, 190, 191 

Advanced Placement for Freshmen 45 

Apartments 40, 189 

Application Fee : . 194 

Applied Music 166, 168, 171 

Applied Theology 186, 187 

Architecture 44 

Art 144, 145 

Art History, 

Criticism and Education 145 

Assembly Absences 61 

Associate Degrees 65, 68 69 

Attendance Regulations 60 

Auditing Courses 58, 59 

Automobiles 39, 40 

Auxiliary Enterprises, Managers 16 

B 

Baccalaureate Degrees, 

Requirements for 63-65 

Bachelor of Arts Degree 67 

Bachelor of Science Degree .... 67 
Bachelor of General Studies 

Degree 69 

Bank, Student 192 

Basic Educational Opportunity 

Grant (BEOG) 197 

Basic Requirements for 

Graduation 63 

Behavioral Sciences 83 

Bible Worker Instructor 

Curriculum 184 

Biblical Languages ... 173, 182, 187 

Biology ... 91-97 

Black Studies 151 

Board Actions 189 

Board of Trustees 13 



Buildings and Grounds 34, 35 

Bulletin Under Which 

One Should Graduate 64 

Business Education 104-110 

Business Administration .... 98-103 



Calendar for 1982-84 7-10 

Candidacy for Degree 66 

Certificate in 

Church Leadership 184, 185 

Citizenship, Student 39, 40 

Change of Program 52 

Charges per Quarter 189, 190 

Checkout Procedures 194 

Chemistry 111-114 

Child Development 156 

Class Absences 60, 61 

Classification of Students 51 

CLEP 53-55 

Clubs 38 

Commencement 66 

Commercial Art 141-145 

Committees of the Faculty 29 

Communications 135-139 

Computer Science 100, 161 

Cooperative Programs 43-45 

Convocations 37, 56 

Correctional Science 86 

Corrections 61 

Correspondence and 

Extension Work 59 

Correspondence Directory 4 

Counseling Center 40, 41 

Course Numbers and Symbols 49, 50 

Course Schedules 50 

Credit Hours 50 

Curricula, Pre-Professional 70 

D 

Dean's List 56 

Degrees and Diplomas 63-67 

Degrees, Candidacy for 66 

Degrees, Conferred 200-202 

Degrees, Requirements for 65 

Degrees, to Medical and 

Other Professional Students 69, 70 

Departments of Instruction 82 

Dietetics 155, 156 

Discount, Family 194 

Dismissal 39 



Index 



207 



Division Chairmen and 

Department Heads 18 

Dormitory Fee 189 

Dormitory Supervision 40 

Dropping/ Adding Classes 52 

Dual Degree Programs 70 



Freshman Studies Program ... 42, 43 
Funds, Loan 197-199 



Education, 

Early Childhood 115-127 

Education, 

Elementary 115-127 

Education, Master's Degree 

Program in U7 

Education, Music 166, 167 

Education, Science 96, 97, 112,' 113 
Education, Secondary ..... 1 16^ 122 

Education, Special 116,' 120 

Education, Vocational ' 130 

Engineering 70 71 

English and Literature 131-139 

English Education 132, 133 

English Proficiency Exams ' 61 

Enrollment Summary 205 

Errors and Corrections 61 

Exam for Credit 53 

Exam for Waiver 53 

Examinations 52 

Examinations , Graduate Record 61, 62 

Executive Committee 13 

Extension Work 59 

Extracurricular Activities 

Participation 37 



Faculty of the College 19-26 

Federal Aid Programs 197-199 

Fee, Application 194 

Fee, Incidental 197 

Fee, Music 193 

Fee, Registration 51 , 194 

Final Exams 52 

Financial Aid 197-199 

Financial Information 189 

Fine Art 141-145 

Food and Nutrition 154, 155 

Foreign Languages ' 131 

Foreign Student Training 48, 49 

French '139 

Freshmen and New Students . . 45-47 
Freshman Classification . . 45, 46, 51 
Freshman Standing, 

Preparation for 45 



General Clerical 107, 108 

General Information ' 32 

Geographical Distribution . . 203, 204 

Geography 150 

Gerontology 86 

Governing Standards 38, 39 

Grade-point Average (GPA) 56 

Grades and Reports 55 

Grading System 55 

Graduate Record Examination 61, 62 

Graduate Studies 44, 45, 117 

Graduation Diplomas 66 

Graduation in Absentia 67 

Graduation with Distinction .... 56 

Grants, Basic Opportunity 197 

Grievance on Academic Matters . 63 
Guidance (see Counseling) 41 

H 

Handbook, Student 38 

Health and 

Physical Education 128-130 

Health Record 47, 48 

Health Service '37 

Historical Highlights 11, 12 

Hist ory 146-151 

History of Oakwood College ... 32 

History Teaching 147 

Home Economics 152-159 

Honor Roll 56 

I 

Incidental Fees 194 

Incomplete Work 56, 57 

Inner College '58 

Instructional Staff 19-26 

Instrumental Ensembles 173 

Insurance 195 

International Student 

Admissions 48, 49 

Intramural Sports '37 



Journalism and Print Media 136, 137 
Junior Classification ' 51 



Late Registration 51, 194 

Leaves of Absence ' 39 



208 



Oakwood College 






Liberal Arts Curriculum 67, 68 

Library • • 35 

Literature and English 131-139 

Literature Evangelist 

Scholarships 199 

Loan Funds 197-199 

Loans, State and 

Government 197-199 

Location 31 

Lyceum 3 ' 

M 

Majors and Minors 65, 66 

Married Students' Housing . 192, 193 
Master's Degree Program 44, 45, 117 
Mathematics and 

Computer Science 100, 161 

Mathematics and Physics ... 160-164 

Medical Technology 10 \l\ 

Modern Languages ■ 131 

Music \q\ 

Music Charges 193 

Musical Structure and 

Organization 170, 171 

Music Appreciation 168 

Music Education 166-169 

Music History 170 

Music, Private Instruction 171 

N 

Nursing 174-178 

O 

Objectives 33 

Off-Campus Employment 44 

Office Administration 104-110 

Orientation 42 

Overseas Students 191 

P 

Part-Time Faculty 27 

Pass-or-Fail Courses 56 

Payment, Method of 190 

Physical Education & Health 128-130 

Physics I 63 ' I 64 

Political Science 145, 150 

Pre-Anesthesia 74 

Pre-Dental 73 

Pre-Dental Assisting 79 

Pre-Dental Hygiene 75 

Pre-Engineering 71,72 

Pre-Examination Week .... 7-10, 52 
Pre-Law 72 



Pre-Medical 73 

Pre- Medical Record 

Administration 76 

Pre-Occupational Therapy 75 

Pre-Optometry 76 ,77 

Pre-Pharmacy 77, 7» 

Pre-Physical Therapy 75 

Pre-Professional Curricula 70 

Pre-Public Health Science 78 

Pre-Respiratory Therapy 79, 80 

Presidents of Oakwood College . 1 1 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine 80 

Pre-X-Ray 79, 80 

Professors Emeriti 19 

Proficiency Examinations 61 

Property Insurance 195 

Psychology 83 "^ 

Public Relations I 37 

R 

Radio-TV-Film 137, 138 

Refunds 191 

Registration, Change in 52 

Registration Fees 51, 194 

Registration, Late 51, 52 

Registration, Procedure 51 

Religion and Theology 179, 187 

Religious Education 179, 187 

Religious Life 37 

Religious Services, 

Attendance at 39, 60 

Remedial Classes 58 

Remittances 185 

Repeated Courses 58 

Requirements for Degrees 63 

Requirements for Graduation, 

General 63-67 

Research and Independent Study 62 

Residence Halls 40 

Residence Hall Deposits 193 

Rules and Regulations 38-40 



Satisfactory Academic Progress for 
Financial Aid 195- 

Scholarships, Alumni Matching . 

Scholarship, Conference Matching 

Scholarship Improvement Program 

Scholarship, Valedictorian 

and Salutatorian 199 

Science Education . 96, 97, 112, 113 

Second Bachelor's Degree ... 66, 67 



197 
198 
199 

57 



Index 



209 



Secondary Teacher 

Education 1 15-127 

Seminar Courses 62 

Senior Checksheets 66 

Senior Classification . s i 

sip :::::::: 57 

Social Activities 37 

Social Science 147 ? 143 

Social Work as co 

Sociology 37 

Sophomore Classification 51 

Spanish 139 

Special Education 120, 121 

Special Programs ' 41 

Special Students 47 

Speech " 13 ' 8? 139 

Standards 3g 45 

Standards for Graduation '63 

Student Bank 192 

Student Citizenship 39 

Student Classification 51 

Student Financial Aid 197.199 

Student Handbook 38 

Student Labor . ' 195 

Student Life 37-40 

Student Missionary Program . 62, 63 

Student Personal Guidance '41 

Student Teaching Internship 1 26 , 1 27 

Study Load 50 51 

Summer School 8, 10,' 59 

Superintendents of Services .... ' 16 

T 

Table of Contents 5 

Teacher Education Program . 116-118 



Telephone Directory 4 

Terminal Leave Procedures 194 

Testing ' 42 

Theology and Religion 179-187 

Tithe 195 

Transcripts 60 

Transfer Credits . 46 

Transfer Students 46, 47 

Transient Admission 59,' 60 

Tuition Payment Plans 190 

Tuition Rates per Quarter 190 

Two- Year Curricula 

65, 70-80, 89, 106-108, 140-145, 
155, 156, 176, 177, 184, 185 

U 

United Student Movement ... 39, 40 

Upper Division Standing '50 

Urban Studies gg 

V 

Vehicles, Use of 39, 40 

Veterans, Information for ... 48, 190 
Veterinary, Two- Four 

Cooperative 44 

Visiting Student Program .... 43, 44 
Vocal and Instrumental 

Ensembles 173 

Vocational Education 130 

W 

Welcome to Oakwood 31 

Withdrawal 49 

Work Study ' ' " 193 



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OAKWOOD COLLEGE 

Huntsville, Alabama 35806 



Nonprofit Organization 
U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Permit No. 341 

Huntsville, AL 35807 



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